Overall Rating Expired
Overall Score Expired
Liaison Susan Dorward
Submission Date April 14, 2015
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

Raritan Valley Community College
PA-2: Sustainability Planning

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete Expired Susan Dorward
Sustainability and Energy Coordinator
Facilities and Grounds
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have current and formal plans to advance sustainability in the following areas? Do the plans include measurable objectives?:
Current and Formal Plans (Yes or No) Measurable Objectives (Yes or No)
Curriculum Yes Yes
Research (or other scholarship) No No
Campus Engagement Yes Yes
Public Engagement Yes Yes
Air and Climate Yes Yes
Buildings Yes Yes
Dining Services/Food No No
Energy Yes Yes
Grounds Yes Yes
Purchasing Yes Yes
Transportation Yes Yes
Waste Yes Yes
Water Yes Yes
Diversity and Affordability Yes Yes
Health, Wellbeing and Work No No
Investment No No
Other No No

A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Curriculum:

The 5-year program review of the Environmental Science program was written in 2014. The document includes Section 1 - Introduction
Section 2 - Mission and Goals
Section 3 - Curriculum
Section 4 - Statistical Data
Section 5 - Program Evaluation, Assessment of Student Learning
Section 6 - Program Evaluation Summary
Appendix

Goals are tied to the strategic plan. The program evaluation presents several action items: adding a lab component, the need for additional lab materials and equipment, the need for dedicated space to provide scheduling flexibility, and the need for more student outreach.

+ Date Revised: May 19, 2015

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Curriculum plan(s):

The current backbone and strength of the A.S. program curriculum is in the wide array of field- and context-based environmental science and field biology offerings, which have been largely developed or enhanced during the past five years under the direction of Dr. Jay Kelly. This has led to dramatic enrollment in environmental and field biology classes overall, the growth of which was recognized by RVCC in its hiring of Dr. Emilie Stander, whom is an excellent addition to the program and will support and further develop these course and program offerings in the future. Recent developments made by Dr. Lenahan in the General Biology II (BIOL-102) curricula, greatly enhancing the ecology and evolution components, and by Dr. Sarah Imbriglio, with lessons on green and environmental chemistry in Organic Chemistry classes, contribute even greater strength and interdisciplinary breadth to the program.

Several major changes or improvements are needed at this time to build upon the recent successes and satisfy existing needs identified in the program assessment above.

1. Laboratory Curricula, Equipment and Facilities:
A. First, the comparison to A.S. programs at other institutions shows RVCC to have been lacking in the absence of a lab component in its introductory Environmental Science core course (ENVI-101). This was effectively amended in spring 2014, with course and program revisions made by Dr. Stander creating a lab version of the course (Environmental Science and Sustainability ENVI-102), which will be required in the future for all incoming Environmental Science A.S. and Environmental Studies A.A. students. This class will also provide general education credit to non-majors, as will the existing non-lab version of the course, the name of which has been simplified to Environmental Studies (ENVI-101).

B. Additional laboratory materials and equipment are needed to develop basic components of the Environmental Science curricula in the core courses (ENVI-102; ENVI-201) pertaining to traditional environmental science practices (water, air, soil testing) and sustainability studies (energy, water, consumer product analysis). The current capacity of the program is extremely limited in its ability to support curricular content and professional skill development in these important (and defining) sub-disciplines of environmental science. Analytical lab and field testing equipment should be purchased to support these concerns as soon as possible, the costs of which may be offset by external grant funding and/or cost-sharing with other STEM programs that could also make use of these devices. 12-seat passenger vans should also be considered for purchase in order to support student transportation to the many field sites visited during lab and extended field trips. Ideally, the vans should run on diesel fuel so students can make their own fuel from waste cafeteria oil and conduct formal assessments of fuel, carbon, and waste savings as part of their curriculum.

C. Scheduling flexibility has been limited by the absence of dedicated lab and classroom space for Environmental Science at RVCC. The incipient construction of an addition to the science building beginning in 2014 will greatly improve the facilities capabilities of the program. It is essential that the building renovations include space for the herbarium, greenhouse, computers, and storage for field and lab equipment, which are important existing assets to the program. Additional benefits to the program would be gained by use of the building itself as a learning object for sustainability studies and engineering. Incorporating devices or other capacity to measure water and energy use and structural elements in the new LEED certified science and other buildings would provide excellent opportunities to use the building itself as a real-world demonstration or lab to support student learning.

(The Science addition will be completed in 2016. Infrared cameras and an xray tomography machine were purchased in 2014. A Climate Change and Energy course has been developed, to be offered by an adjunct professor.)

+ Date Revised: May 19, 2015

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Curriculum plan(s):

Environmental Science faculty Dr. Jay Kelly and Dr. Emilie Stander; English faculty Dr. Angela Bodino.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Research (or other scholarship):
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The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Research plan(s):
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Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Research plan(s):
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A brief description of the plan(s) to advance Campus Engagement around sustainability:

From the EPA MOU:
Campus and Community Involvement
RVCC takes the environmental and sustainable message to its academic community and the regional community. Its proximity to the Raritan River and its place in a vibrant region with expanding development gives it unique insights and special responsibilities when it comes to the environment. RVCC will consider applying for River Friendly certification of the pond and stream that runs through the campus.

The RVCC campus has an active student body with over 20 student organizations. Students participate in Social Justice Club, REAL (Raritan Environmental Action League) and contribute to sustainability efforts through estuary clean-up projects, Habitat for Humanity and the Outdoor Clubs. Raritan Valley Community College students also actively promote and participate in the nationally recognized “Earth Day” events, tree planting and stream monitoring. There is also a college wide Sustainability Team that recommends green initiatives.

+ Date Revised: May 19, 2015

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Campus Engagement plan:

Measurable objectives are to have at least one event for Earth Week each year, for the Sustainability Committee to recommend/lead at least one environmental initiative each year, and to achieve and maintain River Friendly Certification (certified in 2012, recertifying in 2015).

+ Date Revised: May 19, 2015

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Campus Engagement plan(s):

Sustainability Committee, Sustainability coordinator


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance Public Engagement around sustainability:

In their annual reports, the Service Learning program ties their goals to elements of the college strategic plan. For example, in 2013-14 they link a project to "Strategic Driver # 1 Changing Demographics: Increase College responsiveness to changing demographics, to growing diversity, and to changing needs in our community."

From the EPA MOU:
The Somerset County Business Partnership sponsors a first of its kind in the state program called “Somerset County High Performance Buildings Program.” RVCC participates in many of their initiatives including our new West Building which is a featured on their program website.

+ Date Revised: May 19, 2015
+ Date Revised: May 19, 2015

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Public Engagement plan(s):

SERVICE LEARNING:
• Goal 1: Participate in a Planning Grant funded by the NY-based Teagle Foundation to develop a multi-state, three-year service learning grant initiative to expand students’ civic and moral responsibility and to assess student learning outcomes. Findings will be shared through national conference presentations and publications. The grant was funded and implemented beginning January 2014.

• Goal 2: Work to develop and advance the New Jersey Campus Compact with the new Executive Director of the New Jersey Campus Compact and Task Force members to strengthen networks of professionals and connect other campuses in the state to a myriad of statewide planning.

CAS Assessment outcomes linked to Strategic Driver # 1 Changing Demographics: Increase College responsiveness to changing demographics, to growing diversity, and to changing needs in our community. Success indicator: College offers an expanded range of professional development opportunities so that they become part of the institutional culture. Evidence includes:

- Participated in a three-day Planning Grant in Arizona (July 2013) with five other community colleges around the country. Co-authored proposal to Teagle Foundation. Helped to develop an assessment tool to measure student learning outcomes. Served as the coordinator for the Teagle project. Recruited six faculty members to serve as project faculty leads. Coordinated Teagle assessment plan among faculty and students. Participated in Teagle training workshop in Arizona (May 2014).
- Secured funding through the RVCC Community College Fund to support travel and participation for three faculty members to participate in the May 2014 Teagle training in Arizona.
- Helped to transition new NJCC Executive Director with administrative and financial reports and provided direction. Successfully helped the NJCC receive tax exempt status with the proper filings and follow-up.
- Served on the New Jersey Campus Compact Task Force with representatives from 15 colleges to help develop and implement activities and work goals.

• Goal 2: Provided students, faculty and community partners with on-going orientations and training to ensure that the goals of the program and students’ service projects are clearly defined and each partner’s roles and responsibilities are clarified. Conducted regular evaluations to assess both community impact and student development.

CAS Assessment outcomes linked to Strategic Driver # 3: Ensure program and services are built around a Student Centered Philosophy. Success indicator: Student services have been administratively evaluated and designed where necessary to ensure that they are cohesive with clearly defined student development outcomes. Evidence includes:

- Developed community partnerships to design new projects in engineering, history, computer science, nursing, and education courses. Maintained records, reports, and documentation of Service Learning and constituent impacts that were used for national award programs, conference presentations and grant applications.
- Promoted and publicized service learning to constituents and provided a clearinghouse on information about service learning opportunities for the campus and community both locally and nationally.
- Expanded outreach to First-Year Experience classes.
- Created new service learning partnerships with the following RVCC Clubs: Environmental, Enactus, Rotaract.

• Goal 3: Fostered a Service Learning Program that engages all constituents and encourages campus institutionalization of civic participation. Helped to advance the practice of service learning locally, regionally and nationally; identified and incorporated standards of best practices into the program.

CAS Assessment outcomes linked to Strategic Driver # 3: Ensure program and services are built around a Student Centered Philosophy and Strategic and Driver # 2: Provide the highest quality educational experience for students, regardless of their educational preparation.
Success indicator: Outcomes were regularly tracked and evaluated for the purposes of program improvement. Assessment protocols demonstrated achievement of outcomes and provided information for program improvement. A coordinated set of recognition programs have been established. Projects have created pathways between credit and non-credit programming. Evidence includes:

- Wrote and submitted applications for the 2014 President’s Community Service Honor Roll and 2015 Carnegie Reclassification and.
- Accepted invitation to serve on the Advisory Panel for the Carnegie Classification.
- Provided awards and recognitions to students, faculty and community partners.
- Provided Student Engagement Transcripts.
- Increased involvement among faculty, i.e., designed and completed new service learning projects that involved all students in Engineering, Graphic Design, and Computer Science.
- Enhanced service opportunities for students by combining curricular and co-curricular activities with the following clubs: Environmental and Enactus.
- Worked with Task Force members from 15 colleges to design and implement activities, projects and strategic plans for New Jersey State Compact.
- Participated in a three-day Planning Grant in Arizona (July 2014) and co-authored a proposal to the Teagle Foundation which was awarded and will support a three-year, multi-state service learning project with six other community colleges.

SOMERSET COUNTY BUSINESS PARTNERSHIP: Objective is ongoing participation in and support of SCBP activities, particularly the Sustainable Somerset committee. Sustainable Somerset's objectives for 2015 are to hold educational and networking meetings on at least a monthly basis.

+ Date Revised: May 19, 2015
+ Date Revised: May 19, 2015

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Public Engagement plan(s):

Sue Dorward, Sustainability Coordinator, Facilities Department

+ Date Revised: May 19, 2015

A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Air and Climate:

This is incorporated in the Memorandum of Understanding with the EPA, signed in 2009.

Under this MOU, Raritan Valley Community College will participate in the following voluntary EPA environmental stewardship programs:

• ENERGY STAR Building & Plant Partnership
• National Clean Diesel Campaign & Clean Construction USA


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Air and Climate plan(s):

RVCC will consider joining the EPA partnership program for combined heat and power.
ENERGY STAR Building & Plant Partnership.

Under this MOU, RVCC will become an EPA ENERGY STAR Partner. RVCC will utilize EPA’s program offering within ENERGY STAR Building & Plants entitled “Menu of ENERGY STAR Offerings for Higher Education” (the Menu) as the structure for continuous improvement and to meet or exceed the goal of 10% energy reduction under the program.

Utilizing Portfolio Manager, EPA’s interactive energy management tool, RVCC will track and assess the energy and water consumption of all major buildings on campus. RVCC will also determine the energy performance rating of all major buildings on campus. Based on the rating results, RVCC will establish energy use reduction goals.

National Clean Diesel Campaign & Clean Construction USA
Under this MOU, RVCC will join EPA’s Clean Construction USA Program to cooperatively promote and implement measures to effectively reduce emissions from vehicles and other internal combustion engines used in construction and operation of its facilities, with a focus on diesel engine emission reductions.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Air and Climate plan(s):

Facilities Department


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Buildings:

Re-Use of Industrial Materials
Re-use, and re-buy are also a part of RVCC’s planning process for new construction and renovation projects. When possible RVCC will specify the use of construction materials with recycled material content, materials manufactured locally within a 500 mile radius, and materials with low volatile organic compounds (VOC) off-gassing. In addition, RVCC will engage construction and demolition debris haulers/recyclers to recycle waste that is generated from new construction and renovation projects. Raritan Valley Community College will report on the amount of material re-used or recycled under this MOU for projects initiated after 2011.

For any future construction projects, RVCC will incorporate the use of coal combustion products (CCP) in place of portland cement for concrete, where feasible. The amount of CCP will be reported under this MOU.

Under this MOU, RVCC will work to incorporate many of EPA’s tools and targeted initiatives within WasteWise, including the Waste Reduction Model (WARM) to estimate greenhouse gas reductions from its recycling practices; Electronics Challenge to recycle and avoid hazardous materials from entering landfills; Building Challenge to recycle, reuse and reduce construction and demolition materials; and Comprehensive Procurement Guidelines to specify and purchase standard materials containing recycled content. Achievements in this area will be reported under this MOU.

Sustainable Design, Construction and Operations Practices
RVCC is committed to incorporating the principles of the United States Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) green building rating system in new and renovated buildings.

RVCC will build all future buildings to LEED Silver certification. The Director of Facilities for RVCC recently obtained certification as a LEED Accredited Professional. RVCC recently completed the baseline carbon calculation for the campus.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Buildings plan(s):

When possible RVCC will specify the use of construction materials with recycled material content, materials manufactured locally within a 500 mile radius.

RVCC will engage construction and demolition debris haulers/recyclers to recycle waste that is generated from new construction and renovation projects.

RVCC will build all future buildings to LEED Silver certification.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Buildings plan(s):

Facilities Department, Finance


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Dining Services/Food:
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The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Dining Services/Food plan(s):
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Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Dining Services/Food plan(s):
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A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Energy:

Clean Energy
In 2007, RVCC installed a 1.4MW cogeneration engine becoming the first community college in the country to do so. Combined Heat and Power (CHP), also known as cogeneration, is the concurrent production of electricity or mechanical power and useful thermal energy (heating and/or cooling) from a single source of energy. CHP is not a single technology but a suite of technologies that generate electricity or power at the point of use, allowing the heat that would normally be lost in power generation, transmission, and distribution processes to be recovered for heating and/or cooling. This allows for much greater improvement in overall fuel efficiency, resulting in lower operating costs and CO2 emissions. The goal of the plant is to reduce carbon emissions by 1900 tons per year. The College received a grant for $1 million from the NJ Board of Public Utilities to construct the cogeneration plant. RVCC will consider joining the EPA partnership program for combined heat and power.

ENERGY STAR Building & Plant Partnership
Under this MOU, RVCC will become an EPA ENERGY STAR Partner. RVCC will utilize EPA’s program offering within ENERGY STAR Building & Plants entitled “Menu of ENERGY STAR Offerings for Higher Education” (the Menu) as the structure for continuous improvement and to meet or exceed the goal of 10% energy reduction under the program.

Utilizing Portfolio Manager, EPA’s interactive energy management tool, RVCC will track and assess the energy and water consumption of all major buildings on campus. RVCC will also determine the energy performance rating of all major buildings on campus. Based on the rating results, RVCC will establish energy use reduction goals.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Energy plan(s):

The goal of the plant is to reduce carbon emissions by 1900 tons per year.

10% energy reduction


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Energy plan(s):

Facilities Department, Finance


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Grounds:

Under this MOU, RVCC will consult with the EPA GreenScapes Program. RVCC will utilize EPA’s GreenScapes program to reduce the need to replace landscaping materials and high maintenance plants, work towards reusing landscape materials where possible, recycle organic materials and make decisions to specify and purchase products that are environmentally preferable. RVCC will to utilize EPA’s GreenScapes Tip Sheets and Re-buy Checklist to develop its own written GreenScapes program by the end of 2010. RVCC’s GreenScapes Program document will be used for continuous improvement and RVCC will keep records of waste, energy, and climate change activities related to its grounds keeping efforts. RVCC has already planned to landscape the new science building stairs with sustainable vegetation. The college will eliminate the use of herbicides and use only organic fertilizers starting on July 1, 2009.

Under the River Friendly program, RVCC agreed to only plant native plants, maintain no-mow areas along streams, and not use herbicides except for invasive species.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Grounds plan(s):

RVCC will to utilize EPA’s GreenScapes Tip Sheets and Re-buy Checklist to develop its own written GreenScapes program by the end of 2010.

The college will eliminate the use of herbicides and use only organic fertilizers starting on July 1, 2009.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Grounds plan(s):

Facilities Department


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Purchasing:

From MOU: The College is currently evaluating its options for purchasing green power under the EPA GreenPower partnership.

Re-Use of Industrial Materials
Re-use, and re-buy are also a part of RVCC’s planning process for new construction and renovation projects.

Under this MOU, RVCC will utilize WaterSense Products, where appropriate.

Green cleaning products are used in several campus facilities. Green cleaning products include glass cleaner, all-purpose cleaner, and floor cleaner. The College intends to consult the EPA’s Environmentally Preferable Products list and expand its green cleaning program to cover additional facilities and to include additional cleaning products.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Purchasing plan(s):

Become an EPA Green Power Partner. Purchase green power (percentage is measurable) as budget permits.

On an ongoing basis, re-use and re-buy for new construction and renovation projects. Materials cost and percentage recycled are measurable.

On an ongoing basis, purchase water-conserving products.

Continue using green cleaning products. Expand use of green cleaning products as affordable EPA-approved products become available.

+ Date Revised: May 19, 2015

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Purchasing plan(s):

Purchasing Department, Facilities


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Transportation:

Transportation and Commuter Programs
Raritan Valley Community College will create a transportation plan that promotes clean transportation alternatives through the use of fuel-saving strategies, commuter benefit programs, and other innovative measures. Programs may include, but not be limited to the following:

Clean Vehicle Fleets
Clean vehicle programs reduce fuel consumption and improve air quality by taking advantage of the latest technologies available to improve fuel economy and reduce emissions from on-road vehicles. Clean vehicle fleet measures include purchase of cleaner (hybrid or alternatively fueled) light-duty vehicles, and use of ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel and best available retrofit technologies on diesel fuel-powered on-road vehicles. Raritan Valley Community College will use clean vehicles in its own fleets, and promote the use of clean vehicle fleets by its contractors, faculty, staff and students. (Additional info on projected future number of vehicles may be included, if known)

Benefits for “Clean” Commuters
Raritan Valley Community College will encourage its faculty, staff and students by providing discounted parking passes and preferred parking for those with hybrid or alternatively fueled vehicles. Raritan Valley Community College will also promote emission reductions efforts such as car pooling and public transportation.

The Sustainability Committee developed a Transportation Strategic Plan in January 2014.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Transportation plan(s):

Goal of 10% alternative power vehicles in fleet. (The college had a hybrid which satisfied this, but it was sold when President Casey left.)

From Transportation Strategic plan, goals for 2017:
3. Bicycles
Current state: RVCC has two bike racks (by Arts building and Theater) and no bike lanes. It does not appear feasible to add bike lanes. In the 2010 survey, 5 full-time students (0.8%) and 1 full-time employee (1.4%) reported that they walk or bike to campus.
Goals:
a) Double the number of bike riders on campus, to 2% of full-time students and 3% of full-time employees.
Suggested tactics:
a) Add a bike rack at the student center. This is already planned.
b) Provide bike maintenance tools at the student center and/or welcome center. (This is a suggestion from the NJ Smart Workplaces program.)
c) Post “share the road” signs (with a bicycle graphic) at each entrance.
d) Investigate creating a bike/pedestrian trail (Department of Transportation grant?)
e) Investigate getting maps of local bike trails, possibly from local bike clubs.
f) Consider sponsoring a bike ride or “ride your bike to campus” day, possibly during Earth Week.

4. Buses
Current State: Two Somerset County buses, the CAT-1R and the CAT-2R, come to campus every two hours on weekdays. Tickets are $2 per ride. The CAT-1R serves Franklin, Bound Brook, South Bound Brook, Somerville, and Bridgewater. The CAT-2R serves Raritan, Somerville, Bridgewater, and the Hills in Bedminster. Both buses stop at the Somerville train station but are not timed well with the train schedule. The CAT-1R stops at Bridgewater Commons Mall, a transfer point for NJ Transit buses. In the 2010 survey, 1.7% of full-time students and 1.4% of full-time employees indicated that they took the bus.
Goals:
a) Double the number of bus riders on campus to 3% of full-time students and 3% of full-time employees.
Suggested tactics:
a) Continue to display RideWise posters advertising the buses.
b) Continue to provide bus information at the Welcome Center, at student orientation sessions, and at welcome stations.
c) Advocate for CAT bus schedules that make transferring from the train and NJ Transit buses more convenient.
d) Contact HART, Hunterdon County’s transportation management association, to investigate the possibility of a bus for Hunterdon students.
e) RVCC recently signed up for NJ Transit’s University Partnership to get 25% student discounts. See www.raritanval.edu/njtransit. Advertise the discounts to students.
f) Contact NJ Transit about common complaints: “1) The bus to RVCC-Bridgewater only goes as far as the mall at night. Students have to walk in the dark a long way to get the bus. During the day it goes as far as the post office which works fine. 2) The bus from Flemington stops at Kings Plaza. (I think that is the name) It is a $40 cab ride from there to campus.” – Diane Lemko, Dean of Student Affairs
g) Form a relationship with HART, the Hunterdon TMA, to stay abreast of and potentially influence their transportation options.
5. Carpools
Current State: In the 2010 survey, 10% of RVCC's full-time students and 2.5% of employees reported that they carpool to campus at least half of the time. 45% of full-time students are willing to carpool. RideWise has a Ticket Home program for registered commuters who rideshare or take mass transit and need a ride due to a medical emergency, overtime work, carpool breakdown, or transit service interruption. Both students and employees are eligible.
Goals:
a) Increase the number of carpool riders by 50% (to 15% of full-time students).
Suggested tactics:
a) Transition from AlterNetRides Rideshare online carpooling program to RideWise’s rideshare program, so that RVCC can better take advantage of RideWise’s support and marketing to encourage carpooling. RideWise can set up their system so that carpool matches would be restricted only to RVCC students and employees.
b) Advertise RideWise’s Ticket Home program for registered carpools.
c) Create premium parking spaces (possibly in front of the West building) that are reserved for registered carpools and vanpools. RideWise may be able to help with the registration and provide registration stickers.
d) With Rideshare, and First Year Experience, and Student Affairs support, hold a carpool and vanpool formation event at the beginning of each semester.
e) Make literature about the rideshare program available at the Welcome Desk and the cafeteria entrance. (RideWise may be able to provide this.)
f) Invite RideWise to host a table at the fall picnic.
g) Investigate the use of Twitter to facilitate carpooling. (Ask RideWise.)
6. Clean Vehicles
By “clean” we mean cleaner than conventional gas vehicles. This includes hybrid, electric, high efficiency, and propane-powered vehicles. (According to the Dept. of Energy, propane use reduces greenhouse gas emissions by about 10%.)
Current state: RVCC has one hybrid vehicle and no electric vehicles in its fleet. There are two electric car charging stations on campus. There is no other preferred parking or other benefits for clean vehicles. The construction vehicles for the student center use ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) and the onroad vehicles have diesel particulate filters (DPFs).
Goals:
a) For future vehicle purchases, the college will prefer clean vehicles.
b) RVCC will require that construction contractors’ onroad vehicles use ULSD and have DPFs.
c) RVCC will encourage contractors to use ULSD or biodiesel and have DPFs on all diesel vehicles.
d) RVCC will promote the use of clean vehicles by its faculty, staff, and students, with the goal of doubling the number of these vehicles on campus by 2016.
Suggested tactics:
a) For future golf cart purchases, purchase electric carts.
b) Consider converting to propane-powered lawnmowers. (The college already plans to convert one mower.)
c) Consider propane-powered when purchasing new trucks.
d) Include language regarding ULSD, DPFs, and clean vehicle preferences in all applicable contracts.
e) Reach out to area car dealerships to encourage student pricing deals on hybrid and electric vehicles. Suggested dealerships are Flemington Car and Truck Country (owner Steve Kalafer was a graduation speaker; includes Nissan and Chevrolet dealerships), Fullerton Ford (they have a history of being involved in the community), and Bridgewater Nissan (new).
f) Provide opportunities for these car dealerships to market hybrid and electric cars to students and employees, perhaps at the spring picnic and/or Earth Week.

10. Train
Current state: The train runs infrequently to North Branch station, and there is no public transportation from there to campus. It is more practical to take the train to the Somerville station and then take the Cat-2R or Cat-1R bus to campus. However, there is often a significant time delay between the train and the bus. In the 2010 survey, 1.4% of full-time students and 0% of full-time employees indicated that they took the train.
Goals:
a) Increase train ridership to 3% for full-time students and 1% for full-time employees.
Suggested tactics:
a) RVCC recently signed up for NJ Transit’s University Partnership to get 25% student discounts. See http://www.raritanval.edu/njtransit. Advertise these discounts to students.
b) With support from RideWise, contact car services to see if it is economically feasible to provide rides between the Somerville train station and campus. These would be better synchronized with the train schedule and make taking the train more convenient. Advertise the availability of these car services to students.
c) Contact the student club Enactus (formerly SIFE) about the entrepreneurship opportunity for providing rides to and from the train station.
d) When providing information about the CAT buses, make sure to highlight the train station stops.
e) Advocate for CAT bus schedules that make transferring from the train and NJ Transit buses more convenient.
f) Contact HART, Hunterdon County’s transportation management association, to investigate the possibility of a bus from Whitehouse Station train station for Hunterdon students.
11. Vanpools
Current state: There are no known vanpools to campus. RideWise supports the formation of vanpools and works with a provider called vRide. Vanpools are feasible for commutes of 15 miles or more. For insurance reasons, vanpool drivers must be 25 or older. Vanpools should have at least two drivers. NJ Transit offers $175 vanpool subsidy per month. RideWise has a Ticket Home program for commuters who carpool, vanpool, or take mass transit and need a ride due to a medical emergency, overtime work, carpool breakdown, or transit service interruption. According to Susan Harkins from RideWise, the monthly cost per person of a vanpool to Flemington costs between $81 (for 15 people) and $204 (for 5 people).
Goals:
a) Establish at least one vanpool on campus.
Suggested tactics:
a) Have RideWise do a zip code analysis to identify areas that are good candidates for vanpooling.
b) Contact the student club Enactus (formerly SIFE) about the entrepreneurship opportunity for vanpools.
c) Host a carpool and vanpool formation event and have RideWise present information about vRide. For vanpools, focus on creating a vanpool in one target area.
d) Provide premium parking spaces (perhaps in front of the West Building) for RideWise-registered carpools and vanpools.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Transportation plan(s):

Facilities, Sustainability Committee


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Waste:

WasteWise Partnership and Solid Waste Recycling
Under this MOU, RVCC will become an EPA WasteWise Partner. The College encourages and enforces recycling programs. Materials recycled include glass, aluminum and bi-metal containers, paper, and cardboard. In addition, an electronic devices recycling program is in place. The College will consider participating in the annual RecycleMania event sponsored by EPA.

High efficiency hand dryers have been installed in several locations on campus. In addition to promoting better hygiene, the hand dryers allow the College to decrease its waste stream of paper towels. Installation of these devices in other locations is being evaluated.

Under the MOU, RVCC will work with its vendors to consider the use of EPA’s Food Waste Calculator. Effective July 1, 2009, the College will send all bio-degradable kitchen waste to an off-site composting facility. The College will also consider using 100% bio-degradable disposable serviceware and containers.

The College recently purchased 75 additional recycling containers that have been deployed throughout the campus.

Re-Use of Industrial Materials
Re-use, and re-buy are also a part of RVCC’s planning process for new construction and renovation projects. When possible RVCC will specify the use of construction materials with recycled material content, materials manufactured locally within a 500 mile radius, and materials with low volatile organic compounds (VOC) off-gassing. In addition, RVCC will engage construction and demolition debris haulers/recyclers to recycle waste that is generated from new construction and renovation projects. Raritan Valley Community College will report on the amount of material re-used or recycled under this MOU for projects initiated after 2011.

For any future construction projects, RVCC will incorporate the use of coal combustion products (CCP) in place of portland cement for concrete, where feasible. The amount of CCP will be reported under this MOU.

Under this MOU, RVCC will work to incorporate many of EPA’s tools and targeted initiatives within WasteWise, including the Waste Reduction Model (WARM) to estimate greenhouse gas reductions from its recycling practices; Electronics Challenge to recycle and avoid hazardous materials from entering landfills; Building Challenge to recycle, reuse and reduce construction and demolition materials; and Comprehensive Procurement Guidelines to specify and purchase standard materials containing recycled content. Achievements in this area will be reported under this MOU.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Waste plan(s):

The College will consider participating in the annual RecycleMania event sponsored by EPA.
- participating for the first time in 2015

Installing only air hand dryers

consider using 100% bio-degradable disposable serviceware and containers

When possible RVCC will specify the use of construction materials with recycled material content

RVCC engages construction and demolition debris haulers/recyclers to recycle waste that is generated from new construction and renovation projects

use of coal combustion products (CCP) in place of portland cement for concrete, where feasible


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Waste plan(s):

Facilities


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Water:

WaterSense Products
Both RVCC and EPA recognize the importance of using water efficiently. Water-efficient behaviors and the use of quality products that minimize water use can result in less water drawn from New Jersey resources; reduced energy use and CO2 emissions related to water treatment and pumping; and reduced water utility costs.

RVCC has already eliminated water cooled condensers in the Kitchen and replaced them with more efficient air cooled condensers that do not waste water. RVCC also renovated bathrooms and replaced urinals with waterless fixtures and metering faucets. In 2006, RVCC replaced all of the underground heating and cooling piping that was leaking, saving on several thousand gallons of make up water.

Under this MOU, RVCC will utilize WaterSense Products, where appropriate. RVCC also commits to following the WaterSense Guidelines in order to encourage students, faculty, staff and administrators to conserve water; provide EPA with annual water consumption data; and feature WaterSense products on RVCC’s sustainability web page.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Water plan(s):

Fix leaks on an ongoing basis

Buy low water usage fixtures, metered/sensor-driven faucets, and waterless urinals

Capture rainwater for for watering plants and in toilets


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Water plan(s):

Facilities


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance Diversity and Affordability:

Strategic plan guiding principle: Diversity
The strength of the college’s future and the ability of the
college to grow its diversity, in all respects, are intimately
intertwined. We continue to recognize and value the
importance of diversity in our institution at all levels: in the
administration, in the faculty, and in the student body. The
board, the administration, the faculty, and the staff will
continue to emphasize, monitor, and evaluate our on-going
efforts supporting this important goal.

Strategic Driver
RVCC’s programs and services meet the needs of
our communities by anticipating and responding
to changing demographics, growing diversity, and
emerging economic and cultural challenges.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Diversity and Affordability plan(s):

RVCC Success Indicators by FY 2017
College grows market share of high school graduates in the
two county area
metric
Market share increases to 21%
Participation in concurrent enrollment and academy programs in
high schools increases to 1,000 students annually by the 2013-14
academic year
Active school district partnerships increase to 18
College develops enhanced programming to meet the
needs of the 25-34 age group
metric
Number of adult students (25 - 34) increases to 1,500
by Fall 2016
Adult full-time students complete degrees and certifi cates at the
same rate as younger students
University Center program increases to serve the advanced
educational needs of our community
Workforce programs fully incorporate a stackable credential
model and lead to meaningful completion milestones for job
enhancement
College impacts public transportation planning
metric
College is represented in appropriate organizations/
meetings for planning public transportation
Bridgewater site, which is more accessible to public transportation,
off ers a full and effi cient course schedule
College responds to increasing ethnic diversity in its
communities
metric
Enrollment overall refl ects the diverse community
populations
The achievement gap in completion rates for all demographic
groups has been minimized


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Diversity and Affordability plan(s):

Board of Directors, Administration, Office of Multicultural Affairs


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Health, Wellbeing and Work:
---

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Health, Wellbeing and Work plan(s):
---

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Health, Wellbeing and Work plan(s):
---

A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Investment:
---

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Investment plan(s):
---

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Investment plan(s):
---

A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in other areas:
---

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the other plan(s):
---

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the other plan(s):
---

The institution’s definition of sustainability:
---

Does the institution’s strategic plan or equivalent guiding document include sustainability at a high level?:
Yes

A brief description of how the institution’s strategic plan or equivalent guiding document addresses sustainability:

The Strategic Plan for 2013-17 is available at
http://www.raritanval.edu/uploadedFiles/about/publications/strat-plan_13-17.pdf

In Guiding Principles:
Diversity
The strength of the college’s future and the ability of the
college to grow its diversity, in all respects, are intimately
intertwined. We continue to recognize and value the
importance of diversity in our institution at all levels: in the
administration, in the faculty, and in the student body. The
board, the administration, the faculty, and the staff will
continue to emphasize, monitor, and evaluate our on-going
efforts supporting this important goal.

Strategic driver 2 metric 2:
College has mechanisms to assist students in overcoming
financial barriers to higher education
metric
All students who receive Pell grant fi nancial aid have
an academic plan in place that leads to completion within 6
semesters and understand how to use their Pell grant support to
complete a baccalaureate degree
All students receiving veterans benefi ts have an academic plan
in place and are advised how to achieve their goals within the 18
months of VA eligibility
College has active relationships with support agencies in both
counties to assist students in dealing with housing, food, child
care, transportation, or other economic barriers to higher
education
Foundation scholarship and program support increases to
$350,000 by 2017
On-campus employment opportunities increase to 150

Strategic Driver 4:
RVCC’s programs and services meet the needs of
our communities by anticipating and responding
to changing demographics, growing diversity, and
emerging economic and cultural challenges.
Metrics:
College develops enhanced programming to meet the
needs of the 25-34 age group
metric
Number of adult students (25 - 34) increases to 1,500
by Fall 2016
Adult full-time students complete degrees and certificates at the
same rate as younger students
University Center program increases to serve the advanced
educational needs of our community
Workforce programs fully incorporate a stackable credential
model and lead to meaningful completion milestones for job
enhancement
College impacts public transportation planning
metric
College is represented in appropriate organizations/
meetings for planning public transportation
Bridgewater site, which is more accessible to public transportation,
offers a full and efficient course schedule
College responds to increasing ethnic diversity in its
communities
metric
Enrollment overall reflects the diverse community
populations
The achievement gap in completion rates for all demographic
groups has been minimized


The website URL where information about the institution’s sustainability planning is available:

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.