Overall Rating Silver
Overall Score 54.26
Liaison Stephanie MacPhee
Submission Date Dec. 9, 2020
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

Ryerson University
OP-11: Sustainable Procurement

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 1.00 / 3.00
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have written policies, guidelines or directives that seek to support sustainable purchasing across commodity categories institution-wide?:
Yes

A copy of the policies, guidelines or directives:
The policies, guidelines or directives:

Section 2d of Ryerson's Purchasing Policy incorporates the following guiding principle to support sustainable purchasing:
Buying with Impact - The University shall leverage its purchasing power to create social, sustainable, and economic value in diverse communities by seeking out and utilizing diverse suppliers across the University.

The full policy can be found here: https://www.ryerson.ca/policies/policy-list/purchasing-policy/

Ryerson released the following statement regarding its most recent social procurement initiative in 2020:
Every purchase the university makes carries an economic, environmental and social impact. So when we make purchases with social procurement as a consideration, we are intentionally placing social value alongside economic value in our decision-making process.

This initiative is part of an ongoing partnership between Financial Services and the Office of the Vice-President, Equity and Community Inclusion (OVPECI) to develop a Social Procurement Program and corresponding policies for Ryerson.

Canadian Aboriginal and Minority Supplier Council (CAMSC)
As a member of CAMSC, Ryerson has access to a range of products and services from Indigenous and and racialized-owned businesses that operate in Canada. These suppliers are vetted by CAMSC certification, external link, which includes the criteria that the business is at least 51% owned, managed and controlled by an Indigenous Person(s) or racialized person(s).

Not only will this enable the university to diversify the supply chain within which Ryerson conducts business, but also allows us to support the CAMSC’s efforts to increase engagement, inclusion and utilization of products and services from its diverse network.

As outlined by the CAMSC, the current economic climate in Canada has “led the private sector to assume a more active role within the communities in which they do business.” Strong partnerships between government, institutions, major corporations and small businesses will allow for a more “equitable distribution of wealth, the creation of employment opportunities, and creation of an expanded customer base.”

This new partnership means that Ryerson employees, faculties and departments making purchasing decisions now have access to over 450 certified suppliers in the CAMSC network.

How Purchasing Services can support you
Wherever possible, Purchasing Services will proactively prioritize suppliers from the CAMSC network on behalf of Ryerson. Our purchasing analysts will be reviewing our vendor spends across the university to identify opportunities to engage vendors from CAMSC.

If you are beginning a new procurement process, contact Purchasing Services who will review the list of CAMSC suppliers and provide you recommendations and support.

Selecting suppliers from the CAMSC network means we can make purchases with the confidence that our choice invests in the advancement of Indigenous and racialized communities.

Additional social procurement initiatives and partnerships
The university is also a named partner in the AnchorTO, external link network—a City of Toronto community of practice project for public sector institutions. By participating in the network, Ryerson has committed to leveraging its procurement and investments to achieve inclusive economic development outcomes.

In 2019, Ryerson participated along with the University of Toronto and AnchorTO in a MaRS innovation project entitled Buying With Impact, external link. Together, we developed a playbook to guide post-secondary institutions in the Greater Toronto Area in procuring more goods and services from social enterprises. The playbook will play a strong role as Ryerson formalizes its social procurement policy at the university.


Does the institution employ Life Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA) when evaluating energy- and water-using products and systems?:
Yes

Which of the following best describes the institution’s use of LCCA?:
Institution employs LCCA less comprehensively, e.g. for certain types of systems or projects and not others

A brief description of the LCCA policy and/or practices:

The following language is included in our RFPs and Scope of Work for capital and deferred maintenance projects with potential energy impacts:

Life Cycle Cost Analysis Requirements:
Life Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA) should be performed to quantify the 20 year impacts on GHG, energy costs, maintenance costs, etc. The results of the energy modeling may be used to perform Life Cycle Cost Analyses and/or Parametric analyses.
Models of up to (3) three design options for the upgrades.
Because of uncertainty of energy prices and the lifetime of typical components, life cycle cost analysis for energy purposes will typically be done over a 20-year period. The Ryerson Project Team shall define the discount rates and the acceptable Rate of Interest/Return on Investment (ROI) and lifetimes to be used for any LCCA analyses required.


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating chemically intensive products and services (e.g. building and facilities maintenance, cleaning and sanitizing, landscaping and grounds maintenance)?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for chemically intensive products and services:
---

Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating construction and renovation products (e.g. furnishings and building materials)?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for construction and renovation products:
---

Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating Information technology (IT) products and services (e.g. computers, imaging equipment, mobile phones, data centers and cloud services)?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for IT products and services:
---

Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating food services (i.e. franchises, vending services, concessions, convenience stores)?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for food services:
---

Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating garments and linens?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for garments and linens:
---

Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating professional services (e.g. architectural, engineering, public relations, financial)?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for professional services:
---

Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating transportation and fuels (e.g. travel, vehicles, delivery services, long haul transport, generator fuels, steam plants)?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for transportation and fuels:
---

Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating wood and paper products?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for wood and paper products:
---

Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating products and services in other commodity categories that the institution has determined to have significant sustainability impacts?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for other commodity categories:
---

The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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