Overall Rating Bronze
Overall Score 31.69
Liaison Sally Hopley
Submission Date Aug. 30, 2021

STARS v2.2

Metropolitan Community College
OP-9: Landscape Management

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 0.71 / 2.00 Sally Hopley
Coordinator of Sustainable Practices
Campus Planning and Sustainability
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Total campus area:
197.22 Acres

Figures required to calculate the total area of managed grounds:
Area (double-counting is not allowed)
Area managed organically, without the use of inorganic fertilizers and chemical pesticides, fungicides and herbicides 1.10 Acres
Area managed in accordance with an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program that uses selected chemicals only when needed 138.50 Acres
Area managed using conventional, chemical-based landscape management practices 57.59 Acres
Total area of managed grounds 197.19 Acres

A brief description of any land excluded from the area of managed grounds:

n/a


Percentage of grounds managed organically:
0.56

A brief description of the organic landscape management program:

Our Horticulture/Land Systems management program has eliminated the use of inorganic fertilizers and chemical pesticides in favor of ecologically preferable materials as a learning tool to our students on our small, on-campus farm/garden (1 acre)
The Fort Omaha Campus, Applied Technology Center, Elkhorn Valley Campus, and Fremont Area Center are managed by MCC staff, while turf areas at the South Omaha Campus and Sarpy Center are managed by contractors. MCC already has several landscape management best practices in place for the campuses managed by MCC staff, including:
• Using drought and heat resistant fescue for turf that requires less water and maintenance
• Applying insecticides, fungicides, and herbicides only as needed
• Using rain-sensitive irrigation controls on the Fort campus
• Spot spraying and hand pulling weeds as needed instead of blanket spraying pesticides
• Installing several bioswales on FOC to help manage stormwater
• Leaving grass clippings on the lawn while mowing to reduce moisture loss and waste
• Composting yard waste on FOC and Elkhorn
On our Fort campus, we apply compost, utilize cover crops and rotate plant families to increase the organic matter content in our soils and decrease our dependence on exterior inputs.


Percentage of grounds managed in accordance with an IPM program:
70.24

A copy of the IPM plan or program:
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A brief description of the IPM program:

• Using drought and heat resistant fescue for turf that requires less water and maintenance
• Applying insecticides, fungicides and herbicides only as needed
• Using rain-sensitive irrigation controls on the Fort campus
• Spot spraying and hand pulling weeds as needed instead of blanket spraying pesticides
• Installing several bioswales on FOC to help manage storm water
• Leaving grass clippings on the lawn while mowing to reduce moisture loss and waste

MCC is also a part of the Nebraska statewide Arboretum site: https://www.mccneb.edu/Academics/Programs-of-Study/Culinary-Hospitality-and-Horticulture/Horticulture-Land-Systems-and-Management


A brief description of the institution's approach to plant stewardship:

MCC currently cares for our plants by performing appropriate care and maintenance including pruning. In landscape design decisions, MCC looks to use native and ecologically well-adapted non-invasive plants.
On the Fort campus, we trial different varieties of native species in our perennial garden to show students plants that have evolved in our climate and highlight ones that do well in our landscape areas.


A brief description of the institution's approach to hydrology and water use:

The Fort campus (80 acres) uses weather-sensitive irrigation controls. The Fort campus also features two bio-retention gardens.


A brief description of the institution's approach to landscape materials management and waste minimization:

MCC collects yard waste from the largest campus, Fort, and sends it to be mulched. Our Horticulture area uses the industrial compost collection for their garden and floral class materials. On the second-largest campus, Elkhorn, yard waste is collected and composted onsite. The


A brief description of the institution's approach to energy-efficient landscape design:

N/A


A brief description of other sustainable landscape management practices employed by the institution:

A 20x25 foot pollinator garden was recently installed with specific host plants for monarchs. In landscape design decisions, MCC looks to use native and ecologically well-adapted non-invasive plants. We also plant over 200 new trees a year, to either replace or expand our existing tree canopy.


Website URL where information about the institution’s sustainable landscape management program is available:
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Additional documentation to support the submission:
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Information comes from our Horticulture and Facilities departments.

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.