Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 79.39
Liaison Yolanda Cieters
Submission Date March 5, 2021

STARS v2.2

Seattle University
AC-8: Campus as a Living Laboratory

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 4.00 / 4.00 Yolanda Cieters
Sustainability Manager
CEJS
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Campus Engagement?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Campus Engagement:

(1) MKTG-3510 “Buyer Behavior”, every year (Dr. April Atwood):
Routinely, in this class, students choose a project topic that relates to sustainability-related behaviors on campus, such as reuse and recycling; more sustainable food choices;…. The student teams are encouraged to talk to the relevant managers and coordinators on campus, so they can learn more about the current state and can coordinate their recommendations with university goals and initiatives underway. They sometimes present their recommendations (via a person-to-person presentation or a written report) to the managers/coordinators related to their work.

(2) MKTG-4960, Independent Study, Winter 2019 (Dr. April Atwood)
Two graduate students at the Albers School of Business and Economics developed develop a framework and design for a “Green Office Program” for SU employees. The students presented their research findings and recommendations to SU’s Sustainability Manager.

(3) In the Fall of 2019, an art exhibit titled “For the Record” showcased the work of senior art students in an interactive collection of art and stories raising awareness of climate change: https://seattlespectator.com/2019/10/18/the-stories-of-climate-change-at-the-vachon-gallery/

(4) EVST 3400 Research Design and Statistics class (offered twice yearly; Dr. Hayes): In every class a number of students (6-12) look at food consumption on campus; waste management and transportation choices.


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Public Engagement?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Public Engagement:

(1) 2018: An SU student in the Masters in Sport Administration and Leadership program developed the Sustainability Strategic Plan for the 2018 Special Olympics USA Games (hosted by Seattle and taking place on SU campus, among other institutions) with the ambitious goal of becoming the first carbon neutral Special Olympics USA Games in history: http://seattleuniversity.createsend1.com/t/ViewEmail/t/E22BE8EB1E63EEA9

(2) 2016-present: Graduate students in the Counseling program (College of Education; Dr. Kristi Lee) completed a multi-year research project in partnership with the City of Seattle to learn about the effects of hate crimes on members of target groups. They hope to submit their paper, entitled, “The Ripple Effect of Hate Crimes: Diffused Hate Crime Victimization and Trauma” for publication later this year.

(3) Summer 2019: Graduate students in Fine Arts Leadership (College of Arts and Sciences; Dr. Jasmine Mahmoud) researched and compiled a nonpartisan Seattle Arts Voter Guide to engage city council candidates and community members on critical issues in the arts in advance of the summer 2019 primary.

(4) 2019: Undergraduate students in Digital Design (College of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Naomi Kasumi and Lucas Boyle) created posters for the organization Real Change (a weekly street newspaper based in Seattle, written by professional staff and sold by self-employed vendors, many of whom are homeless) to help educate the public and city council about the need for public hygiene stations for people experiencing homelessness in Seattle.

(5) MBA 5205—Teams and Decisionmaking (Dr. Jeffery Smith): This course includes a service learning element where students exercise leadership skills to partner with organizations to serve the community. Recent examples (Fall 2020): student groups worked to clean up waste on the Duwamish River; students maintained Kruckeberg Botanical Gardens in Shoreline.

(6) Many classes at Seattle University encompass “service-learning” into them where students serve the community by working at locations such as local elementary and high schools, recovery homes, food banks, soup kitchens, and more. 44% of students partake in at least one service-learning class before they graduate:
https://www.seattleu.edu/cce/
https://www.seattleu.edu/cce/volunteer/service-learning/
EXAMPLES:
a. Spring 2019, MEGR 3240: Heat Transfer (Dr. Yen-Lin Han) – This is an undergraduate course that focused on student projects in collaboration with the SU center for community engagement. Students did an energy audit for the Hilltop house, a senior housing on First Hill. By applying their heat transfer knowledge, students performed an energy audit of the Hilltop House’s current energy use and proposed modifications to the building that could reduce their energy bills in the long term.
b. Over the past two years, ADVC 330: Social Impact Advocacy (Dr. Steven Bender) – This class allows the students to organize teams around a social problem of their choice and develop a legal and social-based response to that problem. In the past couple years, most every project has been steeped in racial equity goals, and at least one of the projects around environmental degradation of the Duwamish river.
c. Summer 2020, The Seattle University School of Law’s Summer Institute for Technology, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship (SITIE): (Dr. Steven Bender) This summer program has a course on innovating the built environment, and several student projects in that course over the last two years have addressed sustainability. Projects from 2020 include, environmental gentrification impacts, construction industry sustainability, zoning and affordable housing, and more.
d. Fall 2019, UCOR 1600: Nature and Culture (Dr. Tapoja Chaudhuri) – Students volunteer at Beacon Hill Food Forest during their Saturday Work Parties. Each class went once for about a minimum of 2 hours. Students got hands-on experience on the work that goes into creating/maintaining urban edible gardens, the principle of permaculture that this organization follows, the sense of community these activities foster. Students were also asked to write a short reflection paper based on their experience of working in the garden.

(7) The Institute of Public Service’s “Project on Family Homelessness” uses journalism, art and storytelling projects to help engage the community to make family homelessness rare, brief and one time only in Washington state. The oldest continuous homelessness advocacy project at Seattle University, the project was established in 2009 through a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. An eighth grant from the Gates Foundation enabled to continue the communications and advocacy work through mid-2020. See here for the Project on Family Homelessness portfolio: https://www.seattleu.edu/artsci/departments/ips/community-projects/project-on-family-homelessness/

(8) Summer 2019: Dr. Henry Louie (Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering) and his Kilowatts for Humanity team of students and professionals installed a solar-powered “energy kiosk” that powers three small businesses in Cheeba, Zambia: https://seattleuniversity.createsend1.com/t/ViewEmail/t/DD98C6EB3645F44D2540EF23F30FEDED
https://www.kilowattsforhumanity.org/

(9) Spring 2019: Students from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering worked to support a World Relief community garden in Kent, WA. World Relief Seattle provides a range of services to refugees from around the world who have relocated to the Puget Sound area: https://www.seattleu.edu/cejs/ejs-research-at-su/food-systems/world-relief-garden/
https://seattleuniversity.createsend1.com/t/ViewEmail/t/61266B6ADEE60F7A2540EF23F30FEDED

(10) Many SU students are involved with the Seattle University Youth Initiative, which strives to strengthen education and support systems for 1,000 neighborhood youth and their families while enhancing the University by providing service-learning and research experience for students, faculty, and staff: https://www.seattleu.edu/cce/suyi/?redirect=true

(11) As a home for pro bono, public interest, and social justice activities, the Access to Justice Institute (ATJI) prepares students for a lifetime in law in furtherance of social justice through opportunities to engage with underserved and marginalized communities: https://law.seattleu.edu/centers-and-institutes/access-to-justice-institute and https://www.facebook.com/AccesstoJusticeInstitute

(12) BIOL 4650: Conservation Biology (Dr. Mark Jordan); every year: Students help with a region wide wildlife survey project, collecting and processing data from camera traps for the Seattle Urban Carnivore Project, which is a collaboration between SU and the Woodland Park Zoo.

(13) AY18-19 and 20-21 Civil and environmental engineering Capstone projects sponsored by King County (Dr. Marsolek): Both projects focus on upgrading stormwater management facilities in King County. The goals are to provide flood control and improve water quality for downstream systems including salmon habitat.

(14) AY18-current: Dr. Marsolek and a student have been working on a project over the last few years to examine the feasibility of anaerobically digesting compostable plastic bags to be used in the Mt. Everest Biogas Project (MEBP).


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Air & Climate?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Air & Climate:

(1) Each academic year, two SU undergraduate student interns assist the sustainability manager with data collection, analysis and reporting for Seattle University’s GHG emissions inventory: https://www.seattleu.edu/media/cejs/files/what-you-can-do/CEJS-Internship-SQ-21-SPRING.pdf.

(2) In AY2018-2019, an environmental science student assisted the CEJS and the PCS (President’s Committee for Sustainability) with research for and writing of the “Climate Positive SU” proposal making the case for why and how SU could become the first climate positive university in the world. The proposal was presented to all shared governance bodies at SU (students, staff, faculty) and they all signed on in spring 2019. It was then shared with Cabinet members and SU President Sundborg in May 2019. See: https://www.seattleu.edu/media/cejs/files/campus-sustainability/Guide-to-Carbon-Offsets-FINAL_043019.pdf


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Buildings?:
No

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Buildings:
---

Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Energy?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Energy:

(1) CEEGR 3860, Sustainable Engineering, Winter 2021 (Dr. Phillip Thompson):
Students selected 10 buildings on campus that had adequate roof area for solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. Using the material they learned in class, students designed the PV systems and determined how much additional energy the campus could generate. Using Seattle University’s Kolvenbach houses (two, early 20th century houses that are used for student housing), students in the course size PV arrays, reimagined the building envelopes and sized rainwater collection systems for toilet flushing.

(2) In Winter 2020, a Public Affairs student worked with CEJS and SU Facilities to create a “Resource Conservation” display that would travel to the different residence halls each quarter to inform and educate student residents on the amount o energy and water used each year in each residence hall, why this is relevant and why we should care as a campus community and what we can do to save more. The display was planned to travel across campus in spring 2020; this has been postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Food & Dining?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Food & Dining:

(1) Every year, an SU student intern works with the Grounds department to coordinate the “Edible Campus Initiative” (ECI). This ongoing internship was established in 2015 to facilitate learning about urban agriculture and provide opportunities for students to engage in growing, planting, tending, harvesting produce on campus and in the university greenhouse. The interns maintain records of SU gardens and Seattle area gardens, and do advocacy for food waste reduction and food justice.
In 2019-2020, the ECI student intern created an Edible Campus marketing plan, collaborated with various university departments on edible campus procedures; and maintaining artwork and maps of the Edible Campus.

(2) Winter 2020: Two students worked with Redhawk Dining (Chartwells, SU’s food service provider) in its Food Recovery Network student team. Redhawk Dining donates surplus food to a local non-profit called Operation Sack Lunch who serves those in need located in the greater Seattle area. The students supported Redhawk Dining in helping recover the surplus food and coordinate the food recovery efforts.


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Grounds?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Grounds:

(1) The Seattle University grounds are designated a Wildlife Sanctuary by the Washington State Fish and Wildlife Department. There are several classes that utilize the campus as a laboratory to study and understand the wildlife on campus.
a. UCOR 1800: Sound Ecosystem (Dr. Beate Liepert)—This course uses the campus in a number of ways including: Identifying epiphytes and the environment they live in on campus; studying biodiversity on campus by using a quadrant of the lawn to identify species and abundance.

b. EVST 2100: Natural History—This class regularly uses the campus for investigations of flora, fauna, and their interactions. The class studies bird and animal uses of places around campus.

c. UCOR 1800 Inquiry Sem in Natural Science: “Taking Flight: Avian Biology”, Spring 2018 and 2019 (Dr. Rebecca Hartley)
Students went on bird walks around campus every other week to study bird identification, habitat, and behavior. They made an illustrated bird guide featuring 8-10 species. At the end of the quarter, they counted campus birds together and submitted the data to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's eBird database.

d. BIOL 3990 Research Development/Practice, Spring 2018-2020: (Dr. Rebecca Hartley)
7 students were involved with monitoring bushtit nests on campus for research credit. They studied the timeline of nesting, the locations of nests, and recorded bird behaviors. Students have presented research posters at on-campus, state, and regional science conferences. Through this study, students recognize the importance of insects as food to these birds raising their chicks, the many elements such as moss and lichen they use to build their nests, and the tall atlas cedars they choose to nest in -- all good things present on the SU campus.

e. BIOL-3850 Plant Physiology (2020)(Dr. Michael Zanis)
Students focused on biodiversity of mosses and liverworts on campus. Students collected moss and liver specimens and used DNA sequencing to examine their systematic/taxonomic relationships with respect to each other.

(2) MKTG-4520 “Marketing Management”, spring 2020 (Dr. April Atwood):
A student team worked with the Grounds department at SU to devise a marketing plan for them to use in planning and communicating their work on promoting sustainability involvement on campus. The student consulting team developed strategies and specific tactics that could be used to promote on-campus food cultivation, plant sales, community gardening, the installation of rain gardens, and other Grounds-related activities. They presented to members of the Grounds department at the end of their quarter of work.

(3) An Environmental Studies student is the Sustainable Landscape Management intern with the SU Grounds department, studying the SU campus green infrastructure, pollinators and pollinator gardens, and healthy environments. (AY2020-2021)

(4) In spring 2020, an Environmental Studies student served as the Vi Hilbert Ethno Botanical garden intern with SU’s Grounds department, highlighting indigenous plants and the Lushootseed language that was preserved by elder Vi Hilbert. The intern studied the garden and maintained the garden plant guide: https://www.seattleu.edu/grounds/campus-gardens/

(5) In winter 2020, a Communications/Journalism student was the Backyard Wildlife Sanctuary intern, studying the SU wildlife habitat, interviewing SU gardeners, developing the SU_Wild Instagram, maintaining the grounds backyard wildlife webpage, and completing signage: https://www.seattleu.edu/grounds/wildlife-sanctuary/

(6) In 2019, an environmental Studies student served as the Tree Campus USA intern with SU Grounds, studying the tree canopies and maintaining tree root flare project.
In 2018, the Tree Campus USA student intern created a biography for significant trees of Seattle University. The biography gives a background on the many historical trees on Seattle U's campus. It includes photographs and the biological and historical significance of each tree. See: https://www.seattleu.edu/media/cejs/files/trees-of-SU.PDF

(7) In 2018, a graphic design student created the “Seattle University Campus Tree Map,” a self-guided map identifying significant trees on the Seattle University campus: https://www.seattleu.edu/media/grounds-and-landscaping/campus-trees/trees-of-seattle-university-/SU-tree-map-brochure-combined.pdf


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Purchasing?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Purchasing:

(1) FALL2018-WINTER 2019: An SU student (Albers School of Business – Marketing) worked on a project for SU’s Procurement department, performing vendor data entry related to Supplier Diversity and Sustainability, to identify the various diversity and sustainability categories provided on the vendor records. This project was done to allow diversity and sustainability categories to be displayed on SU’s electronic procurement system (ProcureSU).

(2) MotMot, a direct trade coffee company, began in 2015 on SU campus when a group of business and engineering students received a global grant focused on economic development. Over the years, MotMot received the same global grant 4 years in a row and made progress in the coffee industry by partnering with coffee co-ops to foster ethically sourced product quality and community development. While advancing as a business, MotMot also built its team of executives while simultaneously integrating a student intern team. Starting as a small group of 5 people, MotMot now has a diverse team of over a dozen Seattle University students who come from different backgrounds and majors. Students on the MotMot team gain unparalleled business experience in international business and ethical company management. They develop skills through experiential learning and educates & encourages consumers on ethical coffee consumption. https://motmotcoffee.com/blogs/news/our-story-becoming-a-direct-trade-coffee-company.


IIs the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Transportation?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Transportation:

In Winter 2020, SU conducted a campus-wide Commuting Survey. The survey was an initiative by CEJS (Center for Environmental Justice and Sustainability) who engaged an environmental studies student in analyzing the results and writing the survey’s report. The student learned about commuting habits by SU's community and how to measure and analyze the carbon impact of commuting.


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Waste?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Waste:

(1) MKTG-3510 “Buyer Behavior”, spring 2019 (Dr. April Atwood):
A class project focused on 'recycling right' on campus. Students were tasked with developing approaches to encourage accurate recycling by SU students on campus. The students coordinated with the recycling manager on campus and collected data to support their work. The students presented their proposals to the recycling manager at the end of the quarter.

(2) MGMT 5340–Business Consulting, Fall 2019 (Dr. Robert Spencer):
A team of students from the Albers School of Business did a life cycle assessment of two food containers: the Green GrubBox Reusable Container versus the Single Use Compostable containers that are currently used in all SU food outlets. The team presented its findings and recommendations to CEJS, members of the PCS (President’s Committee for Sustainability) and the Chartwells team (SU’s food service provider). The study was done to help inform SU and Chartwells whether to continue using compostable, disposable containers or switch to a reusable plastic option.

(3) This AY20-21, a group of students is working on a year-long project as part of the “Project Center” with their SU campus sponsors CEJS and Facilities. https://www.seattleu.edu/scieng/project-center/
The students are tasked to create and launch an online platform at SU to post and request used items for free. Goal is to keep used items circulating withing the SU community to reduce future purchasing and move closer to SU’s goal of becoming zero waste by 2025.

(4) Seattle University has joined the Post-Action Landfill Network (PLAN), a nationwide organization dedicated to empowering student leaders to help their campuses achieve zero waste goals through step-by-step advising. In AY19-20, Students in the Environmental Studies program were the inaugural Zero Waste Student Coordinators supporting SU's transition to zero waste: https://seattleuniversity.createsend1.com/t/ViewEmail/t/DD98C6EB3645F44D2540EF23F30FEDED


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Water?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Water:

(1) In winter 2021, ESW students (Engineers for a Sustainable world) at SU are working with staff from Facilities to assess the performance of the McGoldrick Learning Commons rain garden. This includes installing sensors that they have built to monitor the infiltration rate of the rain garden.

(2) UCOR 1800 “Sound Ecosystem” (Dr. Beate Liepert)—This course uses the campus in a number of ways including studying SU’s rain gardens to learn about green infrastructure models.

(3) In Winter 2020, a Public Affairs student worked with CEJS and SU Facilities to create a “Resource Conservation” display that would travel to the different residence halls each quarter to inform and educate student residents on the amount o energy and water used each year in each residence hall, why this is relevant and why we should care as a campus community and what we can do to save more. The display was planned to travel across campus in spring 2020; this has been postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Coordination & Planning?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Coordination & Planning:

(1) Seattle University’s CEJS works every other year on the submission of the STARS report, engaging 2-3 student interns to collect and analyze data and assist in writing the report. The STARS report is a vital tool to guide our university’s sustainable development efforts and support the integration of sustainability into the institution’s planning.

(2) Each year, six students (4 undergraduate representatives; two graduate representatives) serve on the President’s Committee for Sustainability. The PCS (consisting of students, staff, and faculty) oversees the implementation of Seattle University’s Climate Action Plan and the integration of sustainability initiatives across the SU community. As members, the students are asked to support the PCS with research, outreach and participation in projects serving SU’s sustainability action planning and implementation. https://www.seattleu.edu/cejs/campus-sustainability/presidents-committee-for-sustainability/

(3) In AY2020-2021, two undergraduate students (environmental science and environmental studies) are conducting a comparative study of the organizational structure of sustainability committees, programming, and planning at exemplary peer higher education institutions. The study will inform the PCS (President’s Committee for Sustainability) on the existing organizational approaches to sustainability and help the Committee in evaluating SU’s sustainability structure.

(4) Winter-Spring 2019: An SU Sport Business Leadership student created a sustainability strategic plan for SU’s Athletics department, highlighting its sustainability efforts and providing recommendations for improvement.

(5) Winter 2018, Environmental Studies capstone project titled “Universities Climate Action Plan Evaluation and Best practices: The shift to culture of sustainability on campuses”: The project aimed at providing SU with best practices for climate action plans.


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Diversity & Affordability?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Diversity & Affordability:

(1) UCOR-1600 “Food & Culture”, Spring 2019 (Dr. Sinha Aakanksha):
This class consisted of undergraduate students. For their final projects, students were required to develop a prototype for a community action tool. Using a participatory method, all students decided to focus their projects on food insecurity within the SU college campus. Students were divided into 4 groups. Each group conducted 4 in-depth interviews each, as well as online surveys gathering data from over 200 students on campus. The interviews informed their final prototype ideas which included (i) food scholarship program for food insecure students, (ii) website for information and food awareness exchange, (iii) Instagram handle to build awareness about stigma related to food insecurity on campus, and (iv) on campus fruit and vegetable stand using SU produce.

(2) SOCW 4030—Social Work Capstone, Spring 2020 (Dr. Sinha Aakanksha):
This class consisted of 18 Bachelor’s in Social Work majors. All students were in their senior year and this project was their capstone. All students conducted a literature review on food insecurity on campuses, analyzed 24 in-depth interviews that were conducted with SU students, and provided recommendations to Office of Multicultural Affairs on improving nutritious, culturally relevant and college appropriate food to students. Their projects also highlighted the disproportionate impact of food insecurity on academic achievement and overall wellbeing of students on campus.

(3) SOCW 5420—Social Work Program Evaluation, Spring 2020 (Dr. Sinha Aakanksha):
This class consisted of 14 Masters in Social Work students. All students were in their generalist year of the social work program, and were conducting this project to learn research skills and its contribution to effective social work practice. For this project all students were divided into 6 groups. All groups analyzed interviews that were collected by undergraduate students in a previous UCOR class. The MSW students provided their analysis of the results, highlighted the gaps in steady access to food and its impact on the overall wellbeing of students. Lastly, they also highlighted the specific roles that social workers could play within the college setting, as well as at the policy level to reduce hunger on campus.

(4) NURS-5031 “Promoting Population Health”, Fall 2019 (Dr. Laura Houdek):
In this class, students explore the roles and competencies of public health nurses in identifying determinants of health promotion and disease prevention across the life span. In Fall 2019, two groups of students partnered with the Office of Multicultural Affairs.
The first group focused on developing Food Justice education materials for SU campus (support of Food Justice Week; creation of infographics for social media; creation of a document of facts about food security on college campuses including information for the SU community to understand what resources might be available and how to access them).
The second group focused on food security and promoting resources. They led a few workshops for the SU community during Food Justice Week to share resources in the community and promote the SU pantry, they promoted the SU pantry in the College of Nursing and other colleges on campus and created a plan to edit and streamline the food security website.

(5) Winter 2019, Environmental Studies capstone project titled “Inclusion and Sustainability in Higher Education”: The project examined diversity and inclusion indicators and specifically how they would apply at SU.


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Investment & Finance?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Investment & Finance:

(1) The Socially Responsible Investments Working Group consists of faculty, staff, and two students (an undergraduate and a graduate student representative). The SRI working group serves as the liaison between the campus community and Seattle University’s Investment Committee. It provides information and recommendations to the Committee on socially responsible investment issues that can be taken into account when making decisions on investments, policies and practices for Seattle University. SU members who join the Working Group get a chance to research socially responsible investment and support more sustainable investments by SU. Example: The working group adopted the final recommendations on Fossil Fuel Divestment on January 10, 2018, and they were presented to the Board of Trustees for further deliberation and consideration on February 22, 2018. The Board approved the recommendations on September 13, 2018. https://www.seattleu.edu/finance-and-business-affairs/treasury-and-risk-management/sri/divestment/

(2) The Business Plan Competition was started in 1998 by Dr. Harriet Stephenson. It is designed to help students and alumni in launching new business ventures, including for-profit businesses, not-for-profit businesses, corporate entrepreneurship, and social enterprise. Participants enhance their Seattle University learning experience, gain feedback on ideas, develop networks, and expose their ideas to potential investors.
In 2020, the grand prize winning team was "Nature's Label": the team by SU undergraduate student Arya Mathew, created an eco-friendly sticker that is biodegradable, replacing the plastic PLU produce variants, and reducing plastic and energy waste.
See: https://www.seattleu.edu/business/centers-and-programs/iec/business-plan-competition/past-winners/


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Wellbeing & Work?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Wellbeing & Work:

1. The Health and Wellness Crew (HAWC) with "SU's Wellness and Health Promotion" is made up of student volunteers who are trained as certified peer health educators. They offer support, provide resources and develop and implement programs and awareness campaigns across campus.
https://www.seattleu.edu/wellness/hawc/

2. University Recreation's (UREC) fitness program is engages student staff in experiential learning connected to health and wellness. Fitness instructors go through a GFIT class which teaches them the basics of anatomy and how to properly warm up and cool down the body (in addition to the specifics of the classes they are hoping to teach). After this training they then teach those classes to peer students, faculty and staff. Every day of their job they are leaning into creating wellness for our broader community.
https://www.seattleu.edu/recreation/


Website URL where information about the institution’s living laboratory program is available:
---

Additional documentation to support the submission:
---

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.