Overall Rating Gold - expired
Overall Score 65.52
Liaison Gina Talt
Submission Date Feb. 28, 2018
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

Princeton University
OP-11: Sustainable Procurement

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.50 / 3.00 Joseph Woodward
Senior Associate Director
Procurement Services, Office of the VP for Finance and Treasurer
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Does the institution have written policies, guidelines or directives that seek to support sustainable purchasing across commodity categories institution-wide?:
Yes

A copy of the policies, guidelines or directives:
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The policies, guidelines or directives:

The University includes language in procurement policies which support and require sustainable purchasing. For example, 100% recycled paper is our standard, remanufactured toner cartridges is our standard, deliveries are made via recyclable containers when practical.
In addition, Procurement Services addresses diversity and sustainability as part of our sourcing events. The following language is taken directly from the Bid Criteria document which is required to be viewed when a supplier desires to participate in a sourcing event through our electronic sourcing portal:
“Princeton University is committed to measuring, assessing and minimizing the environmental impact of the goods and services provided by its supply base. The University seeks to partner with suppliers who demonstrate these actions whenever possible.”
And,
“Princeton University is committed to making supplier diversity an integral part of the way it does business, consistent with its commitment to a diverse and inclusive university community that advances its teaching and research mission. Our commitment is driven by the belief that engaging a diverse supply base is mutually beneficial; fostering competition, opportunity, and generating considerable value by broadening the pool of supplier expertise, perspectives, and capabilities. The University’s procurement practices aim to provide competitive access to sourcing opportunities and to promote diverse supplier participation. Princeton also seeks suppliers that share our commitment by embracing diversity within their own organizations and supply base in the delivery of goods and services to the University. Minority owned, woman owned, and veteran owned businesses are encouraged to include their certification information as part of their response for full consideration.”
Finally, the University actively participates in local, regional and national diversity events as part of our supplier diversity strategy. These include:
May 2016: Sponsored and exhibited at the Capital Region Minority Chamber of Commerce Annual Summit
July 2016: Participated in the National Association of Educational Procurement Supplier Diversity Conference
April 2017: Participated in the ISM-Philadelphia 2017 Annual Vendor Diversity Fair
May 2017: Participated in the ISM-NJ Diversity Night event
May 2017: Participated as a featured panelist at a Philadelphia Hispanic Chamber of Commerce event
July 2017: Exhibited at the Mid-Jersey Chamber of Commerce Luncheon
August 2017: Attended the Statewide Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Commerce Annual Diversity Expo


Does the institution employ Life Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA) when evaluating energy- and water-using products and systems?:
Yes

Which of the following best describes the institution’s use of LCCA?:
Institution employs LCCA less comprehensively, e.g. for certain types of systems or projects and not others

A brief description of the LCCA policy and/or practices:

The Facilities Design Standards Manual prescribes LCCA requirements for sizable capital project purchases, including but not limited to envelope, energy systems, water systems, structural systems, electrical systems, interior finishes. See the Facilities Design Standards Manual, Sustainability chapter for requirements: https://facilities.princeton.edu/sites/facilities/files/DSM.pdf.

In addition to the project requirements listed above, the Facilities Engineering Department utilizes LCCA as part of the budgeting process for every major energy plant equipment purchase. There are no specific published requirements for this internal exercise, but it closely aligns with the methods outlined in the Facilities Design Standards Manual for construction and renovation projects.


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating chemically intensive products and services (e.g. building and facilities maintenance, cleaning and sanitizing, landscaping and grounds maintenance)?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for chemically intensive products and services:

1. Landscape and Grounds Maintenance: Princeton University has recently established a written policy that will continue to evolve and that outlines the guidelines of its Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program. The policy states that IPM at Princeton University "is a long-term approach to maintaining healthy landscapes that minimize risks to people and the environment. Princeton University will employ the use of: site assessment, monitoring, and pest prevention in combination with a variety of pest management tactics to keep pests within acceptable limits. Instead of routine chemical applications Princeton University will employ mechanical, physical, and biological controls with selective use of low impact and non-low impact pesticides when deemed necessary."

2. Building and Facilities Maintenance: At this time, Princeton University's Building Services does not have a written policy regarding the use of chemically intensive cleaning and sanitizing products/services, but adheres to the below stated preference statement:

"The Building Services department will utilize Green Seal-certified products and/or Electrically Activated Water for all daily use cleaning products. Further, the department will expand processes for refinishing floors without the use of conventional floor stripper. All restroom hand soap throughout the University is Green Seal-certified. At this time, the University’s primary disinfectants are not Green Seal certified."


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating construction and renovation products (e.g. furnishings and building materials)?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for construction and renovation products:

The Facilities Design Standards Manual lists a series of criteria for buildings, both new construction and renovation projects. Buildings materials are evaluated on a project by project basis as part of goal setting exercises. The materials are looked at in context of the larger system of the building. Everything from VOC contents, recycled content, regional materials, impacts on energy systems, occupant comfort, durability, maintenance, aesthetics, among others are evaluated. In addition to specific project goal setting, projects will evaluate and select the appropriate 3rd party certification system for the job. The project will select to either benchmark or seek formal certification. See Design Standards Manual for the published policy: https://facilities.princeton.edu/sites/facilities/files/DSM.pdf


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating Information technology (IT) products and services (e.g. computers, imaging equipment, mobile phones, data centers and cloud services)?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for IT products and services:

See the attached document for the published guideline regarding Electronics Sustainability (Group 3).

For electronics specifically, we seek out those that are EPEAT™ registered. It is part of our selection criteria when defining “standards” for any electronic item we are going to use on the campus, and a standard our students demand and expect as well.
In addition, when selecting supplier partners, our evaluation criteria includes sustainability considerations to include EPEAT certification, the use of remanufactured/recycled content, and end of life considerations.


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating food services (i.e. franchises, vending services, concessions, convenience stores)?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for food services:
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Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating garments and linens?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for garments and linens:
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Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating professional services (e.g. architectural, engineering, public relations, financial)?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for professional services:

In support of the design, construction and operations side of the University, there is RFP language in conjunction with the University Design Standards manual that sets the tone for professional services procurement. A series of questions as well as an interview process that stems from these documents aid in evaluating how a professional fulfills the sustainability needs of the project. Princeton University employs a robust due diligence process to ensure that prospective team members foster a sense of collaboration in a transdisciplinary environment. The University has internally facing templates for verifying compliance, but it cannot be stressed enough that these documents are modified on a project by project basis to align the sustainability criteria of a given job with selection requirements. These internal documents are not available for public review.


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating transportation and fuels (e.g. travel, vehicles, delivery services, long haul transport, generator fuels, steam plants)?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for transportation and fuels:
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Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating wood and paper products?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for wood and paper products:

See the attached document for the published guideline around Paper Goods Sustainability.

Additionally, the University’s standard office paper is 100% recycled, Boise Cascade – Aspen 100. This is available in the three most used paper sizes and is presented at the top of the search results in the office supplies catalog provided by the University’s office supplier WB Mason. It should also be noted that the recycling symbol and green leaf icon are displayed on this product and are also searchable in the catalog. The Princeton shield icon indicates a preferred product.


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating products and services in other commodity categories that the institution has determined to have significant sustainability impacts?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for other commodity categories:

Procurement Services encourages suppliers to include their sustainability programs as part of their proposals when we solicit for new business. Sustainability and Diversity are components of our evaluation process, as well as Appliance Sustainability (See Groups 1 and 4 in the attached document).

Specific examples of sustainability in sourcing include:
1. Remanufactured toner cartridges for desktop and network printers continue to be part of our preferred usage. If an OEM cartridge happens to be ordered, the system is programmed to offer the remanufactured version instead.
2. Part of the evaluation criteria for the recently replaced multifunction devices deployed across campus included the ability to recycle toner cartridges in addition to significantly lower power requirements in both standby and in-use mode.
3. The University’s current food waste disposal event includes criteria for the downstream use of the waste. Currently, our food waste is sent to a local facility which processes the food waste into compost or used as animal feed.
4. Grounds to Grow On: K-Cup Pod Recovery Program is offered for free to all departments that have a WB Mason free rental machine/own a Keurig machine and purchase all K-cup products from WB Mason. The grounds are sent out for composting to be used in a variety of agricultural applications, while the remaining K−Cup® pod grinds are provided to Covanta Energy and are used in an energy-from-waste process.


The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:

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