Overall Rating Silver
Overall Score 62.98
Liaison Briar Schoon
Submission Date March 5, 2021

STARS v2.2

Portland Community College
OP-10: Biodiversity

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.00 / 2.00 Stephania Fregosi
Sustainability Analyst
Facilities Management Services
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution own or manage land that includes or is adjacent to legally protected areas, internationally recognized areas, priority sites for biodiversity, or regions of conservation importance?:
Yes

A brief description of the legally protected areas, internationally recognized areas, priority sites for biodiversity, and/or regions of conservation importance:

All Environmental Studies and Resources (ESR) courses utilize the the 110 acre Rock Creek Environmental Studies Center (RCESC) as part of lab classes. The RCESC is comprised of a 17 acre upland forest dominated by Douglas fir, a 30 acre upland forest of Douglas fir and mixed deciduous trees, two bottomland forests, a large emergent wetland, many scattered acres of wet meadows and grasslands as well as access to two streams, and a pond system. Though the RCESC is owned and managed by PCC-Rock Creek, the area is utilized by educational institutions throughout the Portland Metropolitan area.


Has the institution conducted an assessment to identify endangered and vulnerable species (including migratory species) with habitats on land owned or managed by the institution?:
Yes

A list of endangered and vulnerable species with habitats on land owned or managed by the institution, by level of extinction risk:

There are no known threatened/endangered species on the site.


Has the institution conducted an assessment to identify areas of biodiversity importance on land owned or managed by the institution?:
Yes

A brief description of areas of biodiversity importance on land owned or managed by the institution:

The RCESC is comprised of a 17-acre upland forest dominated by Douglas fir, a 30-acre upland forest of Douglas fir and mixed deciduous trees, two bottomland forests, a large emergent wetland, many scattered acres of wet meadows and grasslands as well as access to two streams, and a pond system.


The methodologies used to identify endangered and vulnerable species and/or areas of biodiversity importance and any ongoing assessment and monitoring mechanisms:

Sites have been identified by Environmental Studies classes and local habitat restoration organizations, and funded through grants from the USFWS, Tualatin Valley Foundation and others. This program is keyed to restoring wetland, riparian and forest systems. Classes in Environmental Studies and Resources (ESR) and biology are involved with planning, restoration, and monitoring.


A brief description of the scope of the assessment(s):

A TSWCD forest conservationist met with a PCC environmental educator for an initial site visit in March 2019 to begin crafting a forest stewardship plan for the Rock Creek Campus. The forest on the property is broken up into two separate areas, one 10-acre forest on the northwest side of the campus (i.e. western forest) and one 16-acre forest on the northeast side of the campus (i.e. eastern forest). They evaluated the landowner's objectives for the management of the land, land topography, soils and geology, water resources, watershed, roads, access and security, forest vegetation, and management for wood, fish and wildlife, managing wildfire, aesthetics and recreation, cultural resources, marketing ecosystem services, regulatory compliance, and tax and business management. This resulted in a ten year forest management action plan. The plan describes the existing vegetation, soils, and wildlife/fisheries habitat on the property and addresses the opportunities for the protection of all natural resources, while helping to meet the landowner's objectives for the management of the property. It provides guidelines for a sound strategy, which reflects the landowner’s management objectives and blends them with a land stewardship ethic. It focuses on the integration of all resources in the management of the property as a valuable legacy for future generations.


A brief description of the plans or programs in place to protect or positively affect identified species, habitats, and/or ecosystems:

There is an active environmental restoration program at the RCESC funded through grants from the USFWS, Tualatin Valley Foundation and others. This program is keyed to restoring wetland, riparian and forest systems at the RCESC. Classes in Environmental Studies and Resources (ESR) and biology are involved with planning and restoration.

Additionally, PCC uses practices that protect wildlife such as the replanting of wetland with fruit producing plants to sustain wildlife. In wooded areas, logs are left in place to rot down and provide nutrition.


Estimated percentage of areas of biodiversity importance that are also protected areas :
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Website URL where information about the institution’s biodiversity initiatives is available:
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Additional documentation to support the submission:

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.