Overall Rating Expired
Overall Score Expired
Liaison Kristina Bryan
Submission Date Feb. 26, 2015
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

Saint Louis University
OP-27: Rainwater Management

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete Expired Brandon Verhoff
Director
Sustainability & Benchmarking
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution use Low Impact Development (LID) practices as a matter of policy or standard practice to reduce rainwater/stormwater runoff volume and improve outgoing water quality for new construction, major renovation, and other projects?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s Low Impact Development (LID) practices:

Practices present on campus include: native landscaping and native plantings in new construction areas, rain barrel collection, permeable pavers and pervious paths, extensive green roof, bio-retention areas and rain gardens.


Has the institution adopted a rainwater/stormwater management policy, plan, or strategies that mitigate the rainwater runoff impacts of ongoing campus operations through the use of green infrastructure? :
No

A brief description of the institution’s rainwater/stormwater management policy, plan, and/or strategies for ongoing campus operations:

None currently available


A brief description of any rainwater harvesting employed by the institution:

The Rainworks Stormwater garden (BPM) installed in 2014 contains three 50 gallon rain barrels with an overflow option. These are used for drip irrigation to water the surrounding plants.

We do not currently have meters attached to the rain barrels at the BPM garden to collect this data, but it is estimated to divert 7,473 cubic feet of water from this project from the storm drains.


Rainwater harvested directly and stored/used by the institution, performance year:
---

A brief description of any rainwater filtering systems employed by the institution to treat water prior to release:

Rainworks stormwater management garden (BPM), installed in April 2014, was designed with two biorentention areas surrounding two inlets to the combined sewer system for the area with underdrains installed. The areas were designed to capture water with a maximum ponding depth of 10 inches with a filter bed to attenuate, filter, and infiltrate water.


A brief description of any living or vegetated roofs on campus:

As part of the construction of SLU’s Doisy Research Center, approximately 7,200 square feet of vegetation was installed on the building. This “green roof” is an extensive system (4”) and is planted with five (5) varieties of sedum. These varieties were chosen based on their survivability in a vegetative roof environment.
For more information, please visit:
http://www.slu.edu/facilities-services-home/sustainability/campus-operations/buildings-and-grounds#Stormwater management


A brief description of any porous (i.e. permeable) paving employed by the institution:

Honeycomb grass paver systems, installed at both the Medical Center Recreation Complex and the Doisy Research Center, services parking for emergency and service vehicles.

Rainworks stormwater management garden (BPM), installed in 2014, utilized flagstone to create a pervious path in the high traffic location covering a total area of 250 square feet.


A brief description of any downspout disconnection employed by the institution:

Rainworks Stormwater Management Garden (BPM), installed in April 2014, employs the use of rain barrels attached to three downspouts of the covered walkway in the area. Prior to implementation, 4 downspouts existed that extended to just off the ground. It was determined that one of the downspouts could be closed off and the other three were connected to rain barrels that have an overflow option. In the winter, the rain barrels are removed and the downspouts are extended so that the water is released, splashes onto the concrete pads and the overflow pipe is capped.


A brief description of any rain gardens on campus:

Rainworks stormwater management garden (BPM), installed in April 2014, utilizes 3 rain barrels, 2 biorentional areas, and a pervious path in an area of campus that has been prone to flooding and erosion. The entire area affected by the garden is 2,585 square feet and it is estimated to divert 7,473 cubic feet of water from the combined sewer system. Native plants that were known to aid in stormwater management were utilized in the project.

A native wildflower garden was also planted between Beracha and Fusz Halls which utilizes pervious stone pavers for walking paths, creating a method of diverting water from an over saturated location of campus.


A brief description of any stormwater retention and/or detention ponds employed by the institution:

Rainworks stormwater management garden (BPM), installed in April 2014, was designed with two biorentention areas surrounding two inlets to the combined sewer system for the area with underdrains installed. The areas were designed to capture water with a maximum ponding depth of 10 inches with a filter bed (75 square feet) to attenuate, filter, and infiltrate water. Each area has a total storage of 350 cubic feet of water.


A brief description of any bioswales on campus (vegetated, compost or stone):

N/A


A brief description of any other rainwater management technologies or strategies employed by the institution:

N/A


The website URL where information about the institution’s rainwater management initiatives, plan or policy is available:

Rainwater management is an aspect that is a work in progress for us and we will continue to increase implementation of best practices in this area going forward. No formal policy or standard is currently available.

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.