Overall Rating Expired
Overall Score Expired
Liaison Debbie Andres
Submission Date Aug. 26, 2016
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

San Jose State University
OP-8: Building Energy Consumption

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete Expired Debbie Andres
Utilities & Sustainability Analyst
FD&O
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Total building energy consumption, all sources (transportation fuels excluded):
Performance Year Baseline Year
Total building energy consumption 615056 MMBtu 650644 MMBtu

Purchased electricity and steam:
Performance Year Baseline Year
Grid-purchased electricity 40648 MMBtu 53621 MMBtu
District steam/hot water 574408 MMBtu 597023 MMBtu

Gross floor area of building space::
Performance Year Baseline Year
Gross floor area 6729349 Gross Square Feet 6510284 Gross Square Feet

Floor area of energy intensive space, performance year::
Floor Area
Laboratory space 407500 Square Feet
Healthcare space 13944 Square Feet
Other energy intensive space

Degree days, performance year (base 65 °F)::
Degree days (see help icon above)
Heating degree days 1910
Cooling degree days 765

Source-site ratios::
Source-Site Ratio (see help icon above)
Grid-purchased electricity 3.14
District steam/hot water 1.20

Start and end dates of the performance year and baseline year (or 3-year periods)::
Start Date End Date
Performance Year Jan. 1, 2015 Dec. 31, 2015
Baseline Year Jan. 1, 2010 Dec. 31, 2010

A brief description of when and why the building energy consumption baseline was adopted:

First year with complete data for all energy consumption on main and south campus.


A brief description of any building temperature standards employed by the institution:

The campus Central Energy Management & Controls System (CECMS) is programmed with building operating schedules that control the HVAC systems. The Air Handling Units turn on in the morning and off in the evening as commanded by these schedules. Individual thermostats are not common as they do not fit in with the energy management practice of centralized HVAC control which is tasked to operators at the campus Central Plant.
Building temperature standards are regulated by CSU Executive Order 987 and the CSU Sustainability Policy.
http://www.calstate.edu/eo/EO-987.html
http://www.calstate.edu/cpdc/sustainability/policies-reports/documents/JointMeeting-CPBG-ED.pdf


A brief description of any light emitting diode (LED) lighting employed by the institution:

In Washington Square Hall room 109, a large lecture hall, LEDs were used to replace the old HPS overhead pendant lamps.
All campus exterior lighting was recently converted to LED lighting.
MLK Library has undergone an LED lighting retrofit.


A brief description of any occupancy and/or vacancy sensors employed by the institution:

Lighting sensors are used in several buildings on campus. In King Library, all the book stacks have occupancy sensors that shut off all lights except outlying lamps when no one is browsing the shelf. In Clark Hall, most of the classrooms have occupancy sensors that shut off the lights after 15 minutes no use. Student Union, Student Health, SPX and YUH, Campus Village 1 and 2 all employ occupancy sensors.


A brief description of any passive solar heating employed by the institution:
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A brief description of any ground-source heat pumps employed by the institution:
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A brief description of any cogeneration technologies employed by the institution:

At SJSU's Central Plant, the university owns and operates a highly efficient Cheng Cycle Cogeneration unit with a capacity of 6 MW. This consists of a natural gas fired turbine and a Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG). On an annual basis, Cogen provides about 80% of the electricity for campus and nearly 100% of the steam load for building space heating and domestic hot water.


A brief description of any building recommissioning or retrofit program employed by the institution:

Monitoring Based Commissioning has been used for several of our buildings with the plant to eventually do all of our buildings and keep the buildings on a 5 year schedule.
Buildings that have undergone MBCx include, Business Classroom, Duncan Hall, Central Classroom, Engineering, Chiller Plant, MLK Library, Moss Landing Marine Lab, Sweeney Hall, Art, Music, MacQuarrie Hall, Dwight Bentel Hall.


A brief description of any energy metering and management systems employed by the institution:

The campus Central Energy Management & Controls System (CECMS) is programmed with building operating schedules that control the HVAC systems. The Air Handling Units turn on in the morning and off in the evening as commanded by these schedules. The CECMS system consists of both legacy Barber Coleman hardware with an Invue front end and newer JACES with a Tridium front end. These systems are also used to implement Demand Response manually.


A brief description of the institution's program to replace energy-consuming appliances, equipment and systems with high efficiency alternatives:

All appliances, equipment and systems are regularly evaluated for replacement. When a piece of equipment is determined to need replacement, we work with PG&E to determine incentives available and recommended energy efficient equipment.


A brief description of any energy-efficient landscape design initiatives employed by the institution:
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A brief description of any vending machine sensors, lightless machines, or LED-lit machines employed by the institution:
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A brief description of other energy conservation and efficiency initiatives employed by the institution:

Campus PR campaigns include a Housing Competition to see which dorm could reduce the most energy use by behavioral changes and the "Campus Energy Challenge" which pitted individual colleges to reduce usage in a specific building.


The website URL where information about the institution’s energy conservation and efficiency initiatives is available:

District steam and hot water is gas purchased.

Suggestion for awarding of points: this should be a metric as opposed to a % reduction to a baseline. This way of calculating points would hypothetically award more points to an energy inefficient college who reduced usage to be a little less inefficient than a college that has always been energy efficient. Perhaps use a metric like BTU/SF or have a college get an Energy Star rating and use that metric/rating to award points. This calculation penalizes colleges that have been energy efficient for years and awards those who have just started on energy efficiency measures.

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.