Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 75.64
Liaison Yolanda Cieters
Submission Date March 2, 2018
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

Seattle University
PA-7: Affordability and Access

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.85 / 4.00 Phillip Thompson
Director
CEJS
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have policies and programs to make it accessible and affordable to low-income students?:
Yes

A brief description of any policies and programs to minimize the cost of attendance for low-income students:

Work-study programs offer the opportunity to gain valuable work experience while earning money for college. Students are able to enhance their current course work as well as their future profession by integrating classroom learning with real-world work experience.

Seattle University also offers the following grants to those whom fit the criteria:
The Federal Pell Grant
The Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant
The Washington State Need Grant
Seattle University Grants


A brief description of any programs to equip the institution’s faculty and staff to better serve students from low-income backgrounds:

The Office for Multicultural Affairs (OMA) supports critical learning on diversity and inclusion. OMA is a key campus partner for education focused on raising awareness, cultural sensitivity, and knowledge on equity issues. OMA provides workshops and trainings for faculty, staff, and students. Focal areas for OMA workshops and trainings include:
• Increasing awareness of cultural histories and perspectives
• Understanding structural inequalities and oppression
• Exposure to minoritized experiences and narratives
• Ability to name –isms and their manifestation from an individual to societal level
• Deconstructing systems of privilege
• Developing skill sets for critical thinking, dialogue, and advocacy related to social justice
For more information:
https://www.seattleu.edu/oma/training--development/

The Wismer Office for Faculty Diversity and Inclusion infuses faculty development support and programming with attention to the needs, perspectives, and contributions of members of underrepresented groups. The office:
--coordinates faculty diversity and inclusion initiatives within Academic Affairs.
--Offers confidential consultations, conversation groups, and advocacy for diversity and equity.
--Provides workshops and support for faculty, department chairs, and deans on inclusive working environments.
--Collaborates with other offices on diversity-related initiatives and serves as a general resource to the campus regarding climate-enhancing efforts for faculty.
For more info: https://www.seattleu.edu/wismer/


A brief description of the institution’s programs to guide and prepare students and families from low-income backgrounds for higher education:

The university has created a task force charged with determining appropriate levels of loan debt and identifying ways to increase student financial literacy and help students make informed borrowing decisions.

The Outreach Center at Seattle University serves as a focal point for community building and mentorship, as well as and programming to support students who may be vulnerable, including first-generation and low-income. Programming includes the I am First Gen visibility campaign; in-person sessions, webinars, and videos for parents & families of first-generation college students; a first-generation academic journal; a first-generation guidebook; compiled book of scholarships; and personal outreach to all new first-generation students by a staff member. Additionally, services such as an emergency fund, scholarship funds to access programming, referrals to neighborhood food banks and mentoring support are available for students who are low-income.
Examples:
• Veterans Guidebook: written by Seattle University veterans for other Seattle University veterans. This guidebook is a compiled book of resources and tips for success. This guidebook is available on our website and in The Outreach Center.
• First-Gen Guidebook: written by Seattle University first-generation college students for other Seattle University first-generation college students. This guidebook is a compiled book of resources and tips for success. This guidebook is available on our website and in The Outreach Center.
• Commuter Resources:
o Lockers: lockers are available at no cost for first-year and sophomore commuter students. Lockers are available for rental for junior and senior commuter students.
o Showers: showers are available for commuter students on the 1st floor of the Student Center. Card access is required and can be requested through Public Safety.
o Meal Plans: Commuters are able to add money to their ID card to purchase meals on-campus.
o Transportation: Subsidized public transportation cards are available through Public Safety.
For more info: https://www.seattleu.edu/student-outreach/first-generation-college-students/outreach-center/


A brief description of the institution's scholarships for low-income students:

Fostering Scholars: Fostering Scholars is a full scholarship and program of support awarded to eligible students currently in or who aged-out of the foster care system. Recipients receive financial, academic, and personal support towards the completion of an undergraduate degree at Seattle University. For more information: https://www.seattleu.edu/fosteringscholars/

Costco Scholarship: In Fall of 2000, Costco joined forces with Seattle University and the University of Washington to create scholarships for underrepresented minority students. The Costco Scholarship Fund provides financial assistance to high-achieving students who wish to attend SU or UW. The fund was created by the generous contributions of many individuals and organizations through an annual fundraising event sponsored by chief executives of Costco Wholesale. The Costco Scholarship Fund is administered by the College Success Foundation, a tax exempt 501(c)(3) organization. To date this program has generated almost 25 million dollars in scholarship support for more than 1,000 scholars.

Various need-based scholarships are available by department. For example, Student Assistantships are opportunities for students to apply their studies to real jobs and responsibilities within the Fine Arts Department. Recipients are awarded scholarships for their work that are determined individually based on the level of responsibility, time commitment and financial need.


A brief description of the institution’s targeted outreach to recruit students from low-income backgrounds:

The Outreach Center at Seattle University serves as a focal point for community building and mentorship, as well as and programming to support students who may be vulnerable, including first-generation and low-income. Programming includes the "I am First Gen" visibility campaign; in-person sessions, webinars, and videos for parents & families of first-generation college students; a first-generation academic journal; a first-generation guidebook; compiled book of scholarships; and personal outreach to all new first-generation students by a staff member. Additionally, services such as an emergency fund, scholarship funds to access programming, referrals to neighborhood food banks and mentoring support are available for students who are low-income.

More information: https://www.seattleu.edu/student-outreach/first-generation-college-students/outreach-center/


A brief description of the institution’s other policies or programs to make the institution accessible and affordable to low-income students:

Fellowships (available on campus) and resources for off-campus fellowships help provide low-income students with the ability to gain financial aid and funding as well as educational and professional development. http://www.seattleu.edu/fellowships/opportunities/

Emergency funds: A Veterans Emergency Fund is available for veterans for non-tuition based emergencies. The Office of Multicultural Affairs also offers an emergency fund for non-tuition based emergencies. More info: https://www.seattleu.edu/oma/student-success-resources/financial-support--scholarships/

If a student's financial aid award in combination with what his or her family is able to contribute is not enough to meet the cost of attending Seattle University, and extenuating circumstances exist that change the student's overall financial status (such as medical and dental expenses not covered by insurance, loss of income, divorce or separation, or the costs of tuition for siblings or children attending private elementary and secondary institutions), the Student Financial Services Office will consider these to determine if the student has additional eligibility for financial aid.

Textbook Exchange: The Outreach Center offers a Textbook Exchange Program for first-gen, veterans, and low-income students who are interested in renting textbooks for the quarter. This comes at no cost for the student. Students are able to review our catalog online and fill out our online request form.

Weekly Food Initiative: The Outreach Center and The Commuter Link offer a weekly food program that makes a free meal available for students. The Commuter Link offers waffles every Wednesday morning. The Outreach Center offers quesadillas during the lunch hour every Thursday. While the day may change each quarter, there is always a weekly food offering from each space. This allows for students who may need a meal to join us for one.

Cap & Gown Closet: Graduating students who are unable to afford their cap and gown for commencement activities are able to borrow one from The Outreach Center at no cost.


Does the institution have policies and programs to support non-traditional students?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s scholarships provided specifically for part-time students:

Various graduate departments offer scholarships for part-time students that need to be enrolled in only 3 credits to be eligible.
One such example is the NSH MBA Scholarship available to U.S. citizens or permanent residents who are of Hispanic heritage in an MBA program.


A brief description of the institution’s on-site child care facility, partnership with a local facility, and/or subsidies or financial support to help meet the child care needs of students:

Seattle University does not have a child care facility or partnerships or financial support.

Lactation rooms and diaper changing facilities are available on campus.

Information and guidance is available to aid students who are parents in acquiring child-care grants. For more information: https://www.seattleu.edu/pfe/students-who-are-parents/


A brief description of the institution’s other policies and programs to support non-traditional students:

Seattle University's Outreach Center provides a wide range of support and initiatives for first-generation college students and veterans. The Outreach Center is staffed by 1 professional staff member, 1 AmeriCorps member, 2 graduate assistants, and 5 undergraduate student staff.

One of The Outreach Center’s initiatives is their visibility campaigns for both the first-gen community and veterans. The “I’M FIRST-GEN” campaign and the “I SERVED. I’m a Military Veteran.” campaign invite folks who identify as first-gen and/or a veteran to:
• Engage in conversations with members of the SU community about their experience as a first-generation college student or veteran.
• Be open to the opportunity to mentor first-generation college students or veterans at Seattle University.
• Referring students to and utilizing The Outreach Center as a place for resources, support, and community building.

The Graduate Coordinator for Student Success & Retention focuses on supporting first-generation college students. Our “First-Gen Fridays” series engages students, staff, and faculty who identify as first-generation college in issues that our first-gen community encounters. It serves as an opportunity to build community and seek guidance.

The First-Gen Mentor program is a new initiative that strives to achieve the following goals:
1) To create a meaningful relationship with a member of the first-gen student community
2) Act as an access point to university information and key resources that are not as readily available to first-gen students
3) Support the development of Outreach Center Advisors in their role as commuter advocates and student leaders

First-Gen students are assigned to an Outreach Center Advisor mentor for the academic year. Outreach Center Advisors hold monthly office hours and work 6-10 hours a week in The Outreach Center.

The Outreach Center has a Veterans Navigator and Graduate Assistant for Veterans Support & Outreach to assist veterans through their transition process at Seattle University. The Outreach Center is staffed by 2 VA Peer Advisors who current SU students who provide guidance to other veterans. Seattle University also has 3 School Certifying Officials that work with veterans and the VA to best take advantage of their VA educational benefits.

Seattle University also has a Veterans Action Committee comprised of representatives across the University to assess the ways in which the University is retaining and supporting veterans. This committee is chaired by the Dean of Students.

McGoldrick Collegium is a community space for adult learners over the age of 25 and graduate students. This space offers a kitchenette, computers, printer, lounge space, and study space.

Seattle University Student Government also has a Non-Traditional Representative that is student representative who works on amplifying and advocating for non-traditional students on campus.

For more information: https://www.seattleu.edu/student-outreach/first-generation-college-students/outreach-center/


Does the institution wish to pursue Part 2 of this credit (tracking accessibility and affordability)? (If data is not available, select 'No'):
Yes

The percentage of entering students that are low-income (0-100):
16

The graduation/success rate for low-income students (0-100):
65

On average, the percentage of need that was met for students who were awarded any need-based aid (e.g. as reported to the U.S. Common Data Set initiative, item H2) (0-100):
71

The percentage of students graduating with no interest-bearing student loan debt or for whom no out-of-pocket tuition is required (i.e. the percentage of graduates who have not taken out interest-bearing loans) (0-100):
33

Estimated percentage of students that participate in or directly benefit from the institution’s policies and programs to support low-income and non-traditional students (0-100):
68

The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.