Overall Rating Silver
Overall Score 49.64
Liaison Adam Maurer
Submission Date March 31, 2021

STARS v2.2

Seattle Central College
AC-8: Campus as a Living Laboratory

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 4.00 / 4.00 Adam Maurer
District Sustainability Coordinator
Office of Sustainability
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Campus Engagement?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Campus Engagement:

In fall 2019, several students expressed interest in bike infrastructure. They met with our District Transportation Coordinator on several occasions. The students toured the main campus with the District Transportation Coordinator to assess bike infrastructure, like bike racks, lockers, shower facilities, etc. The students organized a public forum to share their findings and recommendations. They made recommendations on types and locations for bike lockers on main campus. They took attendance and handed out a short survey to all attendees.


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Public Engagement?:
No

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Public Engagement:
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Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Air & Climate?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Air & Climate:

In spring 2018, student intern Sam Lunsford used GRITS, an online platform for tracking resource usage and associated outcomes. She entered data acquired before and after specific capital projects, including water efficiency, and was able to determine energy, water, and emissions savings. This was correlated with financial savings, calculating payback, and return on investment. Not only did the results display sustainability in action, but the data can be used as financial incentive to invest in more sustainable projects.


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Buildings?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Buildings:

In early 2018, a team of five students worked alongside contractors hired to conduct our City of Seattle Building Tune-Up on our Sicence and Math (SAM) building. The did a comprehensive assessment and analysis of the building's interior and exterior lighting, HVAC, safety, envelope, thermal and acoustic comfort, etc.


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Energy?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Energy:

In spring 2018, student intern Sam Lunsford used GRITS, an online platform for tracking resource usage and associated outcomes. She entered data acquired before and after specific capital projects, including water efficiency, and was able to determine energy, water, and emissions savings. This was correlated with financial savings, calculating payback, and return on investment. Not only did the results display sustainability in action, but the data can be used as financial incentive to invest in more sustainable projects.


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Food & Dining?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Food & Dining:

In spring 2020, student Emily Meade completed a "SCA Food Recovery Plan." Her project objective was to "create a sustainable and efficient food recovery system for Seattle Culinary Academy (SCA)." SCA plans to revive this plan after COVID-19 and when we return to more normal operations.


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Grounds?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Grounds:

From seed to maturity, Seattle Culinary Academy students learn all about edible gardening in our new Plant Science Lab (PSL)/green house. Focus is on herb identification and the delicious contribution each makes to the recipes prepared in our kitchens back at the SCA. Seattle Culinary Academy also works collaboratively with the Science and Math department to plant and utilize heritage seeds from Seed Savers Exchange, a nationally recognized organization of people who are committed to "collecting, conserving and sharing heirloom seeds and plants, while educating people about the value of genetic and cultural diversity."


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Purchasing?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Purchasing:

Several Seattle Culinary Academy courses require students to create local and seasonally available menus for which the students have to source the ingredients. This proves their menu can be created with ethically and environmentally conscious ingredients.


IIs the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Transportation?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Transportation:

In fall 2019, several students expressed interest in bike infrastructure. They met with our District Transportation Coordinator on several occasions. The students toured the main campus with the District Transportation Coordinator to assess bike infrastructure, like bike racks, lockers, shower facilities, etc. The students organized a public forum to share their findings and recommendations. They made recommendations on types and locations for bike lockers on main campus. They took attendance and handed out a short survey to all attendees.


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Waste?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Waste:

In fall 2019, Zari Akkuly, student and Office of Sustainability Intern, completed a comprehensive assessment of all break rooms on the main campus titled, "Seattle Central College Break Room Waste Assessment Report." The objective was to improve waste management practices in staff break rooms across campus, which includes adding compost bins to all applicable areas. Zari inspected all break rooms, catalogued existing infrastructure, and made recommendations on how to improve waste management practices in each area. She inspected 37 break rooms and noted 28 did not have compost bins and 11 did not have adequate recycling bins.


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Water?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Water:

In spring 2018, student intern Sam Lunsford used GRITS, an online platform for tracking resource usage and associated outcomes. She entered data acquired before and after specific capital projects, including water efficiency, and was able to determine energy, water, and emissions savings. This was correlated with financial savings, calculating payback, and return on investment. Not only did the results display sustainability in action, but the data can be used as financial incentive to invest in more sustainable projects.


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Coordination & Planning?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Coordination & Planning:

In spring 2020, student Emily Meade completed a "SCA Food Recovery Plan." Her project objective was to "create a sustainable and efficient food recovery system for Seattle Culinary Academy (SCA)." A food recovery plan is complex and required coordination between SCA students, faculty, FareStart (external partner), Work Study program, The Buzz (small bakery/coffee shop run by SCA), and the Seattle Central Pantry. The students project connected a lot of dots in this web of stakeholders and has laid the ground work for a coordinated effort to reduce food waste once we return to more normal operations after COVID-19.


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Diversity & Affordability?:
Yes

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Diversity & Affordability:

In May 2019, The student Issues and Concerns committee faciltated a pilot program that would provide free menstrual products in campus bathrooms. With an initial investment of $96 and some student donations, 12 bathrooms were supplied with these products. The pilot program received positive feedback from students, faculty, and staff. The pilot program included and is now recommending adoption of Aunt Flow's products, which are 100% biodegradable and are made with 100% organic cotton. Biodegradability is important for sustainability, and organic cotton is necessary for student health. Typical pads and tampons often contain dioxins, which the World Health Organization has stated “cause hormone issues, issues with the immune system, developmental problems and reproductive issues such as endometriosis, painful periods and even infertility”, as well as being associated with a higher risk of cancer ("Dioxins and Their Effects on Human Health”). Products have a shelf life of three years, which should not be a concern.


Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Investment & Finance?:
No

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Investment & Finance:
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Is the institution utilizing its infrastructure and operations as a living laboratory for applied student learning for sustainability in relation to Wellbeing & Work?:
No

A brief description of the projects and how they contribute to understanding or advancing sustainability in relation to Wellbeing & Work:
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Website URL where information about the institution’s living laboratory program is available:
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Additional documentation to support the submission:
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The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.