Overall Rating Expired
Overall Score Expired
Liaison Alexis Reyes
Submission Date Oct. 29, 2015
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

Pomona College
OP-23: Waste Diversion

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete Expired Robin Xu
SIO Staff
Sustainability Integration Office
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Materials diverted from the solid waste landfill or incinerator:
740.40 Tons

Materials disposed in a solid waste landfill or incinerator :
510.60 Tons

A brief description of programs, policies, infrastructure investments, outreach efforts, and/or other factors that contributed to the diversion rate, including efforts made during the previous three years:

Initiatives to reduce landfill waste: The replacement of disposable to-go containers and cups with reusable to-go containers and cups in dining halls likely had a significant effect on landfill waste. The Coop Fountain campus restaurant also participates in the reusables initiative. The Sustainability Integration Office (SIO) holds campaigns throughout the year to raise awareness and collect pledges for waste reduction.

Diversion initiatives: The College contracted with the Institution Recycling Network's Surplus Reuse Program and Sustainable Furniture Inc. to donate just above 26 tons of furniture (?) The SIO has added clearer signage about recycling and composting to trash rooms in dormitories. Dining halls transport pre-consumer food waste to the on-campus organic Farm for composting, and the residence hall composting program was expanded with compost bins installed throughout campus. The SIO's ReCoop/Clean Sweep materials reuse program collects abandoned student items during move-out and resells them during move-in. A waste audit is conducted annually and the results publicized to encourage better diversion. The SIO's Green Office Program provides stickers and signage for offices about compost and recycling and encourages diversion through its credit system.

Construction waste diversion: During construction and renovation projects, demolition and construction wastes are diverted through reuse, recycling, and donation. The construction waste diversion rate was at 89% for 2013-2014.


A brief description of any food donation programs employed by the institution:

The Food Rescue program, started in 2007, donates approximately 400 meals per week to feed local homeless people. A group of 15 students picks up prepared but unserved food from the dining halls and delivers it to local shelters every night during the school year. In 2009, the program received a $10,000 grant for expenses and to help begin similar programs at other college campuses. Food Rescue diverted approximately 5 tons of what would have been food waste in 2013-2014.


A brief description of any pre-consumer food waste composting program employed by the institution:

Pomona's dining halls compost non-meat and non-dairy pre-consumer waste, which is transported to the campus Organic Farm for composting. Students can compost pre-consumer waste in the residence halls by checking out a compost bucket (or using their own) from the Sustainability Integration Office, then disposing of those compostable wastes at the Organic Farm or at the nine compost bins placed in residence hall areas around campus.


A brief description of any post-consumer food waste composting program employed by the institution:

Students can compost post-consumer wastes in the dining halls by scraping non-meat and non-dairy wastes (including napkins and other paper scraps) into bins by the tray return. Students can also compost post-consumer waste in the residence halls by checking out a compost bucket (or using their own) from the Sustainability Integration Office, then disposing of those compostable wastes at the Organic Farm or at the nine compost bins placed in residence hall areas around campus. The Coop Fountain campus grill also collects post-consumer compost for the Farm.


Does the institution include the following materials in its waste diversion efforts?:
Yes or No
Paper, plastics, glass, metals, and other recyclable containers Yes
Food donations Yes
Food for animals No
Food composting Yes
Cooking oil Yes
Plant materials composting Yes
Animal bedding composting No
Batteries Yes
Light bulbs Yes
Toner/ink-jet cartridges Yes
White goods (i.e. appliances) Yes
Laboratory equipment Yes
Furniture Yes
Residence hall move-in/move-out waste Yes
Scrap metal Yes
Pallets Yes
Motor oil Yes
Tires Yes

Other materials that the institution includes in its waste diversion efforts:

Food related grease from the dining halls and on campus cafes are diverted to two companies: DarPro (Darling International) and Filta Services.


The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.