Overall Rating Silver - expired
Overall Score 63.29
Liaison Elaine Goetz
Submission Date Feb. 20, 2018
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

Ohio University
PA-7: Affordability and Access

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.36 / 4.00 Jill Lallier
Senior Associate Director
Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships, Student Financial Aid
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have policies and programs to make it accessible and affordable to low-income students?:
Yes

A brief description of any policies and programs to minimize the cost of attendance for low-income students:

The OHIO Guarantee is a cohort based, level-rate tuition, housing, dining and fee model assuring a set of comprehensive rates for the pursuit of an undergraduate degree. Rates remain unchanged for four years, 12 consecutive semesters offering predictability, transparency and stability of costs.

Low-income Ohio University students who file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) may be eligible for need-based aid, including grants, subsidized loans and/or federal work-study. Scholarships are also available for low-income/economically disadvantaged students (see below).


A brief description of any programs to equip the institution’s faculty and staff to better serve students from low-income backgrounds:

Ohio University's Office of Student Financial Aid and Scholarships is well-equipped to serve students from economically-challenged communities and backgrounds. Staff from this office regularly attend university meetings to make academic staff members aware of available resources and programs.


A brief description of the institution’s programs to guide and prepare students and families from low-income backgrounds for higher education:

OHIO First Scholars began in 2014 to assist First Generation College Students. A higher proportion of these students are considered low income. The program encourages this special population of students to engage with faculty and other students in both academic and mentoring experiences. OHIO First Scholars is located in the Allen Student Advising Center, providing both parents and students a location and connected resource to navigate the initial college experience.

The College Adjustment Program (CAP) is supported through a TRIO Student Support Services grant from the US Department of Education and by Ohio University. CAP has helped students adjust to the demands of college life since 1979 at OHIO and assists students as they work toward graduation, a career, and/or graduate school. The CAP staff is committed to collaborating with our participants through a wide variety of academic support services at no cost to students. Through supportive and professional academic advising, CAP provides opportunities for academic and intellectual development, assists students in understanding the various graduation requirements, and gives students a home base and physical place on campus where they know they will be supported. For 34 years, CAP has been a positive force for student success and enrichment at Ohio University. All CAP services are designed to increase a student's chance of success.

LINKS program: LINKS is a peer-mentoring program for first-year multicultural students. For over 25 years, the LINKS Program has been the cornerstone of support and assistance for first-year students at Ohio University. Successful upper-class students serve as mentors to LINKS participants. Peer mentors serve as role models to the first-year students and assist in the transition from high school to college. LINKS helps first-year students navigate the college experience by making students aware of the available university resources, services, and offices.


A brief description of the institution's scholarships for low-income students:

The OHIO Signature Awards, a set of scholarships and grants is designed to honor and assist Ohio University students on the Athens campus in accordance with the University's twin missions of excellence and access. The program includes generous merit-based scholarships, supportive need-based grants, and a set of awards unique to Ohio University that blend both merit- and need-based criteria.

Appalachian Scholars: Appalachian Ohio is home to a large portion of the state's economically disadvantaged students. The Appalachian Scholars Program was created to provide academically qualified students who reside in Appalachian counties with the financial resources and the support system they need.

The Ohio College Opportunity Grant (OCOG) is a state-funded grant program available to residents of the state of Ohio only. You must complete the FAFSA by October 1 of each award year in order to ensure consideration. OCOG is awarded based on total family income and the Expected Family Contribution (EFC) from the FAFSA. The family's total income has to be equal to or less than $75,000, and the EFC has to be equal to or less than 2190. For those who qualify, the OCOG is available for full-time and part-time enrollment.

Urban Scholars: The Urban Scholars program was created to provide academically qualified students who graduated from an urban school district in the State of Ohio with the financial resources and the support system they need to seize their opportunity.:

Templeton Scholars: The Templeton Scholars Program provides valuable educational opportunities designed to enrich the intellectual experiences of talented students from disproportionately represented populations.

OHIO Promise Scholars: The merit-based OHIO Promise Scholarship Program provides valuable educational opportunities designed to enrich the intellectual experiences of talented students from disproportionately represented ­populations.:


A brief description of the institution’s targeted outreach to recruit students from low-income backgrounds:

We work with community-based organizations that support college access, such as College NOW of Greater Cleveland and I Know I Can in central Ohio, to support students engaged in the college search process. We offer application fee-waivers for any student demonstrating need, including at special application nights that provide access to the technology and information needed to submit the online application. We invite and host several special groups to visit campus, including TRIO-based programs such as Upward Bound, and we support the communities we serve by attending college info nights, targeted recruitment fairs, and other events that support a college-going culture among low-income communities. Our regional campuses and centers extend the mission of Ohio University throughout southeastern Ohio, and all of our locations work closely to provide access and information to low-income families in their communities. We also have very strong transfer recruitment pipelines, enabling students to transfer to Ohio University after completing a portion of their education at a less expense community college partner.


A brief description of the institution’s other policies or programs to make the institution accessible and affordable to low-income students:

We offer an application fee-waiver for an student demonstrating financial need. We participate in NACAC, ACT, and College Board fee-waiver programs. The OHIO Guarantee, new for fall 2015, offers a fixed-rate structure for required tuition, fees, room, and meal plans over the course of four academic years or twelve semesters, providing predictability and transparency in OHIO’s costs. Ohio University does have a monthly payment plan option, through the Office of the Bursar, that allows any student the ability to split the balance of their current semester charges into installments.


Does the institution have policies and programs to support non-traditional students?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s scholarships provided specifically for part-time students:

A limited number of endowed/restricted institutional scholarships are available to eligible non-traditional and/or part-time students.

For example, the Ohio College Opportunity Grant (OCOG) is a state-funded grant program available to residents of the state of Ohio only. OCOG is awarded based on total family income and the Expected Family Contribution (EFC) from the FAFSA. For those who qualify, the OCOG is available for full-time and part-time enrollment.


A brief description of the institution’s on-site child care facility, partnership with a local facility, and/or subsidies or financial support to help meet the child care needs of students:

On-Site Child Care Facility: The Child Development Center at Ohio University opened in September 1972. It is the early childhood laboratory within the Gladys W. and David H. Patton College of Education. As one of the only centers in the area that serves children ages six weeks to five years, we serve as a model for best practices in Southeastern Ohio. We believe that all children and parents have the potential to be an integral part of our community.


A brief description of the institution’s other policies and programs to support non-traditional students:

Information regarding policies and programs that support non-traditional students are online (http://www.ohio.edu/univcollege/support/handbook.cfm).


Does the institution wish to pursue Part 2 of this credit (tracking accessibility and affordability)? (If data is not available, select 'No'):
Yes

The percentage of entering students that are low-income (0-100):
27.60

The graduation/success rate for low-income students (0-100):
52

On average, the percentage of need that was met for students who were awarded any need-based aid (e.g. as reported to the U.S. Common Data Set initiative, item H2) (0-100):
56

The percentage of students graduating with no interest-bearing student loan debt or for whom no out-of-pocket tuition is required (i.e. the percentage of graduates who have not taken out interest-bearing loans) (0-100):
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Estimated percentage of students that participate in or directly benefit from the institution’s policies and programs to support low-income and non-traditional students (0-100):
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The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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Data entered on 1/31/18 and provided by Jill Lallier Senior Associate Director Office of Student Financial Aid and Scholarships Ohio University and Ebony Green Assistant Dean of University College Advising and Student Services data on Ohio First Scholars 2/1/18

Data on % entering low income students and graduation/success rate from IPEDS Graduation Rate Survey 2017-18, provided by Barbra Wharton, Associate Provost for Institutional Research and Effectiveness, Institutional Research, on 2/14/18.

Data Entered by Benton Wright

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution or simply email your inquiry to stars@aashe.org.