Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 73.90
Liaison Pegah Djamzad
Submission Date Oct. 5, 2018
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

Simon Fraser University
PA-3: Participatory Governance

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.25 / 3.00 Pegah Djamzad
Analyst
Sustainability Office
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Do the institution’s students have a representative body through which they can participate in governance (e.g. a student council)? :
Yes

Do the institution’s students have an elected representative on the institution’s highest governing body?:
Yes

A brief description of the bodies and mechanisms through which students are engaged in governance, including information to support each affirmative response above:

The Simon Fraser Student Society (SFSS) is a student-led organization that represents and advocates for the interests of the 25,000+ undergraduate students at SFU. The Graduate Student Society (GSS) is the student society and government for all graduate students at SFU.

All student enrolled at SFU have the opportunity to participate in the Board of Governors or the Senate through elected representatives.

The Board of Governors is the senior governing body at SFU constituted under the University Act. SFU Board members do not receive any remuneration for their services to the Board. The overall responsibility for the business of the University (property, revenue and policies) is vested in the Board. The Board has 15 members including 2 elected students, one graduate and one undergraduate student.

The Senate is responsible for the academic governance of the University and so it must be concerned with all important matters that bear on teaching and research in the University; this includes the development of new initiatives, the formation of priorities, and the consideration and approval of policies. The senate includes sixteen* students, elected by and from the student body, with at least one student elected from each faculty and at least three undergraduate and three graduate students.


Do the institution’s staff members have a representative body through which they can participate in governance (e.g. a staff council)?:
Yes

Do the institution’s non-supervisory staff members have an elected representative on the institution’s highest governing body?:
Yes

A brief description of the bodies and mechanisms through which staff are engaged in governance, including information to support each affirmative response above:

All SFU staff belong to one of the following employee groups: APSA, APSA Excluded, CUPE and Poly Party. Within each of these groups there are unique opportunities for staff to participate in governance. For example, staff belonging to the Administrative & Professional Staff Association (APSA) group can volunteer to be part of one of APSA's many committees to provide leadership, government and management of the associations interest. Example committee's include: advocacy committee, finance committee, salary & benefit committee, pension advisory committee.

Furthermore, all staff have an avenue to participate in the Board of Governors (BOG), Senate and Senate Committee through elected representatives. For example, the staff representative in the BOG is elected by and from the employees of the university who are not faculty members and holds the appointment for 3 years. To be nominated for the seat candidates must have nomination endorsed and signed by at least five members entitled to vote in the particular election. In the election of a non-faculty employee to the Board of Governors, the employee with the highest numbers of votes shall be elected.

The Board of Governors is the senior governing body at Simon Fraser University constituted under the University Act. SFU Board members do not receive any remuneration for their services to the Board. The overall responsibility for the business of the University (property, revenue and policies) is vested in the Board.

The Senate is responsible for the academic governance of the University and so it must be concerned with all important matters that bear on teaching and research in the University; this includes the development of new initiatives, the formation of priorities, and the consideration and approval of policies.


Do the institution’s teaching and research faculty have a representative body through which they can participate in governance (e.g. a faculty senate)?:
Yes

Do the institution’s teaching and research faculty have an elected representative on the institution’s highest governing body? :
Yes

A brief description of the bodies and mechanisms through which teaching and research faculty are engaged in governance, including information to support each affirmative response above:

All SFU Faculty members belong to one of the following employee groups: SFUFA and TSSU. Within each of these groups, there are unique opportunities for faculty members to participate in governance. For example, faculty belonging to the SFU Faculty Association can volunteer to provide direction and expertise on one of the many committees to represent member interest. Example committee's include: advisory committee, equity committee, renewal, tenure and promotion advisor.

Furthermore, all faculty have an avenue to participate in the Board of Governors (BOG), Senate and Senate Committees through elected representatives. For example, faculty members employed in a manner deemed to be of a continuing engagement nature are entitled to nominate, stand as candidates and to vote in the pertinent faculty member elections to the BOG. All nominations must be signed by no less than five members entitled to vote in the election. In the election of a faculty member to the Board of Governors, the faculty member with the highest numbers of votes shall be elected. The term of office for faculty members is three years.

The Board of Governors is the senior governing body at Simon Fraser University constituted under the University Act. SFU Board members do not receive any remuneration for their services to the Board. The overall responsibility for the business of the University (property, revenue and policies) is vested in the Board.

The Senate is responsible for the academic governance of the University and so it must be concerned with all important matters that bear on teaching and research in the University; this includes the development of new initiatives, the formation of priorities, and the consideration and approval of policies.


Does the institution have written policies and procedures to identify and engage external stakeholders (i.e. local residents) in land use planning, capital investment projects, and other institutional decisions that affect the community?:
Yes

A copy of the written policies and procedures:
The policies and procedures:

SFU's three campuses are in different municipalities and SFU follows regulatory frameworks for community consultation processes and reviews as required in each municipality (Burnaby, Vancouver and Surrey).

Burnaby:
Development at SFU Burnaby campus falls under the land use planning and governance agreed to under the framework provided by the Official Community Plan (OCP) process (see attached). The drafting and updating of the OCP follows the City of Burnaby's community consultation process with extensive and multiple points of input from the community. The OCP incorporates the University's institutional needs as well as non-University development, and has led to the creation of UniverCity, a model, sustainable residential community, located adjacent to Simon Fraser University's Burnaby campus. It also includes a detailed environmental policy framework as well as an environmental regulatory framework. Furthermore, within the guiding principles set out in the OCP, SFU created SFU's Form of Development guidelines (2010 Burnaby Mountain Development Plan). This planning document works in conjunction with the OCP to guide development on Burnaby campus. https://www.sfu.ca/fs/planning/campus-development-planning.html

Apart from this consultation with the wider region, major projects on Burnaby campus generally hold at least one project open house on campus to invite internal stakeholders (students, faculty, staff) as well as other Burnaby stakeholders (UniverCity business owners, residents and the elementary school), to gather their input to inform the proposed design. For example, the new Burnaby campus Biomass Central Heating plant included hearings to explain the technology and multiple presentations were made to Council and planning department. We also regularly go through the City building permit process for development.

Surrey:
New development such as the SE3P Building in Surrey goes through the City of Surrey's public hearing consultation process as outlined in the City's brochure and on their website https://www.surrey.ca/city-government/14886.aspx

The SE3P is considered a central building block for downtown Surrey and the development received strong endorsement by the City and business partners. The design and building permit review process follow traditional channels at city hall.

Vancouver:
In Vancouver, SFU development also follow the very extensive City's requirements for consultation processes. Design review is also provided by the Vancouver Urban design panel.


Does the institution have formal participatory or shared governance bodies through which community members representing the interests of the following stakeholder groups can regularly participate in institutional governance?:
Yes or No
Local government and/or educational organizations No
Private sector organizations No
Civil society (e.g. NGOs, NPOs) No

A brief description of the bodies and mechanisms through which external stakeholders are engaged in institutional governance (including information about each stakeholder group selected above):
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The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
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Additional documentation to support the submission:
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