Overall Rating Bronze
Overall Score 32.08
Liaison Theresa Ladrigan-Whelpley
Submission Date June 29, 2023

STARS v2.2

Salve Regina University
OP-20: Hazardous Waste Management

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 0.75 / 1.00
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have strategies in place to safely dispose of all hazardous, special (e.g. coal ash), universal, and non-regulated chemical waste and seek to minimize the presence of these materials on campus?:
Yes

A brief description of steps taken to reduce hazardous, special (e.g. coal ash), universal, and non-regulated chemical waste:
Hazardous waste: SRU generates hazardous wastes in chemistry and biology teaching laboratories. Academic programs occasionally review laboratory protocols to identify areas in which the usage of hazardous materials could be minimized. A few examples include substituting water for cyclohexane in a CHM305 experiment and reducing volumes in organic chemistry to semi-micro levels.

Universal waste: SRU collects universal wastes from buildings and departments and (Jared, you can fill this in). Typical universal wastes include mercury fluorescent bulbs, old mercury thermostats etc. For new construction/renovation SRU installs LED lighting to minimize the prevalence of mercury.

SRU produces no special wastes.

Non-regulated chemical wastes are typically generated in academic teaching labs. As with hazardous wastes, these programs are occasionally reviewed to identify areas where waste can be minimized.

A brief description of how the institution safely disposes of hazardous, universal, and non-regulated chemical waste:
Hazardous and non-regulated chemical wastes: SRU complies with all Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management (RI-DEM) regulations pertaining to waste disposal. We operate satellite accumulation areas in the following teaching labs: (WILL, please fill in) and one main accumulation area (MAA) in O’Hare 146B. In compliance with our Small Quantity Generator (SQG) status, hazardous wastes are shipped at least every 180 days. SRU generates wastes well below the RI-DEM requirements for an SQG (less than 1000 kg of non-acutely hazardous waste and less than 1 kg acutely hazardous waste). Non-regulated chemical wastes are shipped during the hazardous waste lab packs.

SRU collects all regulated medical wastes (RMW) primarily from biology and nursing laboratories as well as health services. All RMWs are packaged and shipped on a RMW manifest by our waste vendor.

SRU employs Triumvirate Environmental Services for all shipments of hazardous, non-hazardous wastes as well as RMWs. Universal wastes and waste oil is shipped off site under contract with (Jared, are we still using Kwik Clean? Or whatever it was). Waste cooking oil is collected, refined and repurposed by Newport Biodiesel.

Training: SRU has a minimum of three employees trained for RCRA waste management (8 hour course); Department of Transportation (DOT) (12 hour course) and numerous employees with HAZWOPER. In addition, all laboratory instructors are provided training to handle laboratory generated hazardous wastes.

A brief description of any significant hazardous material release incidents during the previous three years, including volume, impact and response/remediation:
SRU has had no significant spills or releases of hazardous materials in recent years.

A brief description of any inventory system employed by the institution to facilitate the reuse or redistribution of laboratory chemicals:
The Chemistry Department maintains a subscription to ChemInventory LTD for cataloging, organizing and tracking our chemical inventory. The database currently lists approximately 1250 items. Items in the inventory are barcoded and shelved according to hazard class. Chemical inventories are located in O’Hare 145A and O’Hare 146A. In addition to maintaining a database of chemical inventory, ChemInventory also stores and organizes digital Safety Data Sheets (SDS) for all materials in inventory. Print copies of SDS are also available and posted in the stockrooms.

Does the institution have or participate in a program to responsibly recycle, reuse, and/or refurbish electronic waste generated by the institution?:
Yes

Does the institution have or participate in a program to responsibly recycle, reuse, and/or refurbish electronic waste generated by students?:
No

A brief description of the electronic waste recycling program(s), including information about how electronic waste generated by the institution and/or students is recycled:
Currently, all university electronic assets are collected by the Office of Information Technology (OIT) and repurposed or reallocated if this is a viable option. When assets are out of date or too damaged to be reallocated they are collected and turned over to our vendor, iTad Concepts for recycling. Information about iTad Concepts and their process is supplied below.

Student e-waste notes: Not currently, but the university and our e-waste vendor have expressed interest in expanding our e-waste collection to include Faculty/staff and student generated electronics.

Is the institution’s electronic waste recycler certified under the e-Stewards and/or Responsible Recycling (R2) standards?:
Yes

Website URL where information about the institution’s hazardous waste program is available:
---

Additional documentation to support the submission:
---

Data source(s) and notes about the submission:
Information from iTad Concepts with respect to this question are as follows: iTad Concepts abides by R2 Recycling Standards and works directly with The Rhode Island Resource Recovery Department at the Johnston Landfill to properly recycle any and all TV’s, Printers, Monitors, Cables or any other material that requires proper disposal. Our program is centered on reuse and repurposing of retired IT equipment and components to the extent that they are able to be reused based on functionality and demand in the secondary market.

ITad Concepts dismantles all machines on-site and test on-site as well and works with a network of consumers of trailing-edge technology. ITad believe reuse is the most environmentally sound and responsible method of recycling to ensure downstream responsibility. ITad works directly with scrap metals and plastics recyclers to ensure that any materials that do not represent any secondary usage are properly handled and disposed of and in turn, are eventually repurposed to manufacture other non-tech related goods.

Information from iTad Concepts with respect to this question are as follows: iTad Concepts abides by R2 Recycling Standards and works directly with The Rhode Island Resource Recovery Department at the Johnston Landfill to properly recycle any and all TV’s, Printers, Monitors, Cables or any other material that requires proper disposal. Our program is centered on reuse and repurposing of retired IT equipment and components to the extent that they are able to be reused based on functionality and demand in the secondary market.

ITad Concepts dismantles all machines on-site and test on-site as well and works with a network of consumers of trailing-edge technology. ITad believe reuse is the most environmentally sound and responsible method of recycling to ensure downstream responsibility. ITad works directly with scrap metals and plastics recyclers to ensure that any materials that do not represent any secondary usage are properly handled and disposed of and in turn, are eventually repurposed to manufacture other non-tech related goods.

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution or simply email your inquiry to stars@aashe.org.