Overall Rating Silver - expired
Overall Score 48.23
Liaison Nick Cookson
Submission Date Jan. 20, 2016
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

Sewanee - The University of the South
OP-25: Hazardous Waste Management

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 0.75 / 1.00 Amy Turner
Director of Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability
Office of Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have strategies in place to safely dispose of all hazardous, special (e.g. coal ash), universal, and non-regulated chemical waste and seek to minimize the presence of these materials on campus?:
Yes

A brief description of steps taken to reduce hazardous, special (e.g. coal ash), universal, and non-regulated chemical waste:

· Hazardous Waste: Generated in generally in the sciences, arts, grounds and PPS departments are disposed of annually through a bidding process. These chemicals are logged and stored in a secure location with limited access. The science departments have, over the years, reduced the amount of chemicals they purchase for use and also utilize micro scaling in some experiments which reduces chemical use and waste byproducts. Also the use of toxic pesticides and herbicides has been reduced over the past 5 years with the current supervisor.

· Universal Waste: This waste increases as we continue to delamp fixtures, change out ballasts, and dispose of radio and equipment batteries. Disposal for these products occurs approximately quarterly.

· Biohazard Waste is produced by the biology department and disposed of as needed by a licensed contractor. This amount varies per instructor and class.

· Non-Regulated Waste such as waste oil is purchased by a vendor and sold on the secondary market while latex paint is generally donated to non-profits.


A brief description of how the institution safely disposes of hazardous, universal, and non-regulated chemical waste:

· Hazardous Waste: Generated in generally in the sciences, arts, grounds and PPS departments are disposed of annually through a bidding process. These chemicals are logged and stored in a secure location with limited access. The science departments have, over the years, reduced the amount of chemicals they purchase for use and also utilize micro scaling in some experiments which reduces chemical use and waste byproducts. Also the use of toxic pesticides and herbicides has been reduced over the past 5 years with the current supervisor.

· Universal Waste: This waste increases as we continue to delamp fixtures, change out ballasts, and dispose of radio and equipment batteries. Disposal for these products occurs approximately quarterly.

· Biohazard Waste is produced by the biology department and disposed of as needed by a licensed contractor. This amount varies per instructor and class.

· Non-Regulated Waste such as waste oil is purchased by a vendor and sold on the secondary market while latex paint is generally donated to non-profits.


A brief description of any significant hazardous material release incidents during the previous three years, including volume, impact and response/remediation:

No such events have occurred in the past 3 years.


A brief description of any inventory system employed by the institution to facilitate the reuse or redistribution of laboratory chemicals:

No such program exists at this time.


Does the institution have or participate in a program to responsibly recycle, reuse, and/or refurbish all electronic waste generated by the institution?:
Yes

Does the institution have or participate in a program to responsibly recycle, reuse, and/or refurbish electronic waste generated by students?:
No

A brief description of the electronic waste recycling program(s):

All old computers, displays, kb/mice, etc are not thrown away. For many years now, we have donated to public schools, churches, and to employees items that would not normally be issued back out to an office, lab, or classroom area. So, this could be termed as recycling as the equipment isn't dumped and serves others who might not otherwise have computing equipment.


A brief description of steps taken to ensure that e-waste is recycled responsibly, workers’ basic safety is protected, and environmental standards are met:

Items that we no longer use are disposed of in a metal bin just behind the CompTel Center after we pirate them for pieces that we might use in other units. Those bin items are then removed by Marty Hawkins' PPS crew. I believe now he takes those items down to Winchester, but you would need to check with him on that. Used toner cartridges are boxed in original cartons and we use the HP recycling program for those.


The website URL where information about the institution’s hazardous and electronic-waste recycling programs is available:
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