Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 70.85
Liaison Amy Butler
Submission Date Feb. 28, 2019
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

Michigan State University
PA-2: Sustainability Planning

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.75 / 4.00 Amy Butler
Campus Sustainability Director
MSU Sustainability
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have a published strategic plan or equivalent guiding document that includes sustainability at a high level? :
Yes

A brief description of how the institution’s strategic plan or equivalent guiding document addresses sustainability:

"MSU's strategic plan, Bolder by Design, is the next evolution of it's previous strategic plan, Boldness by Design. In the plan, we continue the core imperatives - Enhance the Student Experience, Increase Research Opportunities, Expand International Reach, Enhance Community, Economic, and Family Life, and Strengthen Stewardship - and adding a sixth imperative, Foster a Culture of High Performance.

Sustainability is addressed in the Strengthen Stewardship imperative, including specific strategies for fulfillment of the Energy Transition plan, establishing a water conservation strategy, setting more aggressive waste reduction goals and campus engagement.

The Energy Transition Plan (ETP) Reaffirmation of Intent outlines MSU's sustainability goals in relation to campus mobility, renewable energy and greenhouse gas reduction, and campus research integration. The ETP clearly define's MSU's goal to reach 100% renewable energy dependance with no specified date, instead outlining key steps that will take us there. These steps are detailed as objectives: Stakeholder engagement, investment in energy technologies that have a five year (or less) payback, embed sustainability in the campus fabric, and advance sustainability in infrastructure. Please see attached for further details. "


A copy of the strategic plan:
The website URL where the strategic plan is publicly available:
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Does the institution have a published sustainability plan (apart from what is reported above)? :
No

A copy of the sustainability plan:
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The website URL where the sustainability plan is publicly available:
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Does the institution have a published climate action plan (apart from what is reported above)? :
Yes

A copy of the climate action plan:
The website URL where the climate action plan is publicly available:
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Does the institution have other published plans that address sustainability or include measurable sustainability objectives (e.g. campus master plan, physical campus plan, diversity plan, human resources plan)? :
Yes

A list of other published plans that address sustainability, including public website URLs (if available):

MSU Mobility Plan;http://www.adminsv.msu.edu/mobility/Mobility%20Report%20-%20final2.pdf Energy Transition Plan: http://ipf.msu.edu/_files/pdfs/energy-transition-plan.pdf Master Plan: http://ipf.msu.edu/_files/pdfs/campus-master-plan-2017.pdf Tree Management Plan: MSU Stormwater Management Plan: http://msu-water.msu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/MSU-SWMP-2013-with-2014-Updates_V2.pdf 2017 Sustainability Report: http://ipf.msu.edu/_files/pdfs/etp-five-year-review-aug-2017.pdf also Division Strategic Plans (IPF, RHS) and some Colleges and Schools are embedding sustainability as a part of their organization objectives. for example, School of Planning, Design, and Construction just voted to include sustainability as a key part of the school's focus.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Curriculum?:
No

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Curriculum and the published plans in which each objective is included:

The Graduate School at MSU has developed a strategic plan for 2019-2024. Published in 2018, this plan states its measurable goals during that timeframe for curriculum:

- By 2019, build on our developing network with Wayne State University and seven historically black college and universities (HBCUs) to submit a proposal for the NSF’s Alliance of Graduate Education and the Professoriate (AGEP) program.

- Establish five new 3+2 joint bachelors-masters programs between MSU departments and pattern MSIs.

- Conduct a data-based program review every 3-5 years of each graduate program and collaborate with units to develop and support their strategic directions.

https://grad.msu.edu/strategicplan


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Research?:
No

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Research and the published plans in which each objective is included:

The College of Engineering published a five-year strategic plan in 2016 and committed to several objectives in the area of sustainability within research for the college. These objectives include increasing the number of endowed chairs in the college by at least ten and paired with that increase will be a mentoring program to properly induct new faculty into their positions and integrate them into their departments smoothly. Additionally, the College of Engineering pledges to increase its average research expenditures for tenure-system faculty member to over $400,000annum. The College of Engineering supports sustainability research (see research inventory in AC9), with significant support for autonomous vehicles and sustainability technology.

https://www.egr.msu.edu/sites/default/files/content/coe_strategic_plan_shortform_04oct16.pdf

MSU’ s College of Social Science 2017 Strategic Plan identifies Research excellence as a goal area in the plan” “Our scholars engage in sustained research excellence that demonstrates though leadership. We will increase national and international recognition for top-tier and impactful research that addresses societal changes.” This commitment also pledges to increase faculty research productivity by 50% and support 3-5 thematic areas of research that advance the College’s ability to address societal issues.

http://www.socialscience.msu.edu/files/5215/3555/7831/StratPlan-082918-spreads.pdf

http://www.socialscience.msu.edu/about-us/overview/strategic-plan/

MSU’s Global Impact initiative (GI2) was launched in 2014, and its published commitment is to hire 100 new research faculty before 2020 with a focus in key areas of research. Many aspects of the target areas interface with sustainability. This initiative has made tremendous progress; MSU has hired over 70 new faculty whose work is in exciting and innovative areas, such as genomics, engineering, nutrition, medicine, and other areas.

https://vp.research.msu.edu/global-impact

The Sustainable Michigan Endowed Project (SMEP) was established by an endowment from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation in 2003 “to serve as a catalyst and convener of interdisciplinary dialogue and research around existing and emerging sustainability topics.” In 2016 SMEP began a new effort called the SMEP Scholars Program. The Scholars Program seeks to develop the next generation of sustainability scholars at MSU through an intentional, interdisciplinary community of practice including the Scholars and SMEP Executive Committee faculty members. This program is currently requesting nominations for its’ third cohort, 2019-2020. It is a funding opportunity for incoming Ph.D. students at Michigan State University.

The ESPP program provides additional funding support to engage scholars in research related to sustainable issues. Doctoral Recruiting Fellowship. The Environmental Science and Policy Program (ESPP) offers one-year Doctoral Recruiting Fellowships for students who will matriculate during the fall semester. The goal of these fellowships is to attract the strongest possible cohort of students to pursue doctoral education focused on the environment at MSU. Students MUST be nominated by their intended home department. Students may not apply directly for these fellowships but should work with their intended home department to prepare their application materials.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Campus Engagement?:
No

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Campus Engagement and the published plans in which each objective is included:

MSU’s Pack Up. Pitch In. Campaign has been an ongoing move-out landfill diversion initative since 1996. This effort has increased each year, as has its outreach to student and engagement with them. In 2015, the Residence Education and Housing Services (REHS) Marketing and Communication Plan states its goals for the program as the following: Support “Pack Up. Pitch In.” campaign communications to residents. Focus times include move in, move out and semester break. Create promotional material for neighborhood engagement events. These efforts increased across campus, and the program recently celebrated 20 years of active engagement on campus. Spring of 2017, the marker for the 20th year of the program, was the most successful move-out collection of surplus clothing, food, personal care items and household items yet. More than 900 pounds of personal care items and more than 4,000 pounds of nonperishable food were collected. https://rhs.msu.edu/news/pack-pitch-celebrates-20-years

The ultimate vision for this program and for further engagement on campus for the 2013-2023 period are the following:

Vision: Ensuring MSU’s long-term sustainability through innovative and balanced strategies that support: Stewardship, Fiscal responsibility, Partnership

Mission: Dedication to promoting and advancing environmental stewardship throughout RHS and MSU by providing a high level of leadership to meet the environmental stewardship goals of MSU and RHS. 1. Energy conservation strategies 2. Water conservation strategies 3. Food waste strategies 4. Sustainable procurement strategies 5. Connecting sustainability, education and research 6. Materials diversion and reuse 7. Social responsibility. See attached for further information on these goals. These goals are backed by engagement initiatives from the Residential and Hospitality Division (RHS), Such as Clean Plates at State, a weekly waste diversion engagement tool, wherein staff and volunteers attend one lunch and dinner at a campus dining hall and weigh the waste of all patrons who frequent that hall for that meal hour. This engagement has increased awareness of food waste, drawn attention to trayless dining options, and helped to reduce food waste on campus. In fall of 2018, 516,818 lbs. were wasted, compared to 535,072 in fall of 2017. Less food wasted a semester later, along with detailed data on waste throughout halls since 2012 (see attached), demonstrates the effectiveness of engagement throughout campus in sustainability.

MSU’s engagement with the campus through its website and social media efforts can be noted through the increase in interaction on such platforms during the Go Green Campaign, which concluded in 2017. This engagement resulted in a 50% outreach increase in 2015, which jumped to a 50.4% increase in engagement in the last three months of the campaign in 2017 (See attached). Such online engagement demonstrates the outreach efforts across campus to interact with its students, staff, and faculty to build a lasting sustainability plan to carry the university forward.

Residence Education and Housing Services (REHS) works to engage the students of MSU on a daily basis, and it is they who have the responsibility of directly engaging students in campus living and dining. The Residence Education and Housing Services 2018-2019 Marketing and Communication Plan outlines the university’s goals for such engagement through student interaction and awareness. The Plan outlines objectives in marketing, and these objectives are part of the larger strategy of engaging students across campus:

Goal 1: Increase awareness of our offerings and engagement with students, families, staff and members of the MSU community in order to increase brand loyalty and retention in on-campus housing. This goal increases efficiency of residence hall energy consumption and works to build the culture of the residence halls on campus.

Objectives:

- Secure 95% occupancy at University Village.

- Secure 95% occupancy for family housing, apartments and townhouses at 1855 Place.

- Increase retention rate of rising sophomore students to on-campus housing to for 2019.20.

- Increase retention rate of international students to on-campus housing for 2019-20.

- Establish a baseline for measuring traffic to the new Live On website.

- Establish a baseline for measuring engagement across all social media platforms.

Goal 2: Increase the frequency of messages regarding resources to on-campus residents and families in order to promote the academic success of on-campus residents. This goal aims to provide resources to on-campus residence, including access to affordable food, cultural areas on campus (study areas, the LGBTQ and International Centers), and others across campus.

Objectives:

- Increase ratings for Student Learning and Development in the On-Campus Resident Survey in the following areas by: Feel connected to MSU; Be academically successful

- Increase in ratings regarding academic success between Move-in Survey and On-Campus Resident Survey.

For the full report, please see attached: PA2-Transport, Campus EN, Grounds

The Student Organic Farm (SOF) is actively working to recruit volunteers, and the SOF has collaborated with faculty and student to develop strategies to do so. Among these efforts was a published strategy by one of the farm managers: Marketing and Retention Strategies to Attract and Keep Great Farm Workers.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Public Engagement?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Public Engagement and the published plans in which each objective is included:

"The Energy Transition Plan was approved by the Michigan State University Board of Trustees in April 2012. The Plan has 3 goals - 1. Improve the Physical Environment; 2. Invest in Sustainable Energy Research and Development; and 3. Become and Educational Leader in Sustainable Energy.
In addition MSU Campus Sustainability focuses on external outreach for overall sustainability in its own strategic plan which includes an annual ""conversation with the President"" event inviting community stakeholders to engage with the energy/sustainability discussion on campus, sustainability recognition gala for community stakeholders, hosting various nationally coordinated engagement programs such as Power Dialog, etc.

The third goal of the Energy Transition Plan speaks to public engagement specifically. Strategies include: Educate stakeholders about MSU's longstanding commitment to and ongoing research in sustainable energy and Share MSU's energy transition process and lessons learned from it.

The MSU Campus Sustainability's strategic plan addressing public engagement includes the following strategy: Create a toolkit for community partners and peers (case studies, data, how to create Surplus/Recycling/Sustainability Program)"


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Air & Climate?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Air & Climate and the published plans in which each objective is included:

"The Energy Transition Plan was approved by the Michigan State University Board of Trustees in April 2012. The Plan has 3 goals - 1. Improve the Physical Environment; 2. Invest in Sustainable Energy Research and Development; and 3. Become and Educational Leader in Sustainable Energy

Under the goal, Improve the Physical Environment, the campus goals are to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 30 percent by 2015, 45 percent by 2020, 55 percent by 2025, and 65 percent by 2030. Strategies include energy conservation at the central power plant and in buildings, implementing a smart growth strategy, implementing more aggressive building energy standards, fuel switching, green power purchases, implementing renewable technology, and utilizing carbon offsets."


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Buildings?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Buildings and the published plans in which each objective is included:

"The Energy Transition Plan was approved by the Michigan State University Board of Trustees in April 2012. The Plan has 3 goals - 1. Improve the Physical Environment; 2. Invest in Sustainable Energy Research and Development; and 3. Become and Educational Leader in Sustainable Energy

In addition, MSU has committed to the DOE Better Buildings Challenge which MSU is working toward a 20% reduction in energy demand (EUI) in 20 million square feet of built space by 2020. http://ipf.msu.edu/green/energy/building-efficiency/better-buildings-challenge.html

Energy policy - The heating, ventilation and cooling (HVAC) systems across campus are scheduled to run at specific times to attain occupant comfort while avoiding waste.

MSU tracks energy consumption in individual buildings. The university is reducing its energy consumption as part of its commitment to the Better Buildings Challenge, which can be read about on the Building efficiency page. The information below tells how the university regulates and monitors power usage.

Specific strategies in the plan related to buildings include: implement a smart growth strategy to minimize the amount of new square footage added to the campus, create a system that connects energy, space costs, and incentives to the end users, and implement more aggressive building energy standards.

See Campus Master Plan http://ipf.msu.edu/resources/campus-master-plan/index.html

http://ipf.msu.edu/green/energy/consumption.html"


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Energy?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Energy and the published plans in which each objective is included:

"The Energy Transition Plan was approved by the Michigan State University Board of Trustees in April 2012. The Plan has 3 goals - 1. Improve the Physical Environment; 2. Invest in Sustainable Energy Research and Development; and 3. Become and Educational Leader in Sustainable Energy.

MSU also has a Master Utility Plan for the campus which includes planning for power plant infrastructure, future of energy generation on campus, and meeting demand in a sustainable manner. This is a long range plan.

Under the goal, Improve the Physical Environment, the campus goals are to increase the campus' renewable energy to 15 percent by 2015, 20 percent by 2020, 25 percent by 2025, and 40 percent by 2030. Strategies include energy conservation at the central power plant and in buildings, implementing a smart growth strategy, implementing more aggressive building energy standards, fuel switching, green power purchases, implementing renewable technology, and utilizing carbon offsets."


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Food & Dining?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Food & Dining and the published plans in which each objective is included:

"Residential and Hospitality Services (RHS) includes operations of residence halls, dining facilities, food procurement, hotel, golf course, tennis, entertainment and other auxiliary services. RHS's sustainability visioning statement is, ""Ensuring MSU's long-term sustainability through innovative and balanced strategies that support stewardship, fiscal responsibility and partnership.""

RHS Strategic Plan includes a section on Sustainability and has recently added three imperatives for Residential Education to expand student engagement with sustainability in housing.

RHS lists strategies for energy conservation and water conservation, food wast reduction, sustainable procurement, material diversion, social responsibility, and connecting sustainability education and research.

The following is an excerpt from the RHS Sustainability Plan.

Food Waste Strategies
- Assist with closing the food loop and be cognizant of how food waste ties into energy
- Support efforts to reduce food waste, reduce food cost, review portion control, increase education and other tactics
- Review cost impacts of controlling food waste
- Implement and monitor trayless dining at Shaw and Yakeley; encourage trayless in other venues

Sustainable Procurement Strategies
- Increase local/regional purchasing strategies when fiscally able and available
- Know where our food and other products come from and how they are manufactured
- Track what our vendors do related to sustainability and recognize impacts, track and monitor
- Be knowledgeable of sustainable certifications and standards such as LEED, Forest Stewardship Council, Marine Stewardship, Certified Organic, Energy Star, Water Sense, etc. "


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Grounds?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Grounds and the published plans in which each objective is included:

Campus Master Plan - Land Use, Zoning, and Transportation Sustainability and the Tree Management Plan work interactively together. The Tree Management Plan sets the goals for increasing the percentage of the tree canopy throughout the university. The other key goal that is measured is 100 % of the waste from those trees that are removed are recycled, reused, and repurposed into the MSU Shadows program or utilized through the campus mulching program.

http://ipf.msu.edu/resources/campus-master-plan/index.html

Michigan State University is known for its beautiful campus. It is even one of the aspects touted on the president’s website. The Landscape Services department balances the university’s operational and aesthetic missions while using environmentally-friendly practices in grounds care and upkeep.

Trees are one of the most valuable natural energy-savers on campus. Shading reduces cooling costs. They act as windbreaks, which reduces heating costs. Trees also reduce heat islands that occur over hard surfaces in urban environments. Since trees are such a valuable resource, MSU takes special means to protect trees in construction areas and tailgate zones. In some instances, trees have been relocated to accommodate for a new building while preserving the tree. A technique called air spading allows the entire root system to be exposed without damage, the correct planting depth and root flare to be identified and the tree to continue to flourish after transplant.

Preventing “cowpaths,” protecting trees - Certain areas of the MSU campus are marked with infamous “cowpaths” of pedestrians that choose to take a shorter walk across green space than stick to installed sidewalks. Sidewalk placement follows these natural walking trails when possible. However, in areas with extensive tree root systems that weave underground, concrete cannot be used or the roots would be suffocated. As an alternate solution, rubber sidewalk was installed. The implementation was successful.

Academic mission - In the greenhouse near Bailey Hall, chefs that work for Residential and Hospitality Services grow herbs that are then used directly in campus cooking, reducing the costs and fuel use of transportation and packaging. Students intern within the greenhouse and work with the chef as part of their academic programs.

- Water conservation measurements and tracking of water use per operation

The university is committed to a comprehensive and continuous land use planning process with a framework that guides future decision making. The guiding principles are general principles, land use and facilities, environmental sustainability, open space, parking, circulation, and utility infrastructure. The university utilitizes several key plans that work interactively to preserve the campus for present and future uses. They are the Land Use Master Plan, the Tree Management Plan, the Stormwater Management Plan, the Construction Standards for new builds and major retrofits; and the Manual of Business Processes and outcomes are reported in division reports, I.e. IPF Annual report: http://ipf.msu.edu/_files/pdfs/reports/facilities-and-infrastructure-report-2015.pdf. Campus Beautification Plan: http://ipf.msu.edu/resources/facilities-infrastructure-reports/campus-beautification.html"

The land use management plan creates the overarching principles:

Arrange campus buildings, open space, circulation and utility systems to:

– establish positive interactions among academic, research, outreach, cultural, and operational activities;

– protect and strengthen the campus as a living-learning resource integral to the University’s mission;

– protect and enhance campus beauty;

– enhance environmental stewardship;

– minimize energy impacts and increase/retain energy efficiencies; and

– optimize safety and facilitate risk management.

The Campus Land Use Master Plan carries the campus into the next ten years of its land use cultivation and practices. In its measurable objectives for the campus, the plan states two key strategies for reducing its impact on the Red Cedar River: “First, the removal/relocation of Parking Ramp #2 (Auditorium Road) will convert a sizeable amount of land back to its function as floodplain. Second, the removal and relocation of approximately 1,000 surface parking spaces in the Central Academic District will remove an existing land use that has negative impacts both in terms of storm water quantity and quality.” In addition, the plan organizes the campus into logical districts of compatible land uses. Variances would have to be requested to implement uses outside of the zoning. Areas deemed sensitive to development are zoned under the University Zoning Ordinance. Among the metrics measured are - % green space preserved; actual variances requested and/or granted; and the continuation of protection of designated open spaces and % tree canopy.

A key principle is to implement development to encourage social interaction and vitality and to encourage collaboration with interdisciplinary connections. The central park area of campus was fitted with new, bright colored, outdoor furniture to encourage interaction. Then interactions and enjoyment were assessed through an experiential learning opportunity. This Plan is revised and republished every 6 years, and that timeframe is used as a framework in the strategies stated within the plan. The footprint of buildings is maintained for existing, demolition, and proposed building sq. ft. And the percent of utilization.

https://ipf.msu.edu/construction/campus-master-plan/land-use-recommendations. An example of how the master plan and construction measures are utilized in new building design is the Eli Broad College of Business sustainable building strategy with their pavillion construction. https://broad.msu.edu/news/pavilions-sustainable-building-strategy/. The college partnered with the MSU Shadows Program, which salvages trees that have been removed from campus from storm damage or construction to repurpose the trees, to create commemorative coasters for attendees of the groundbreaking ceremony.

Tree Canopy – Maintaining the tree diversity and woody plant diversity for the campus. As the nation’s pioneering Land Grant institution, MSU takes great pride in its landscape cultivation and conservation. The Campus Tree Management Plan states is strategy for holistic tree preservation, removal, and planting across the East Lansing campus. The Tree Plan works to maintain MSU’s high standards of a park-like campus and does so with its arborist and IPF teams. MSU’s efforts have manifested in the university receiving a Tree Campus USA designation. This means MSU has the required 5 annual standards: 1) A Campus Tree Advisory Committee; 2) A Campus Tree Care Plan; 3) An established Campus Tree Program with Dedicated Annual Expenditures; 4) Arbor Day Observance; and 5) A Service Learning Project. Through these standards, MSU maintains a pristine and well-nurtured campus that is in itself an arboretum. Below are MSU’s strategies for maintaining these efforts:

-Maintain maintenance cycle of 5 years for all trees within landscaped areas on campus.

-Develop a tree replacement policy for removals that do not conform to the tree removal guidelines; including but not limited to construction activities and tree ordinance violations.

-Negotiate an event parking plan with the MSU Police Department that protects trees from soil compaction and root injury.

See Attached “PA2-Transport, Campus EN, Grounds” for full report

Stormwater management practices are guided by the stormwater management plan that is implemented in concert with regional partners in a watershed approach. Stormwater management - Several landscaping solutions are used to manage stormwater runoff to naturally cleanse the water and to reduce the risk of flooding. This plan works in conjunction with the master plan and requires that campus land is served to provide future stormwater management to address storm water regulations

MSU’s construction standards are the tool that assures new buildings and major retrofits to buildings are done in a sustainable fashion. The standards contain active strategies for campus construction, including timeframe limits to work on campus; the amount of water consumption reduction required; the amount of energy efficiency to be incorporated; how construction waste will be recycled; stormwater management practices; and how trees and woody plants will be protected before, during, and after major construction projects. Contracted work and construction development are audited carefully by IPF https://ipf.msu.edu/sites/default/files/2018-08/CS_TEC_2004_011000_GENERAL_REQUIREMENTS.PDF


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Purchasing?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Purchasing and the published plans in which each objective is included:

MSU is the charter member that worked with the Michigan Food Council and the Food Bank of Michigan to develop the Michigan Good Food Charter. The MSU Center for Regional Food Systems manages the consortium for the Food Charter. There are 6 goals established to advance the vision by 2020. The university has committed to sources 20 % of their food from michigan growers, producers, and processors by 2020. further information on the charter and the consortiuem is https://canr.msu.edu/michiganfood/.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Transportation?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Transportation and the published plans in which each objective is included:

Transportation: A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address transportation and the published plans in which each objective is included. Response reference informal activities, plans, mission/vision statements, etc, rather than measurable objectives from formal, published plans.
MSU’s Surplus Store and Recycling Center (SSRC), operated through IPF, is responsible for waste hauling across campus. This solid waste fleet is part of the Recycling Center’s Strategic Plan, wherein the SSRC commits to transitioning this fleet to 100% renewable fuels by 2023 (https://msurecycling.com/strategic-plan/). This strategy ties into the campus Mobility Action Plan (MAP), which targets transportation across the East Lansing campus. This plan incorporates all aspects of campus mobility, including implementing to increase alternative transportation. The MAP committed to increasing public transportation, specifically the CATA public bus ridership, which has grown by 38 %, with nearly 85 % of students now making decisions of on-campus residence based on available transportation: http://www.adminsv.msu.edu/mobility/Mobility%20Report%20-%20final2.pdf
Since 2006, MSU’s partnership with CATA has involved discussion on incorporating electric busses into the transportation fleet. This idea has become a reality, with MSU’s pledge for more electric vehicles on campus and CATA’s addition of electric busses to its fleet. In 2016, CATA and MSU introduced seven new hybrid buses to the busses on campus: it has been estimated that these new busses help cut emissions by about 90 percent when compared to traditional models. The IPF campus fleet has pledged to reflect its electric vehicle percentage as above the national average (electric vehicle purchases in the U.S. are below 1%), and through its annual strategic plan it added 28 low-speed electric vehicles to its fleet, and in 2018 it was able to add four full-speed, highway legal vehicles to the 1,500 vehicles on the campus fleet.
Additionally, in 2014 MSU began plans to build a solar carport on campus. This carport plan spanned 5,000 parking spaces on south campus, with a 5% campus electricity contribution rate, and with a completion proposed for the end of the 2017 calendar year. This carport was completed in 2017 and went live in December of that year. In addition to the covered and lit 5,000 parking spaces, paved trails and additional bus stops were planned and added around the lots. These additions contribute to MSU’s mobility strategy and help the university to achieve its goals in the last mile traveled. Elaboration on such strategies can be found in the annual IPF reports under the Strategic Planning sections.
https://ipf.msu.edu/sites/default/files/2018-05/facilities-infrastructure-report-2015-16-compiled.pdf
https://ipf.msu.edu/sites/default/files/2018-05/facilities-infrastructure-report-2017.pdf
https://sustainability.msu.edu/discover/discover-T-cata-hybrids.html
In 2011, MSU’s IPF Division published a campus plan that laid out plans to expand upon its campus’s bike trails and carpooling. Bike trails were planned for installation along the entire Red Cedar River Trail by 2016, and a 3-year pilot car-share program was proposed through a partnership with Zipcar. In 2016, nearly 60% of the MSU River Trail (dedicated bicycle and pedestrian trail) hed been constructed from Harrison Road to Farm Lane, and today more than 68% of campus roads have bike lanes. The campus has six do-it-yourself fix-it stations in the residential neighborhoods and two secure bicycle storage facilities with fix-it stations (Grand River and Communication Arts Garages) and one secure storage facility within the FRIB complex. MSU completed its pilot three-year program with Zipcar, and a partnership was reached with the company, providing available Zipcars to student and faculty 24/7 on campus (see attached: “pdf Binder-Transport, Campus Eng”). The University has received the Silver Bicycle Friendly University Award from the League of American Bicyclists for its efforts.
Below are plans from the updated 2017 Campus Land Use Master Plan:
The following motorized projects and initiatives are anticipated in the near term (five- to ten-year planning horizon).
-Develop a comprehensive mobility plan that addresses the movement of people to, from, and around campus.
-Extend Wilson Road to Hagadorn Road with the goal of improving safety by reducing traffic within the East Residential District, relocating parking adjacent to Fee Hall, and providing a signalized intersection to aid pedestrians crossing Hagadorn Road.
-Remove Parking Ramp #2 when engineering analysis directs and restore the river floodplain. Address parking replacement consistent with the mobility plan (under development) and planning principles guiding more parking on the campus periphery.
The following non-motorized projects and initiatives are anticipated in the near term (five- to ten-year planning horizon).
Continue to design all roadways as complete streets in accordance with State of Michigan Public Acts 134 and 135 of 2010 wherein all roadways are to be planned and designed to meet the needs of all legal users.
-Continue to meet the needs of persons with disabilities working through the Accessibility Committee that includes IPF, FPSM, RCPD, RHS, and athletics.
-Continue bringing crosswalk pathway ramps up to ADA standards (e.g., maximum slopes, truncated domes).
-Provide infrastructure to support a suite of transportation options that discourage single-occupancy vehicle trips to, from, and around campus (e.g., CATA Clean Commute and Zipcar car-sharing programs) in alignment with the mobility plan.
-Fund and construct the final segments of the MSU River Trail.
-Enhance and expand bicycle parking within the academic and residential districts with a goal to accommodate 30% of the resident population.
https://ipf.msu.edu/sites/default/files/2019-04/Campus%20Land%20Use%20Master%20Plan.pdf


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Waste?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Waste and the published plans in which each objective is included:


Waste: The Response appears to mention measurable objectives but fails to cite the formal plan where they can be found.
The mission of MSU’s Recycling Operation is to develop, provide and nurture environmentally, socially and economically sustainable solid waste management solutions for Michigan State University and the local campus community.
MSU Recycling has implemented a 5 year plan to increase landfill diversion to 70% by 2024.
The Surplus Store and Recycling Center Waste Warrior Plan commits to these numbers through its strategic plan: https://msurecycling.com/waste-warriors/ and https://msurecycling.com/strategic-plan/
Current progress is being made in solid waste diversion, as the current milestone for 2014-15 is 63% landfill diversion, with a 60% diversion rate for construction solid waste (https://ipf.msu.edu/sites/default/files/2018-05/facilities-infrastructure-report-2015-16-compiled.pdf).
Construction waste management through IPF requires each project manager to develop a waste management plan that results in end-of-Project rates for salvage and recycling to be at least 50 or 75% by weight of total waste generated by the work. This commitment is in line with the design plan for IPF building construction; additional sustainability plan requirements for campus construction include: “Select and specify the use of materials with recycled content such that the sum of post-consumer plus one/half of the post-industrial content constitutes at least 20% of the total value of the materials in the project.” For further details on the plan, please see links below.
https://ipf.msu.edu/sites/default/files/2019-05/CS_DSG_DESIGN_GUIDELINES_-_GENERAL.pdf
https://ipf.msu.edu/construction/construction-standards/design-guidelines


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Water?:
No

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Water and the published plans in which each objective is included:

The Stormwater Management Plan can be viewed at: http://msu-water.msu.edu/managing-stormwater-on-the-msu-campus/

http://msu-water.msu.edu/msu-stormwater-management-program/

Wellhead Protection Plan - To protect our groundwater, which is the sole source of drinking water in the Greater Lansing area, MSU has developed a Wellhead Protection Program.http://www.orcbs.msu.edu/environ/programs_guidelines/wellhead/wh_01toc.htm

In addition to providing water for drinking, washing and irrigation needs, MSU takes stewardship a step further by also producing steam in the T.B. Simon Power Plant to make electricity and to heat and cool the campus infrastructure. To learn more about the water plant process, visit the Process page.

Infrastructure Planning and Facilities partners with other MSU organizations to ensure the safest and smartest water use possible. Visit the Protection page to learn about how MSU works to keep water sources clean. Visit the Conservation page to see how campus seeks to reduce water waste. http://ipf.msu.edu/green/water/conservation.html

Water monitoring is performed regularly. MSU’s water meets or exceeds all State of Michigan and EPA standards. Our most recent water quality report details specific information about the water on campus. http://ipf.msu.edu/green/water/water-quality-report/index.html

MSU Water Quality Report http://ipf.msu.edu/green/water/water-quality-report/index.html

MSU Sustainability Report http://sustainability.msu.edu/report/2014

IPF Water Distribution Report http://ipf.msu.edu/green/water/process.html

MSU has extensive stormwater management plans for its campus and the regional area surrounding it. Strategies and Plans for these management practices are constantly changing and evolving as MSU expands its infrastructure to accommodate its growing student, staff, and faculty populations. Infrastructure Planning and Facilities is the sole provider for all of campus’s water needs. Drawing groundwater from the Saginaw Aquifer, a deep sandstone formation that lies beneath much of central Michigan’s Lower Peninsula, the university treats the water to distribute to campus. IPF's water plans incorporate conservation, protection, stormwater run off, quality, distribution, and sustainability of water. MSU’s Stormwater Management Plan outlines its strategies for improving stormwater Infrastructure on campus. The Stormwater Committee oversees compliance with MSU’s Michigan MS4 General Watershed Permit. The goal of the Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4) program is to reduce the discharge of pollutants to surface waters of the state. The Stormwater Management Plan encompasses this effort, aligning short and long-term commitments with the goals outlined in the Management Plan. This Plan (linked with the Campus Master Plan) was published in 2012 and stretches to 2020, upon installation of the new filtration plant in that year (see below).

http://msu-water.msu.edu/what-is-storm-water/managing-storm-water-on-the-msu-campus/

Each type of stormwater management practice and each new adjustment or addition on campus has a catered strategic plan that every individual involved in the process must adhere to. All stormwater design on campus must account for 10, 25, and 100 year flood, along with 2 year, 24 hour rainfall events.

file:///C:/Users/spearsm1/Downloads/CS_DSG_DESIGN_GUIDELINES_-_STORMWATER.PDF

MSU is currently working towards improving campus water quality, and this effort began with an infrastructure strategy in 2016. MSU has committed to building a 6 million gallon per day water filter plant (11,500 gross-square-feet) with a 2 million gallon elevated storage, and it has pledged to complete this project by July of 2020. The strategy to improve campus water will result in improvement of certain low levels of contamination found in the 2017 campus water quality study. The project budget consists of $21 million from general funds, including $2.1 million contingency, approved by the Board of Trustees in February of 2018.

https://ipf.msu.edu/sites/default/files/2019-04/MSU_Water_Report_6_26_2018.pdf

Water Consumption: for water rhs plan has some water goals; also we have the water reduction requirements for new buildings and major retrofits per the construction standards.  

https://ipf.msu.edu/construction/construction-standards/design-guidelines  arcitechtual design sustainability; buildings leed silver; design requirements; ASHRE 90 is minimum for energy conservation in buildings design.  construction waste management requires Develop waste management plan that results in end-of-Project rates for salvage/recycling of 50 (75) percent by weight of total waste generated by the Work.


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Diversity & Affordability?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Diversity & Affordability and the published plans in which each objective is included:

In 2015, MSU’s President and its Office of Inclusion and Intercultural Initiatives installed a number of programs, responsive units, and initiatives to increase diversity and affordability at MSU. In 2015, MSU pledged to “[eliminate] barriers that stand in equity’s way” at MSU, and by doing so increase graduate rate, diversity of undergraduate, graduate, faculty, and staff at MSU. Several of such efforts were already being worked toward on campus, but in 2015 the University recognized the need increase its efforts, and work to make this pledge a reality began. In 2018, while there is always work to be done and progress to be made, the university can claim progress in all of these areas. Compared to data from 2010, in spring of 2018 the graduation rate increased for most underrepresented groups: “The largest increase is among African American/Black students who saw an 11-percentage point increase. The probation rate for all first-time undergraduate students in the fall 2018 entering cohort is 6.7 percent, which is a decline of 1.8 percentage points from the fall 2010 first-time undergraduate entering cohort.” (MSU Diversity and Inclusion Report, 2018).
By 2018, MSU pledged to have a Counseling and Psychiatric Services program available to students 24/7/365, and such a program now exists for call, in-person, and by-texting counseling for students. MSU Pledged to initiate and open an Office of Title IV and Civil Rights by 2018, which opened its doors in the beginning of the 2018 spring semester. Between April of 2018 and December 2018, more than 30,000 students. Faculty, and staff received sexual misconduct prevention training. In 2017 The University pledged to establish a workgroup to target this area and create improvements on campus for the MSU community; this workgroup, since named the Prevention and Outreach Education workgroup, has grown to include a director, associate director and six prevention specialists, each with an area of expertise: “Since its creation, the department has created new opportunities for awareness and dialogue across campus through:
- Expanding faculty and staff training, collaboration and outreach around topics such as understanding the RVSM policy, navigating disclosures and supporting survivors.
- Creating new training to better meet the needs of student-athletes and staff.
- Developing outreach and education for graduate students.
- Updating student orientation materials to place emphasis on self-empowerment, RVSM training requirements and awareness of support services.
- Developing individualized plans to help departments address culture climate issues.
- Enhancing the ‘Greeks Take the Lead’ fraternity and sorority RVSM prevention program.”
MSU’s College of Engineering has included diversity in its strategic plan. Within its plan, Engineering “commits to increasing the percentage of underrepresented minority (URM) and women engineers by five (5) percentage points during the period of this plan [2016-2021]. This will result in an increase of URM students from 8% to 13% and women from 20% to 25%. Particular attention will be paid to increasing URM and women percentage of the graduate student population by 5% as well.” For a comprehensive look at further plans and strategies for the College of Engineering, please see attached: “ Coll. Engineering 2016-21 Plan”
In regards to relationship violence and bias reporting, in 2016 97% of MSU’s student body took online relationship violence and sexual misconduct training. In 2015, MSU hired an outside firm to conduct a report on the university, investigating diversity, bias incident reporting, sexual misconduct and harassment awareness. In 2017 this report was published, which spurred the responses of the university to pledge further support for underrepresented groups through further resources for offices such as the LGBTQ center and the Office of Inclusion and Intercultural Initiatives.
In the fall of 2016, the Residence Education and Housing Services implemented the Residential Learning model within the residence halls. Key learning outcomes have been identified to support our missions of creating an inclusive living environment. Outcomes from this program will include: “By living in our residence halls, Spartans will explore others’ identities and by living in our residence halls, Spartans will communicate effectively across difference. By living in our residence halls, Spartans will intervene appropriately in instances of bias and by living in our residence halls, Spartans will create positive social change.” In 2016 RHS Employment partnered with the Spartan Project SEARCH, a program that provides Ingham Intermediate School District students with developmental and intellectual disabilities internship opportunities on-campus. It was pledged that ten students would receive support to increase job skills in different areas on campus, and this program has proved successful, with more students supported every year.
In MSU’s Infrastructure and Planning Facilities (IPF), the division measures and buildings progress in areas of diversity and affordability by expanding its K-12 Outreach Efforts, its Skilled Trades Apprenticeship Program Development initiative and its Partnership with Women in Skilled Trades Program, which pledged to graduate its first set of women in 2018 (achieving this goal by July of that year).
https://aan.msu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Leading-with-Purpose-Courage-and-Vision.pdf
https://ipf.msu.edu/about/news/women-skilled-trades

Additional notes:
https://msutoday.msu.edu/news/2017/msu-report-details-relationship-violence-sexual-misconduct-complaints/
https://msutoday.msu.edu/news/2018/sexual-misconduct-prevention-office-makes-big-impact-in-short-time/
https://msutoday.msu.edu/news/2018/msu-hires-firm-to-help-promptly-investigate-reports-of-sexual-assault-harassment/
http://www.inclusion.msu.edu/about/annual-report/2014-15%20Annual%20Diversity%20Report.pdf
http://www.inclusion.msu.edu/about/annual-report/2015-16%20%20Annual%20Diversity%20Report%20Data.pdf
http://www.inclusion.msu.edu/about/annual-report/2017-18%20Diversity%20at%20MSU%20Student%20and%20Workforce%20Report-FINAL-Accessible.pdf

Additionally, MSU takes Affordability seriously. The office of Financial Aid provides many resources to help students plan for their college commitment. The Office of Financial Aid provides access, aid, and advisory services for the MSU Community to facilitate student recruitment, enrollment, and retention at Michigan State University. This is just one piece of the counseling and resources provided. https://finaid.msu.edu/affordability.asp
Office of Financial Aid measures and assesses student enrollment, retention, academic success, cost of education over lifetime, etc.
Office of the Provost - University Innovation Alliance - a consortium of MSU and ten other major public research institutions, working together to ensure that more low-income and first-generation students are supported in their efforts to earn a college
https://provost.msu.edu/archive/2014/Enhancing-student-success-closing-the-graduation-gap.html"


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Investment & Finance?:
No

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Investment & Finance and the published plans in which each objective is included:

Unknown


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Wellbeing & Work?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Wellbeing & Work and the published plans in which each objective is included:

"In acheiving a culture of high-performance and excellence, Michigan State University is moving forward with an aggressive plan to create a Healthier Campus. This action report represents an initial effort by an ad hoc task force to sift through the seemingly infinite goals and activities that will move MSU toward this goal and establish a first set of recommended specific actions. The committee acknowledges that this initial prioritization will not create a perfectly Healthy Campus Environment. However, we feel the implementation of these action items will significantly move the needle, a lofty accomplishment in itself.
The Healthy Campus Team began its charge by identifying overarching outcomes to be addressed through implementation of specific activities to move MSU toward becoming a healthier campus for students, faculty and staff. These overarching goals include: (1) Improve health status metrics, (2) Address safety on campus, (3) Create a climate of health engagement/activity, (4) Increase student retention and graduation rates, (5) Incorporate health as a strategic corporate-level goal, (6) Decrease overall healthcare expenditures by MSU, and (7) Address work-life balance.
https://provost.msu.edu/documents/TeamHealthyCampus.pdf

Measuring outcomes of plan: Michigan State University’s Board of Trustees has approved a tobacco-free ordinance, a move that will go into effect Aug. 15, 2016
http://tobaccofree.msu.edu"


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address other areas (e.g. arts and culture or technology)?:
No

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address other areas and the published plans in which each objective is included:

N/A


Does the institution have a formal statement in support of sustainability endorsed by its governing body (e.g. a mission statement that specifically includes sustainability and is endorsed by the Board of Trustees)? :
---

The formal statement in support of sustainability:
---

The institution’s definition of sustainability (e.g. as included in a published statement or plan):
---

Is the institution an endorser or signatory of the following? :
Yes or No
The Earth Charter ---
The Higher Education Sustainability Initiative (HESI) ---
ISCN-GULF Sustainable Campus Charter ---
Second Nature’s Carbon Commitment (formerly known as the ACUPCC), Resilience Commitment, and/or integrated Climate Commitment ---
The Talloires Declaration (TD) ---
UN Global Compact ---
Other multi-dimensional sustainability commitments (please specify below) ---

A brief description of the institution’s formal sustainability commitments, including the specific initiatives selected above:
---

The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
---

Additional documentation to support the submission:

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.