Overall Rating Gold - expired
Overall Score 66.74
Liaison Krista Bailey
Submission Date Oct. 20, 2014
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

Pennsylvania State University
OP-8: Building Energy Consumption

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.30 / 6.00 Shelley McKeague
Environmental Compliance Specialist
Engineering Services
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Total building energy consumption, all sources (transportation fuels excluded):
Performance Year Baseline Year
Total building energy consumption 3,221,565 MMBtu 3,425,963 MMBtu

Purchased electricity and steam:
Performance Year Baseline Year
Grid-purchased electricity 822,335 MMBtu 1,128,482 MMBtu
District steam/hot water 2,215,599 MMBtu 2,128,207 MMBtu

Gross floor area of building space::
Performance Year Baseline Year
Gross floor area 20,490,517 Gross Square Feet 18,577,348 Gross Square Feet

Floor area of energy intensive space, performance year::
Floor Area
Laboratory space 1,299,069 Square Feet
Healthcare space 43,342 Square Feet
Other energy intensive space

Degree days, performance year (base 65 °F)::
Degree days (see help icon above)
Heating degree days 6,163
Cooling degree days 632

Source-site ratios::
Source-Site Ratio (see help icon above)
Grid-purchased electricity 3.14
District steam/hot water 1

Start and end dates of the performance year and baseline year (or 3-year periods)::
Start Date End Date
Performance Year July 1, 2012 June 30, 2013
Baseline Year July 1, 2005 June 30, 2006

A brief description of when and why the building energy consumption baseline was adopted:

FY 2005-06 was adopted as the baseline to be consistent with our previous STARS report.


A brief description of any building temperature standards employed by the institution:

Penn State has an Energy Conservation Policy (AD64). Set points are specifically addressed in the policy:

Interior Environment - Every effort will be made to maintain the occupied temperature in all University facilities at 70 degrees in the winter and 75 degrees in the summer. This excludes areas that currently are not heated or cooled and areas with special environmental needs.
-The temperature during low occupancy or unoccupied periods in all University facilities will be allowed to cool down to 60 degrees in the winter and warm up to 85 degrees in the summer. This excludes areas that currently are not heated or cooled and areas with special environmental needs.
-Employees and students with manual control of the equipment that heats or cools their space shall operate the equipment so that the least amount of energy is consumed (example, operate window air conditioning units only when the spaces are occupied).


A brief description of any light emitting diode (LED) lighting employed by the institution:

Light Emitting Diode (LED) technology is used for various applications in many buildings on campus. All new construction or renovation attempts to incorporate the technology. Common applications include replacing incandescent bulbs in elevators, down light applications exit signs and parking lots. They have even been installed in Penn State's -40 degree Blast Freeze in the Food Science Building. 3 Parking decks (Nittany, HUB, East) have LEDs for upper deck lighting, stairways and access lighting with multi-level occupancy sensor and daylight controls. LEDs have been used for underbowl lighting at Beaver Stadium as well as the new logo signs. LEDs have been used in complex lighting locations including the HUB Art Gallery, Earth & Mineral Science Museum and the Nittany Lion Shrine.


A brief description of any occupancy and/or vacancy sensors employed by the institution:

Occupancy sensors are installed in all new construction buildings and as part of all renovation projects in a building. Their wide-spread use includes hallways, offices, classrooms, labs, large spaces, etc. Sensors are typically the ceiling or wall mounted style depending on the space. These are often tied to HVAC and ventilation systems in variable occupancy spaces.


A brief description of any passive solar heating employed by the institution:

n/a


A brief description of any ground-source heat pumps employed by the institution:

At the University Park campus, the Golf Team Clubhouse and the Arboretum utilize a ground-source heat pump. This technology is considered for buildings on the perimeter of campus that do not have access to the district steam system.


A brief description of any cogeneration technologies employed by the institution:

Penn State operates 2 steam plants, both with cogeneration equipment.
At the West Campus Steam Plant, two 1930’s vintage backpressure steam turbines rated at 2.5 mW and 3.5 mW generate electricity to serve Penn State's emergency power needs as well as provide low-pressure steam to campus. These turbines produce approximately 6% of Penn State's total power needs. These are scheduled for replacement by 2016.

At the East Campus Steam Plant, a combustion turbine and heat recovery steam boiler to cogenerate steam and 7MW of electricity was installed in 2011. This operational change has reduced the University's coal consumption as well as increased on-site electricity production. University Park now cogenerates approximately 20% of its power needs.

http://www.opp.psu.edu/about-opp/divisions/ee/util/steam-services


A brief description of any building recommissioning or retrofit program employed by the institution:

Continuous Commissioning (CCx) - Commissioning occurs shortly after a building’s completion to verify if it is functioning according to its design objectives. Implemented in 1998, the University Park Continuous Commissioning Program (CCx) focuses on the re-commissioning, retro-commissioning, and maintenance of campus buildings. The goals of the program are to reduce energy costs and optimize building performance. CCx are “corrective” projects that typically have a 5-year simple payback. The program currently includes 2 CCx Engineers and three 2-person technical service crews. These savings are repurposed toward other energy saving projects.


A brief description of any energy metering and management systems employed by the institution:

Penn State utilizes McKinstry Enterprise Energy Management Suite (EEMS) for tracking of energy commodity purchasing, energy and water consumption, meter data and real time energy data for a select number of buildings. This system allows for accurate tracking of energy consumption and the data is used to inform development of Energy Program projects. Meter data is collected manually by Utility Services and tranferred electronically into the system. Monthly invoice data from suppliers is entered into the system.

Over 50 buildings on campus are smart metered and fed into the EEMS system through the building automation system. These buildings are the largest energy consumers on campus and this interval data allows for real-time energy management strategies to be executed.


A brief description of the institution's program to replace energy-consuming appliances, equipment and systems with high efficiency alternatives:

The University Energy Policy (AD64) addresses appliances and equipment. It covers the purchase of new equipment as well as the operation of current equipment:

5.Appliances
•Employees
•Non-University provided appliances (such as printers, coffee makers, refrigerators, freezers, microwaves, toasters, lamps, televisions, and scanners) may only be used if approved by the department head or supervisor in charge of the area.
•The quantities of University purchased appliances shall be reduced through consolidation to central locations for shared use whenever possible.
•All new or replacement appliances purchased with University funds are required to be ENERGY STAR labeled unless specifically approved by the responsible budget executive. Exceptions are authorized if there are no Energy Star rated appliances manufactured that meet the user’s needs.
•All new or replacement televisions shall be LCD unless there is a justifiable need for the tube based display.
•All appliances shall be turned off when not in use, unless it is detrimental to do so (for example a refrigerator or freezer).

•Students
•All appliances shall be turned off when not in use unless it is detrimental to do so (for example a refrigerator or freezer).
Students are encouraged to bring to campus only appliances with the ENERGY STAR label.
•For additional information regarding appliances that can be used in the residence halls, please refer to the Regulations section of Terms, Conditions, & Regulations on the Housing website.

Office of Physical Plant has a rebate program targeted towards ultra-low research freezers. A $3000 rebate is offered to replace older freezers with new energy efficient models.


A brief description of any energy-efficient landscape design initiatives employed by the institution:

Penn State has a comprehensive landscaping design effort. Design techniques include:
Planting trees for the purpose of providing shade, planting windbreaks to slow winds near buildings, green roofs and minimizing paved areas. On-campus composting and chipping is utilized to reduce greenwaste hauling. Stock is purchased from local growers as appropriate to avoid energy in transportation.


A brief description of any vending machine sensors, lightless machines, or LED-lit machines employed by the institution:

n/a


A brief description of other energy conservation and efficiency initiatives employed by the institution:

The Office of Physical Plant Energy Program administers the behind-the-scenes mechanical, technical and operational aspects of energy efficiency and conservation in buildings and utilities. The Program consists of energy usage monitoring and benchmarking, performance contracting, energy efficiency and continuous commissioning.

Energy Savings Program (ESP)- Penn State has implemented a program following the guidelines of the PA Guaranteed Energy Savings Program. Using an Energy Service Company (ESCO), Penn State awards performance contracts where the entire cost of the project can be recovered through energy savings. ESP projects are large in nature and may combine multiple energy savings efforts into one project. The maximum payback for these projects is 10 years including financing costs. Some projects are performed by internal technical staff. These projects are Capital funded. Multiple ESP projects have been completed at University Park as well projects at multiple commonwealth campuses.

Energy Conservation Measures (ECM) - These projects are smaller in scope and are completed in E&G buildings. The average simple payback is less than 5 years. Solutions in the past have included:
•Improving Steam Traps
•Installing Low-flow water fixtures
•Upgrading Chiller/Chilled Water
•Programming Thermostats
•Reprogramming/ upgrading control systems
•Tuning up systems and equipment
•Switching fuel selection
•Cleaning and flushing HVAC (heating, venting and air conditioning) piping
•Installing room occupancy sensors
•Winter Break shutdown

As opportunities arise, miscellaneous projects are initiated to reduce energy consumption. As buildings are connected to University Park's central chilled water system and standalone systems are removed, a significant energy savings is expected. Power management software has been rolled out to campus computers for energy conservation. A rapid commissioning initiative was implemented to quickly look at HVAC systems in buildings to find low and no-cost energy conservation solutions.

The University is planning for $60 million investment over the next 5 years in these and other energy efficiency and conservation initiatives.

In 2014, Penn State joined the U.S. Department of Energy’s Better Buildings Challenge and pledged to reduce its building portfolio’s energy use by 20 percent over the next decade. With a commitment of 28 million square feet (all campuses except Hershey Medical & Pennsylvania College of Technology), Penn State becomes the largest university in the program.


The website URL where information about the institution’s energy conservation and efficiency initiatives is available:

In 2014, Penn State joined the U.S. Department of Energy’s Better Buildings Challenge and pledged to reduce its building portfolio’s energy use by 20 percent over the next decade. With a commitment of 28 million square feet (all campuses except Hershey Medical & Pennsylvania College of Technology), Penn State becomes the largest university in the program.

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution or simply email your inquiry to stars@aashe.org.