Overall Rating Gold - expired
Overall Score 65.87
Liaison Lindsay Batchelor
Submission Date Jan. 5, 2016
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

North Carolina State University
OP-22: Waste Minimization

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 1.00 / 5.00 Analis Fulghum
Program Manager
Waste Reduction and Recycling
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Waste generated::
Performance Year Baseline Year
Materials recycled 2,537.04 Tons 1,710.33 Tons
Materials composted 1,475.21 Tons 809.97 Tons
Materials reused, donated or re-sold 251.85 Tons 0 Tons
Materials disposed in a solid waste landfill or incinerator 4,281.95 Tons 3,919.83 Tons

Figures needed to determine "Weighted Campus Users”::
Performance Year Baseline Year
Number of residential students 7,357 6,429
Number of residential employees 237 224
Number of in-patient hospital beds 0 0
Full-time equivalent enrollment 29,937 25,884.50
Full-time equivalent of employees 8,696.10 7,169.30
Full-time equivalent of distance education students 1,565.75 960.25

Start and end dates of the performance year and baseline year (or three-year periods):
Start Date End Date
Performance Year July 1, 2014 June 30, 2015
Baseline Year July 1, 2004 June 30, 2005

A brief description of when and why the waste generation baseline was adopted:

The fiscal year 2005 provides a sufficient amount of data to benchmark waste reduction efforts against.


A brief description of any (non-food) waste audits employed by the institution:

Waste Characterization Study April 2015: Determine the composition of garbage disposed in various types of buildings (33) across campus. 2 samples/bldg (4 samples from Talley Student Union), consisting of waste generated over a 24-hour period. Samples sorted into 47 distinct material categories. Results used to identify target materials and locations for increased recycling/diversion and aid the University in reaching its recycling goals.


A brief description of any institutional procurement policies designed to prevent waste:

In the Sustainability Standard Operating Procedures (Sustainability SOP), section 2.5.3 deals with the procurement of paper products and initiatives that minimize paper use. It states that all paper and tissue products purchased be made from 50% post-consumer
recycled content. In the absence of 50% post-consumer, the
highest post-consumer recycled content or highest pre-consumer recycled
material content available shall be purchased.

The Sustainability SOP also deals with photocopy practices that minimize paper use and reduce costs. These measures include double-sided printing and photocopying, the use of digital file management and imaging software, enhancing capabilities for electronic document creation and storage, eliminating unnecessary printing wherever possible, and using the maximum margins allowable by University branding guidelines to fit more content on each sheet of paper.
By January 1, 2015, 50% of paper products complied with this regulation. The goal is for this to increase by 25% each year until 100% of all paper and tissue
products comply.


A brief description of any surplus department or formal office supplies exchange program that facilitates reuse of materials:

Surplus sales are held twice a month and are open to the public. A wide variety of items are usually available including laboratory equipment, computers, monitors, desks, tables, office chairs and filing cabinets.


A brief description of the institution's efforts to make materials available online by default rather than printing them:

NC State does not print an undergraduate catalog or schedule of courses, both are available online.

The Sustainability SOP has more information on the University's efforts to reduce printing and paper usage. https://sustainability.ncsu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/Sustainability-SOP.pdf


A brief description of any limits on paper and ink consumption employed by the institution:

Sustainability Standard Operation Procedures: 2.5.3 Procurement of paper products and initiatives that minimize paper
use
• Purchase paper and tissue products made from 50% post-consumer
recycled content. In the absence of 50% post-consumer, purchase the
highest post-consumer recycled content or highest pre-consumer recycled
material content.
• Use photocopy practices that minimize paper use and reduce costs
including:
o Duplex (double-sided) printing and photocopying
o Use of digital file management and imaging software
o Enhance capabilities for electronic document creation and storage
o Eliminating unnecessary printing
o Using the maximum margins allowable by University branding
guidelines to fit more content on each sheet of paper
• By January 1, 2015, 50% of paper products will comply with this regulation
and will increase by 25% each year until 100% of all paper and tissue
products comply."


A brief description of any programs employed by the institution to reduce residence hall move-in/move-out waste:

Move In: Additional cardboard dumpsters and signage are placed on campus for students to use as they unpack new items or discard moving boxes. Volunteers from Greek Life helped students to break down and recycle cardboard boxes during move-in.

Move Out: Partnered with Feed the Pack Food Pantry and Triangle Residential Options for Substance Abusers (TROSA) for the 2015 Wolf Pack N Give Move Out Program. During move out 2014 and 2015, plastic bags were distributed to students for clothing, shoes and bedding. This helped educate them about the program as well as keep the pack rat storage containers better organized.


A brief description of any other (non-food) waste minimization strategies employed by the institution:

The Sustainability SOP has several places where waste minimization is the focus- in both the Purchasing and the Waste Reduction and Recycling sections. https://sustainability.ncsu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/Sustainability-SOP.pdf


A brief description of any food waste audits employed by the institution:

As part of the post-consumer pilot at Talley Student Center, NC State Stewards performed a visual contamination inspection in the compost bins. Data was collected on the success of the program to promote further expansion of the program.


A brief description of any programs and/or practices to track and reduce pre-consumer food waste in the form of kitchen food waste, prep waste and spoilage:

University Dining has been utilizing our food service software, CBORD, to properly forecast correct food amounts for meal periods in hopes to reduce food waste. By utilizing this software and working with our managers to ensure we are preparing the proper amount of food, University Dining can reduce the amount of food waste that is generated during food preparation.


A brief description of programs and/or practices to track and reduce post-consumer food waste:

University Dining has worked with the NC State Stewards to educate consumers about food waste through Weigh-the -Waste programs. These programs aide in making customers aware of how much they are putting on their plates, and how much waste con be produced. Additionally, a student chapter of the Food Recovery Network has been formed and started a pilot of collecting food waste for donation this semester.


A brief description of the institution's provision of reusable and/or third party certified compostable to-go containers for to-go food and beverage items (in conjunction with a composting program):

The all you care to eat facilities utilize reusable clam shell containers. This program has proven to be very successful in reducing disposable plastics in the dining halls. There are plans to initiate this same system in some of the retail venues as well.


A brief description of the institution's provision of reusable service ware for “dine in” meals and reusable and/or third party certified compostable service ware for to-go meals (in conjunction with a composting program):

In the all you care to eat facilities, all the service ware is reusable. These products are used by the students and then washed in the energy efficient dish rooms. In the retail locations, strides are being made to transition to all compostable containers. The first location where we will be utilizing these compostable containers is going the be On The Oval, located on Centennial campus. The plan is to replace all plastic options with containers that can be composted.


A brief description of any discounts offered to customers who use reusable containers (e.g. mugs) instead of disposable or compostable containers in to-go food service operations:

The campaign, One Less Cup, is a collaboration between University Dining, Waste Reduction and Recycling and the University Sustainability Office. The program features stickers that can be applied to any mug or cup and then used to receive $.10 off fountain drink and drip coffee purchases. The One Less Cup program is utilized in the Atrium Food Court, Talley Student Union, the Oval Food Court, on campus convenient stores and cafes.


A brief description of other dining services waste minimization programs and initiatives:

University Dining removed the trays from campus dining halls in 2008 which not only saves water for washing but reduces the amount of food that students take and therefore waste.


The website URL where information about the institution’s waste minimization initiatives is available:

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.