Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 68.84
Liaison Kalyna Procyk
Submission Date June 6, 2018
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

Muhlenberg College
OP-23: Rainwater Management

Status Score Responsible Party
2.00 / 2.00 David Rabold
Capital Projects Manager
Planning
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Which of the following best describes the institution’s approach to rainwater management?:
Comprehensive policies, plans or guidelines that require LID practices for all new projects

A brief description of the institution’s green infrastructure and LID practices:

There is a rainwater harvesting system attached to the Tree House
There is a green roof on top of the Seegers Union building.
There are 5 Rain Gardens near the Walz, Brown, and Taylor dormitories, where the storm water is collected by the vegetation.
We cannot have water gardens because of the limestone deposits in the soil/ground.
There is a detention active stormwater management system near the village and rehearsal house that captures stormwater and pumps it up to the hillside to be trickled down the hillside by a soaker hose in order to recharge the groundwater.
None of the roof gutters wash out onto the grass, instead they are collected by a water retention area between and under the New Science Building and the Brown residence hall. This releases the water slowly after a major storm. We also have another one under the library and under the football field/track.



A copy of the institution’s rainwater management policy, plan, and/or guidelines:
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A brief description of the institution’s rainwater management policy, plan, and/or guidelines that supports the responses above:

Muhlenberg College follows all state and county and city regulations including, NPDES National Pollutants Discharge Elimination System permitting and regulation standards (http://water.epa.gov/polwaste/npdes/), on all new projects required for reducing storm water runoff rates. Muhlenberg has incorporated rain gardens, green roofing and a water detention system in efforts to reduce peak runoff volumes. During construction and renovation project Muhlenberg requires basin filters to catch debris. Muhlenberg has developed and installed a rain barrel system to collect rain water for use for the community garden.


The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
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Additional documentation to support the submission:
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Rainwater filtering systems employed by the institution to treat water prior to release:
There are 5 Rain Gardens near the Walz, Brown, and Taylor dormitories, where the storm water is collected by the vegetation.
There is a Green Roof (vegetated) located on the roof of the Wood Dining Commons.
The campus has eight water retention mechanisms on campus. There is a basin which pumps the water back up a hill to recharge the hillside with water and prevent flooding of a nearby lake. Also, other places on campus retain stormwater and slowly discharge it into the sewers.
Bioswales on campus (vegetated, compost or stone):
A mixture of no-mow grasses and fescues are utilized for the campus vegetated swales
Other rainwater management technologies or strategies employed:
Underground detention systems, coupled with flow reduction orifices are used to reduce stormwater discharge velocity and stream flooding. An active detention pond with a sump pump recirculating system is utilized to provide groundwater recharge at the southern edge of the campus. Green roof on portion of student union improves water quality and increases water retention.

Muhlenberg College follows all state and county and city regulations including, NPDES National Pollutants Discharge Elimination System permitting and regulation standards (http://water.epa.gov/polwaste/npdes/), on all new projects required for reducing storm water runoff rates. Muhlenberg has incorporated rain gardens, green roofing and a water detention system in efforts to reduce peak runoff volumes. During construction and renovation project Muhlenberg requires basin filters to catch debris.

Tim Korn and David Rabold contributed to the reporting of this credit.

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.