Overall Rating Bronze
Overall Score 35.40
Liaison David Liebman
Submission Date Feb. 28, 2019
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

Santa Rosa Junior College
OP-11: Sustainable Procurement

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.00 / 3.00 Laura Rivera
Director of Purchasing
Purchasing
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have written policies, guidelines or directives that seek to support sustainable purchasing across commodity categories institution-wide?:
Yes

A copy of the policies, guidelines or directives:
---

The policies, guidelines or directives:

5.8.9

ENVIRONMENTALLY PREFERABLE PURCHASING POLICY

ADOPT: FEBRUARY 8, 2011

CATEGORY 2 REVISION: MAY 14, 2013

It is the policy of the Sonoma County Junior College District to institute practices that assure the procurement or acquisition of goods and services have a lesser or reduced effect on human health and the environment when compared with competing goods or services that serve the same purpose. The District’s procurement and acquisition practices will take into consideration, to the extent feasible, raw materials acquisition, production, manufacturing, packaging, distribution, reuse, operation, maintenance, disposal, energy efficiency, product performance, durability, safety, the needs of the end user, delivery, and cost.

This policy is adopted in order to:

1. conserve natural resources and minimize environmental impacts such as pollution, water and energy use, and landfills waste;

2. eliminate or reduce toxins that may create hazards to our community;

3. support strong recycling markets;

4. increase the use of environmentally preferable products;

5. create a model for successfully purchasing environmentally preferable products that encourages other purchasers in our community to adopt similar goals.

Nothing contained in this policy shall be construed as requiring a department, purchaser, or contractor to procure products that do not perform adequately for their intended use, exclude adequate competition, or are unavailable at a reasonable price in a reasonable period of time.

Nothing contained in this policy shall be construed as requiring the District, department, purchaser or contractor to take any action that conflicts with local, state or federal requirements.


Does the institution employ Life Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA) when evaluating energy- and water-using products and systems?:
Yes

Which of the following best describes the institution’s use of LCCA?:
Institution employs LCCA as a matter of policy and standard practice when evaluating all energy- and water-using products, systems and building components

A brief description of the LCCA policy and/or practices:

Sonoma County Junior College District Board Policy Manual
6.8.7P
District Energy Guidelines
Adopt: November 12, 2003
Reviewed: December 9, 2008
Revised: June 12, 2012
1. Energy Efficiency Improvement
a. The District will develop and implement a program with the intent of reducing energy consumption to the extent that these measures are life-cycle-cost effective.
b. The District’s implementation program will be designed to speed the introduction of cost-effective, energy-efficient technologies into college facilities, such as indoor temperatures between 68 degrees Fahrenheit to 78 degrees Fahrenheit or facility closure during District closures.

2. Reduction of Greenhouse Gases and Other Air Pollutants
a. Through life-cycle cost-effective energy measures, the District will reduce its greenhouse gas emissions attributed to facility energy use.

3. Reduction of Fossil Fuel Use
a. Through life-cycle cost-effective measures, the district will reduce the use of fossil fuels within District facilities.

4. Expansion of Renewable Energy and Distributed Generation
a. The district will strive to expand the use of renewable energy (including passive solar, solar thermal, solar electric, wind, geothermal, biomass) and other distributed generation technologies (fuel cells) within District facilities and in college activities by implementing alternative energy projects and by purchasing electricity from renewable energy sources.
5. Improved Transportation Efficiency
a. The District will continue to strive to reduce petroleum consumption through improvements in fleet fuel efficiency and the use of alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) and alternative fuels.
b. The District will continue to promote and strive to improve access to alternative modes of transportation, including public transportation, carpooling, bicycling and walking.
6. Water Conservation
a. Through life-cycle cost-effective measures, the District will reduce water consumption and associated energy use in college facilities to reach goals to be determined.
7. Environmental Sensitive Building Materials
a. The District, wherever feasible, will utilize environmentally sensitive building and construction materials that are both energy efficient and have a minimal or no negative impact.

Energy Management Performance Criteria

1. Maximize opportunities for saving energy through building orientation considerations, daylighting and lighting controls, and efficient lighting and mechanical systems.

2. Achieve increasing levels of energy performance (on a case-by-case basis) above the minimum level of energy efficiency as prescribed by State of California standards (Title 24)
3. Verify and ensure that fundamental building elements and systems are designed, constructed, installed and calibrated to operate as intended to achieve energy level performance goals.
4. Encourage and recognize increasing levels of self-supply (when feasible) through renewable technologies to reduce environmental impacts associated with fossil fuel energy use.
5. Require District suppliers and contractors to commit to similar environmental standards and work in partnership with them to ensure that facilities and operations incorporate the highest level of environmental protection through efficient energy management.
6. Ensure that all appropriate personnel that work with energy equipment or are involved in energy-related decisions will receive training for implementing this policy.


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating chemically intensive products and services (e.g. building and facilities maintenance, cleaning and sanitizing, landscaping and grounds maintenance)?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for chemically intensive products and services:
---

Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating construction and renovation products (e.g. furnishings and building materials)?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for construction and renovation products:

The Santa Rosa Junior College Facilities Master Plan have sustainability based design guidelines and technical standards outlined in them. See section 4.3 (Starting on Pg. 89) and Section 5.4 (Starting on Pg.126) in the documents linked below, as well as excerpts from them below.

Design Standards: https://bond.santarosa.edu/sites/bond.santarosa.edu/files/SCJCD%2004_Design%20Guidelines%20FINAL.pdf:
Technical Standards: https://bond.santarosa.edu/sites/bond.santarosa.edu/files/SCJCD%2005_Technical%20Guidelines%20FINAL.pdf

The above mentioned master plan sets sustainability focused guidelines for construction/renovation and design. The following is an except from the Facilities Master Plan:

"To truly embrace the value of sustainability, equal consideration must be given to environmental, social, and economic excellence. Specifically in support of the District’s Strategic Plan Goal E: “The establishment of a culture of sustainability,” we require the thorough assessment and analysis of environmental stewardship, social equity, and economic management for all projects. The ten guiding principles listed below and described in this section should be taken into account for all day to day operations as well as when designing and constructing capital projects for SCJCD.:
1. Use an Integrated Approach to Building Design, Construction and Operations
2. Implement an Ecological Site Design Methodology
3. Reduce Fossil Fuel Reliance and Related Energy Costs
4. Manage Water Carefully
5. Source Materials and Services Responsibly
6. Optimize Occupant Comfort , Health and Well Being
7. Reduce Waste
8. Use the Built Environment as a Teaching Tool
9. Facilitate Sustainable Management of Campus Operations
10. Showcase Sustainability Leadership"

As Mentioned above the Facilities Master plan sets sustainability focused technical standards for the College. The following is an excerpt from that document:

"The SCJCD Sustainable Design & Construction Standards apply to all capital projects and should be included in all Requests for Proposals issued for new projects, including new buildings, major renovations, interior fit-outs, system upgrades and other related infrastructure projects. In addition, these standards should be referenced in contracts for design related and construction management services. Application of these standards in projects is intended to help establish SCJCD as a recognized leader in green building and sustainable campus operations. They are an essential component of the District’s commitment to sustainability, including its desire to use it’s facilities as a teaching tool for behavior change and sustainable practices. These standards identify a minimum level of design and process requirements for all new construction and renovation projects, while providing enough flexibility for individual project teams to meet project goals. The Standards also include recommendations (stretch goals) that project teams should attempt to achieve. Recognizing that different project scopes represent different levels of sustainable design opportunity and operational impact, the sustainability standards are organized within four different project tiers.
Tier 1: Tier 1 projects include all new buildings and major building renovations with a comprehensive scope that includes room configuration modifications, new HVAC systems, envelope modifications, and new lighting.
Tier 2: Tier 2 projects are partial renovations or fit-outs of existing facilities in which systems within the renovated spaces are largely replaced (e.g. lighting, finishes, plumbing, and/or HVAC), but base building HVAC systems and the building envelope generally remain unaffected.
Tier 3: Tier 3 projects include renovations to systems with an energy impact but are focused only on those systems (e.g. renewable energy installation, HVAC upgrades, AHU replacement, lighting replacement, etc.)
Tier 4: Tier 4 projects have no or limited energy and GHG impact, such as installing bike lanes or other landscape renovation project or an interior project which only renovates finishes and furnishings."

As Mentioned in the excerpt there are multiple tiers of projects and the master plan goes on to state in more depth what each of these projects should try to achieve when it comes to each of the design guidelines listed above.

Additionally, the California Community Colleges Board of Governors produced an Energy and Sustainability Policy which SRJC is obliged to adhere to:
https://extranet.cccco.edu/Portals/1/CFFP/Sustainability/BOG_Energy_Sustainability_Policy_FINAL.pdf


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating Information technology (IT) products and services (e.g. computers, imaging equipment, mobile phones, data centers and cloud services)?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for IT products and services:
---

Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating food services (i.e. franchises, vending services, concessions, convenience stores)?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for food services:

The below points are what SRJC has in our contact with the food vendor.

1.9 Sustainability

1.91 Food Service Products and Packaging: Contractor shall make every effort to use environmentally friendly food service products and use only 100% recyclable or 100% compostable products.

1.92 Contractor shall use green, environmentally friendly cleaning and sanitizing products.

1.93 Contractor agrees to work closely with SRJC Shone Farm as a supplier of fresh Produce.

1.94 Contractor shall use local food producers and suppliers whenever possible.

1.95 Contractor shall provide periodic reports to the District on its sustainable practices

1.96 Contractor shall work with the District to educate students and staff on sustainable food practices and to promote same.


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating garments and linens?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for garments and linens:
---

Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating professional services (e.g. architectural, engineering, public relations, financial)?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for professional services:
---

Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating transportation and fuels (e.g. travel, vehicles, delivery services, long haul transport, generator fuels, steam plants)?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for transportation and fuels:
---

Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating wood and paper products?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for wood and paper products:
---

Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating products and services in other commodity categories that the institution has determined to have significant sustainability impacts?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for other commodity categories:
---

The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
---

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.