Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 68.96
Liaison Adam Sizemore
Submission Date March 1, 2019
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

Miami University
OP-3: Building Operations and Maintenance

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.00 / 5.00 Adam Sizemore
Director of Sustainability
Physical Facilities Department
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Total floor area of building space:
8192308 Square Feet

Floor area of building space that is certified at each level under a green building rating system for the operations and maintenance of existing buildings used by an Established Green Building Council:
Certified Floor Area
LEED O+M Platinum or the highest achievable level under another GBC rating system 0 Square Feet
LEED O+M Gold or the 2nd highest level under another 4- or 5-tier GBC rating system 0 Square Feet
Certified at mid-level under a 3- or 5-tier GBC rating system (e.g. BREEAM-In Use, CASBEE for Existing Buildings, DGNB, Green Star Performance) 0 Square Feet
LEED O+M Silver or at a step above minimum level under another 4 -or 5–tier GBC rating system 0 Square Feet
LEED O+M Certified or certified at minimum level under another GBC rating system 0 Square Feet

Floor area of building space that is certified under a non-GBC rating system for the operations and maintenance of existing buildings, e.g. BOMA BESt, Green Globes CIEB:
0 Square Feet

Percentage of building space certified under a green building rating system for the operations and maintenance of existing buildings:
0

A brief description of the green building rating system(s) used and/or a list or sample of certified buildings and ratings:

NA


Of the institution's uncertified building space, what percentage of floor area is maintained in accordance with a published indoor air quality (IAQ) management policy or protocol? (0-100):
100

A copy of the IAQ management policy or protocol:
The website URL where the IAQ policy/protocol may be found:
---

Of the institution's uncertified building space, what percentage of floor area is maintained in accordance with a published green cleaning policy, program or contract ? (0-100):
100

A copy or the green cleaning policy:
---

A brief description of how green cleaning is incorporated into cleaning contracts:

Green Cleaning Policy: Miami University

Purpose
Miami University is committed to maintaining a high standard of cleanliness in its facility as well as promoting indoor air quality and sustainability by implementing a thorough green cleaning program. We accomplish this level of commitment by incorporating sustainably certified chemicals and equipment and utilizing proper custodial training and procedures. We are determined to provide healthy high-performance cleaning and a more productive indoor environment with fewer burdens to our natural resources.

The standards outlined here are intended to reduce the exposure of staff and visitors to chemical, biological, and particulate matter that may be harmful to human health, and the built and natural environments.

The cleaning procedure is tailored towards protecting vulnerable building occupants, such as occupants with asthma, other respiratory conditions, or sensitive or damaged skin; dust, dirt, and other contaminants will be removed and irritating or possible harmful chemicals will only be used minimally. The timing of the cleaning practices will be tailored to when there will be less building occupants such as after normal occupancy hours.

Our overall cleaning standards are designed to fulfill LEED criteria. Other sources for our standards are Green Seal (GS) and the Carpet and Rug Institute (CRI). The green chemicals and tools selected under this standard are for routine cleaning. Where more aggressive cleaning of a non-routine nature is required, chemicals that do not meet this standard may occasionally be used. Examples of chemicals in this latter category are floor finishes containing metal, strippers containing ammonia, red stain removers, metal polish, and ceramic tile cleaners. This approach complies with Green Seal GS37 and LEED 2009 EBOM IEQ Credit 3.

All of the standards and guidelines set forth in the Green Cleaning Policy will be upheld by all management staff and custodial staff. This policy takes effect upon occupancy of the facility and will continue indefinitely

Program Maintenance and Implementation:
Miami University Green Cleaning Standards is a written document establishing how green cleaning standards are to be used, managed, and evaluated. The Miami University staff will maintain the Standards. The Miami University staff will also review and update the standards as necessary. The building managers will be responsible for initiation, communication and compliance verification.

Green Cleaning Training:
A training program has been created for cleaning supervisors and staff, who are responsible for implementing green cleaning procedures on a daily basis. The training program is to ensure staff understands the environmental and health issues associated with cleaning products and equipment, as well as their specific responsibilities for application and adherence of the policy. The curriculum covers the hazards, use, maintenance, and proper disposal of cleaning chemicals, and dispensing equipment and packaging. This program also includes strategies for promoting and improving hand hygiene, including both hand washing and the use of alcohol-based waterless hand sanitizers. The training is conducted annually or as requested by supervisor. The Miami University staff is responsible for updating the training program, and program delivery and compliance. Documentation of training is kept by the Miami University staff.
Basic principles of green cleaning procedures will include, but will not be limited to, the following items. Training on green cleaning procedures, equipment, and products will take place before the first day of working or on the first day of employment.

•Entryways: Trapping and removing dirt and pollutants before they enter the building. Frequent cleaning of entrances and floor mats.
•Indoor Air Quality: procedures for minimizing particles of dust and chemicals in the air. Application of chemicals to the cloth rather than spraying the surface to be cleaned.
•Proper use of the chemical management systems for accurate dilutions to maximize cleaning efficiency and minimize waste.
•HEPA filter bags: empty the equipment at the end of shifts or when they are half-full.
•Proper vacuuming, extraction, rinsing, and drying of carpet.
•Focus on cleaning touch points such as doorknobs, handles, bright work, fixtures and any other common areas in the building where occupants come in contact.
•Proper application of disinfectant in restrooms by following the proper dwell time for the chemical to work on the surface. Disinfect or remove any spot while using less product.
•Use of micro-fiber cleaning tools
•Color-coded tools to ensure that pollutants do not get carried from one area to another.
•Preventing cross-contamination by using the proper micro-fiber cloth codes:
•Yellow micro-fiber cloth for sinks
•Green micro-fiber cloth for general purposes
•Blue micro-fiber cloth for glass surfaces
•Red micro-fiber cloth for bathrooms
•Preventing cross-contamination by using the proper mop pad codes:
•Light Blue micro-fiber pads for general use
•Light Blue outlined in Green micro-fiber pads for chalkboards
•Light Blue outlined in Red for bathroom floors

Staffing Models
A staffing model for the facility along with detailed cleaning schedules (including entryways) and tasks will be maintained.

Inspections
A plan for conducting routine monthly inspections to evaluate the effectiveness of the cleaning program, using the Association of Physical Plant Administrators (APPA) standards as a guide, is in place. The target standard is APPA level 2 (see description below). Managers and/or supervisors will conduct routine monthly inspections and maintain records of inspection results and the corrective actions are taken. A corrective plan is in place for any areas that fall below the target level of cleanliness.

APPA Levels of Cleaning
Level 1 – Orderly

•Floors and base moldings shine and/or are bright and clean; colors are fresh. There is no buildup in corners or along walls.
•All vertical and horizontal surfaces have a freshly cleaned or polished appearance and have no accumulation of dust, dirt, marks, streaks, smudges or fingerprints.
•Washroom and shower tile and fixtures gleam and are odor free. Supplies are adequate.
•Trash containers and pencil sharpeners are empty, clean and odor-free.

Level 2 –Ordinary

•Floors and base moldings shine and/or are bright and clean. There is no buildup in corners or along walls, but there can be up to two days' worth of dirt, dust, stains or streaks.
•All vertical and horizontal surfaces are clean, but marks, dust, smudges, and fingerprints are noticeable with close observation.
•Washroom and shower tile and fixtures gleam and are odor free. Supplies are adequate.
•Trash containers and pencil sharpeners are empty, clean and odor-free.

Level 3 – Casual

•Floors are swept clean, but upon observation dust, dirt and stains, as well as a buildup of dirt, dust and/or floor finish in corners and along walls, can be seen.
•There are dull spots and/or matted carpet in walking lanes and streaks and splashes on base molding.
•All vertical and horizontal surfaces have obvious dust, dirt, marks, smudges, and fingerprints.
•Lamps all work and all fixtures are clean.
•Trash containers and pencil sharpeners are empty, clean and odor-free.

Level 4 – Moderate

•Floors are swept clean but are dull. Colors are dingy and there is an obvious buildup of dust, dirt and/or floor finish in corners and along walls. Moldings are dull and show streaks and splashes.
•All vertical and horizontal surfaces have conspicuous dust, dirt, smudges, fingerprints, and marks that will be difficult to remove.
•Less than 5 percent of lamps are burned out and fixtures are dingy.
•Trash containers and pencil sharpeners have old trash and shavings. They are stained and marked. Trash cans smell sour.

Level 5 - Unkempt Neglect

•Floors and carpets are dirty and have visible wear and/or pitting. Colors are faded and dingy and there is a conspicuous buildup of dirt, dust and/or floor finish in corners and along walls. Base moldings are dirty, stained and streaked. Gum, stains, dirt, dust balls and trash are broadcast.
•All vertical and horizontal surfaces have major accumulations of dust, dirt, smudges, and fingerprints, as well as damage. It is evident that no maintenance or cleaning is done on these surfaces.
•More than 5 percent of lamps are burned out and fixtures are dirty with dust balls and flies.
•Trash containers and pencil sharpeners overflow. They are stained and marked. Trash containers smell sour.

Feedback Plan
Miami University encourages building management, occupants and cleaning staff to develop open lines of communication in order to ensure the success of the green cleaning program. Staff and visitors can request services using the online Facilities work order system. Customer service surveys are conducted periodically to gauge the effectiveness of the program. In addition, comments and concerns can be directed to the Miami University staff at any time. Communicating with building occupants is vital in reaching the goal of a healthy indoor environment. Documentation of all communication with building occupants will be maintained by Miami University’s TMA system.

Safe Handling and Storage
Custodians receive training and information on the Hazard Communication Program. The extent of the information will be dependent on their work environment and chemicals that they may encounter. The hazard communication training will be provided by Miami University staff or the manufacturing representative. Documentation is kept for the chemical type, volume, and concentration used in each cleaning process.

Custodians are required to put on the necessary personal protective equipment (PPE) whenever using cleaning chemicals. Custodians are trained in the safe handling of chemicals, including a review of the Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for each chemical. The training includes instructions to not mix different chemicals and first-aid actions to take in event of accidental chemical contact with skin or eyes.

Custodians are instructed to report accidents and spills immediately. All accidents are documented and investigated. Custodians are also required to inform their supervisor of any adverse reactions to using chemicals.

Chemicals are stored in dedicated storage rooms and custodial closets away from heat, sunlight, and foodstuffs. All containers and spray bottles are clearly labeled. The transfer or storage of cleaning chemicals in unmarked containers, food containers or drink containers is prohibited.
Training and education provided to employees and others will be documented with detailed records maintained by the location and copy of all training records on file in the location’s office.

Disposal and Recycling of Cleaning Chemicals
All employees are to be trained in being knowledgeable in the hazards, use, maintenance, disposal and recycling of cleaning chemicals, dispensing equipment and packaging. Upon implementation of this Green Cleaning Policy, all previous cleaning products that do not meet the standards of this plan will be phased out and disposed of in the appropriate way.

Hand Hygiene
Focus on preventative measures. The janitorial staff should wash their hands as many times as is necessary, and also keep equipment clean and well maintained. Building occupants are encouraged to maintain hand hygiene through hand washing and the use of alcohol-based waterless hand sanitizers.

Standard Operating Procedures
For a more in-depth explanation of standard operating procedures, please see the Miami University Building Services Employee Manual.

General Cleaning
General Cleaning of all surfaces have performed a minimum of once per week. Restrooms and other public areas are cleaned daily.

•Microfiber, lint-free dusting cloths are preferred instead of cotton cloths.
•Use designated color cloths for different spaces, for example, for restrooms.
•Soiled cloths are to be placed in a container to be laundered.

Dust Mopping
The dust mopping of floors and stairwells has performed a minimum of once per week.

A micro-fiber flat mop is preferred over a dry or chemically treated cotton mop.

Vacuuming
Vacuuming of floors has performed a minimum of once per week.

•CRI’s Green Label Program and HEPA filters are recommended for vacuums.
•Vacuum bags should be checked periodically and changed when they are 2/3 to 3/4 full.

Entryway Maintenance
Entryway Maintenance has performed a minimum of once per week.

•Sweep or vacuum entry and matting (daily).
•Damp mop entryway. This reduces the potential for moisture to lead to bacterial and fungal growth when floor mats get wet.

Floor Care
All floors are swept, dust mopped, wet mopped or auto-scrubbed a minimum of once per week.

Resilient Tile Floors
When wear paths begin to develop in the finish on resilient tile floors, the floor is “top scrubbed” removing a layer of finish, dirt, and debris. The floor is then recoated using an uncertified (zinc-based) floor finish. All resilient tile floors are maintained with five coats of floor finish.

When floors cannot be restored using the top scrubbing method, a complete stripping of all wax finish is performed using a non-certified (ammonia) based finish remover. A minimum of five coats of finish is then applied.

Non-Resilient Tile Floors:
For all non-resilient tile floors (Terrazzo & Marble), a protectant is applied every few years and is never stripped. Maintenance of this tile will be conducted with diamond pads for polishing and honing.

Carpet Care:
Carpets are deep cleaned once a year using sustainable powered carpet cleaning equipment certified by the Carpet & Rug Institute (CRI). Interim carpet cleaning is scheduled to address the needs of high traffic areas. Carpets are pre-sprayed before cleaning as needed.

Laboratories:
Laboratories must be swept and spot mopped daily. Trash containers and boxes containing discarded glass must also be disposed of daily. Dusting and spot cleaning of non-research areas should be conducted as determined by the building supervisor.

Counters where chemicals or experiments are located, sinks, fume hoods, and autoclaves should not be cleaned.

Vulnerable Occupants:
The cleaning procedure is designed to protect vulnerable building occupants, such as occupants with asthma, other respiratory conditions, or sensitive or damaged skin. All of the practices described above are designed to quickly and efficiently minimize dust, debris, and other airborne or surface-borne contaminants in each occupied space so as to minimize the impact on vulnerable occupants. Additionally, this plan outlines the series of standards that each cleaning product and chemical must meet to be used in the facility. These standards are the current industry-recognized standards and represent the chemicals and materials least likely to cause issues for occupants and employees, vulnerable or otherwise. Finally, per the methods described within this policy, these chemicals shall be used minimally wherever possible to further reduce the impact on occupants and employees

Powered Equipment Standards:
Miami University recommends that at least 40% of all the cleaning equipment (purchased, leased, or used by contractors) must require the following standards. A phase-out plan will be encouraged to replace equipment that does not meet the criteria at the end of its life. University staff is encouraged to keep an inventory of equipment including a maintenance log for each item.

•All powered equipment must have the following features: safeguards, such as rollers or rubber bumpers, to avoid damage to building surfaces; ergonomic design to minimize vibration, noise, and user fatigue, as reported in the user manual in accordance with ISO 5349-1 for arm vibrations, ISO 2631–1 for vibration to the whole body, and ISO 11201 for sound pressure at operator’s ear; and as applicable, environmentally preferable batteries (e.g., gel, absorbent glass mat, lithium-ion) except in applications requiring deep discharge and heavy loads where performance or battery life is reduced by the use of sealed batteries.
•Vacuum cleaners must be certified by the Carpet and Rug Institute Seal of Approval/Green Label Vacuum Program and operate with a maximum sound level of 70 dBA or less in accordance with ISO 11201.
•Carpet extraction equipment, for restorative deep cleaning, must be certified by the Carpet and Rug Institute's Seal of Approval Deep Cleaning Extractors and Seal of Approval Deep Cleaning Systems program.
•Powered floor maintenance equipment must have vacuums, guards, or other devices for capturing fine particles, and must operate with a maximum level of 70 dBA, in accordance with ISO 11201
•Propane-powered floor equipment must have high-efficiency, low-emissions engines with catalytic converters and mufflers that meet the California Air Resources Board or EPA standards for the specific engine size and operate with a sound level of 90 dBA or less, in accordance with ISO 11201.
•Automated scrubbing machines must be equipped with variable-speed feed pumps and either (1) on-board chemical metering to optimize the use of cleaning fluids or (2) dilution control systems for chemical refilling. Alternatively, scrubbing machines may use tap water only, with no added cleaning products.

Innovation
New environmentally friendly products are evaluated as they are introduced to the market. We understand that the cleaning industry frequently makes advances in technology, and we plan to incorporate these advances as they become available. New products must meet the respective standards listed as they apply to each product category. In the event that a required product does not meet these standards or a standard has not yet been identified, we will look for the product that most closely complies with the standards outlined above and will continue to use the product as needed until an environmentally-preferable product is available.


Of the institution's uncertified building space, what percentage of floor area is maintained in accordance with an energy management or benchmarking program? (0-100):
100

A brief description of the energy management or benchmarking program:

Miami University has sub-metered all its buildings for energy use. We monitor electric, steam, heating hot water, chilled water, natural gas, city water, and sewer. Each building's usage is then imported into a software package that archives this data on a monthly basis and has rules set up to flag any anomaly in usage per utility on a month over month and year over year. An exception report is generated and conveyed to stakeholders. We also then generate a rolling 12-month kbtu/gsf for each building on campus which is then rolled up into a campuswide kbtu/gsf. Campuswide performance goals are set for kbtu/gsf and tracked monthly. We archive the usage of every building utility and have a record that goes back 7 years now. Measurement and verification of energy conservation measure implemented are then reviewed and quantified to assess their effectiveness.


Of the institution's uncertified building space, what percentage of floor area is maintained in accordance with a water management or benchmarking program? (0-100):
100

A brief description of the water management or benchmarking program:

Miami uses a program called, Utility Manager Pro. We import the monthly water usage from the City of Oxford into Utility Manager Pro. We can run different reports that will show historically what any building will use over a given time period.


The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
---

Additional documentation to support the submission:
---

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.