Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 68.35
Liaison Jessica Bast
Submission Date Aug. 9, 2022

STARS v2.2

North Carolina State University
OP-18: Waste Minimization and Diversion

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 4.50 / 8.00 Jessica Bast
Sustainability Program Coordinator
University Sustainability Office
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Figures needed to determine total waste generated (and diverted):
Performance Year Baseline Year
Materials recycled 1,232 Tons 1,710.33 Tons
Materials composted 2,395 Tons 809.97 Tons
Materials donated or re-sold 284 Tons 0 Tons
Materials disposed through post-recycling residual conversion 0 Tons 0 Tons
Materials disposed in a solid waste landfill or incinerator 2,502 Tons 3,919.83 Tons
Total waste generated 6,413 Tons 6,440.13 Tons

A brief description of the residual conversion facility:
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Start and end dates of the performance year and baseline year (or three-year periods):
Start Date End Date
Performance Period July 1, 2020 June 30, 2021
Baseline Period July 1, 2004 June 30, 2005

A brief description of when and why the waste generation baseline was adopted:

The fiscal year 2005 provides a sufficient amount of data to benchmark waste reduction efforts against.


Figures needed to determine "Weighted Campus Users”:
Performance Year Baseline Year
Number of students resident on-site 8,273 6,429
Number of employees resident on-site 101 224
Number of other individuals resident on-site 138 0
Total full-time equivalent student enrollment 31,969 25,884.50
Full-time equivalent of employees 9,297 7,169.30
Full-time equivalent of students enrolled exclusively in distance education 1,528 960.25
Weighted campus users 32,035 25,733.41

Total waste generated per weighted campus user:
Performance Year Baseline Year
Total waste generated per weighted campus user 0.20 Tons 0.25 Tons

Percentage reduction in total waste generated per weighted campus user from baseline:
20.01

Percentage of materials diverted from the landfill or incinerator by recycling, composting, donating or re-selling, performance year:
60.99

Percentage of materials diverted from the landfill or incinerator (including up to 10 percent attributable to post-recycling residual conversion):
60.99

In the waste figures reported above, has the institution recycled, composted, donated and/or re-sold the following materials?:
Yes or No
Paper, plastics, glass, metals, and other recyclable containers Yes
Food Yes
Cooking oil Yes
Plant materials Yes
Animal bedding Yes
White goods (i.e. appliances) Yes
Electronics Yes
Laboratory equipment Yes
Furniture Yes
Residence hall move-in/move-out waste Yes
Scrap metal Yes
Pallets Yes
Tires Yes
Other (please specify below) No

A brief description of other materials the institution has recycled, composted, donated and/or re-sold:

In addition to the items above, NC State also recycles toner and printer cartridges, batteries, and oil, antifreeze and filters.


Materials intended for disposal but subsequently recovered and reused on campus, performance year:
255.08 Tons

Does the institution use single stream recycling to collect standard recyclables in common areas?:
Yes

Does the institution use dual stream recycling to collect standard recyclables in common areas?:
No

Does the institution use multi-stream recycling to collect standard recyclables in common areas?:
No

Average contamination rate for the institution’s recycling program:
6.60

A brief description of any recycling quality control mechanisms employed:

All of the waste bins at NC State have accurate signage to assist the community in properly disposing of their waste and reducing contamination. The Waste Reduction and Recycling (WRR) website also contains a comprehensive list of possible waste items and how to dispose of them: https://recycling.ncsu.edu/recycling-guide/. University departments can also request presentations from the WRR team to educate employees on how to properly sort their waste.


A brief description of the institution's waste-related behavior change initiatives:

NC State University is striving for a 70% waste diversion by 2022. To achieve this goal, it has implemented key diversion programs that focus on source reduction, increased recycling, and expanded composting opportunities. Zero Waste Workplace is one such program. The primary components of a Zero Waste Workplace include bin optimization, composting, specialized waste collections, and ongoing presentations and trainings from the Waste Reduction and Recycling team.


A brief description of the institution's waste audits and other initiatives to assess its materials management efforts and identify areas for improvement:

We typically conduct between one and three waste audits per year. In FY19-20 we participated in a waste audit with Kessler Consulting in July, and also conducted our own waste audits at Schaub Hall and Weisiger-Brown Athletic Facility. Waste audits consist of sorting landfill waste into ~23 different categories to identify which materials we should prioritize with our diversion efforts.


A brief description of the institution's procurement policies designed to prevent waste:

"In the Sustainability Standard Operating Procedures (Sustainability SOP), section 2.5.3 deals with the procurement of paper products and initiatives that minimize paper use. It states that all paper and tissue products purchased be made from 50% post-consumer
recycled content. In the absence of 50% post-consumer, the
highest post-consumer recycled content or highest pre-consumer recycled
material content available shall be purchased.

The Sustainability SOP also deals with photocopy practices that minimize paper use and reduce costs. These measures include double-sided printing and photocopying, the use of digital file management and imaging software, enhancing capabilities for electronic document creation and storage, eliminating unnecessary printing wherever possible, and using the maximum margins allowable by University branding guidelines to fit more content on each sheet of paper."


A brief description of the institution's surplus department or formal office supplies exchange program that facilitates reuse of materials:

Surplus sales are held twice a month and are open to the public. A wide variety of items are usually available including laboratory equipment, computers, monitors, desks, tables, office chairs and filing cabinets.


A brief description of the institution's platforms to encourage peer-to-peer exchange and reuse:

"Website (recycling.ncsu.edu)
Social Media (@NCStateRecycles for Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, TikTok, YouTube, Pinterest)
Campus Moodle for non-credited classes (Reporter.ncsu.edu)
Campus EBillboard System for digital educational signage & graphics (billboard.ncsu.edu)
Campus Student Organization Marketing/Volunteer Hub (GetInvolved.ncsu.edu)"


A brief description of the institution's limits on paper and ink consumption:

Sustainability Standard Operation Procedures: 2.5.3 Procurement of paper products and initiatives that minimize paper
use
• Purchase paper and tissue products made from 50% post-consumer
recycled content. In the absence of 50% post-consumer, purchase the
highest post-consumer recycled content or highest pre-consumer recycled
material content.
• Use photocopy practices that minimize paper use and reduce costs
including:
o Duplex (double-sided) printing and photocopying
o Use of digital file management and imaging software
o Enhance capabilities for electronic document creation and storage
o Eliminating unnecessary printing
o Using the maximum margins allowable by University branding
guidelines to fit more content on each sheet of paper
• By January 1, 2015, 50% of paper products will comply with this regulation
and will increase by 25% each year until 100% of all paper and tissue
products comply.


A brief description of the institution's initiatives to make materials available online by default rather than printing them:

NC State does not print an undergraduate catalog or schedule of courses, both are available online.

The Sustainability SOP has more information on the University's efforts to reduce printing and paper usage. https://sustainability.ncsu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/Sustainability-SOP.pdf


A brief description of the institution's program to reduce residence hall move-in/move-out waste:

During move-in, additional cardboard dumpsters and signage are placed on campus for students to use as they unpack new items or discard moving boxes. Plastic film and expanded polystyrene are also collected during this time. For move-out, there is a Wolf Pack-N-Give collaborative program between University Housing and NC State Waste Reduction and Recycling that diverts the materials often discarded by students moving off of campus at the end of each year. By collecting, organizing, and donating items that would have gone into the landfill, our students, community, and planet benefit! Currently, items are donated to TROSA, Feed the Pack Food Pantry, and the Food Bank of Central and Eastern North Carolina.


A brief description of the institution's programs or initiatives to recover and reuse other materials intended for disposal:

During move-out, students can participate in the Wolf Pack-n-Give program to donate items like clothing, furniture, home goods, and unopened and non-perishable food. Throughout the year, students and employees can donate their unwanted and unopened food to NC State's Feed the Pack food pantry, which is open to all university community members.


Website URL where information about the institution’s waste minimization and diversion efforts is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution or simply email your inquiry to stars@aashe.org.