Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 76.63
Liaison Karen Oberer
Submission Date Dec. 11, 2020

STARS v2.2

McGill University
PA-7: Support for Underrepresented Groups

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 3.00 / 3.00
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have a publicly posted non-discrimination statement? :
Yes

The non-discrimination statement, including the website URL where the policy is publicly accessible:

From the Policy on Harassment and Discrimination Prohibited by Law:

"Statement of Principle:

"McGill University is committed to excellence in teaching, learning, and research and to fostering a community founded upon the fundamental dignity and worth of all of its members. The University recognizesthat such excellence can only flourish in an equitable environment in which all members of the University, at all levels, regardless of the nature of their work or area of study are free from Harassment and Discrimination Prohibited by Law. The University is also committed to maintaining an office the mandate of which includes the education of, and the dissemination of information to, members of the University community concerning such matters as harassment, discrimination, and equity.

"Each Member of the University Community shares responsibility for respecting the dignity of, and giving fair treatment to, all members of the University community. Moreover, each person is responsible for promoting and maintaining an equitable environment free from Harassment and Discrimination Prohibited by Law, as
defined in Section 2, below.

"Particular onus is placed on those in positions of academic and administrative authority: to be aware of what constitutes Harassment and Discrimination Prohibited by Law and what procedures are in place to provide information and to address complaints; and to implement and use appropriate and active management practices consistent with the achievement of the goals of this Policy.

"Acts of Harassment and Discrimination Prohibited by Law are University offences subject to disciplinary measures."

https://www.mcgill.ca/secretariat/files/secretariat/policy_on_harassment_and_discrimination.pdf


Does the institution have a discrimination response protocol or committee (sometimes called a bias response team)?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s discrimination response protocol or team:

The Senior Equity & Inclusion Advisor (SEIA) oversees the integration of equity work at the University — such as programming, resource development, and the intake of complaints — under the guidance of McGill’s Policy on Harassment and Discrimination Prohibited by Law. Reporting to the Associate Provost (Equity and Academic Policies), the SEIA’s mandate is to proactively educate and raise awareness about equity within the University community in order to advance McGill’s responsibility to prevent Harassment and Discrimination Prohibited by Law.

The SEIA serves as the intake person for any member of the University community — including students, faculty or staff — who wishes to file a complaint of harassment or discrimination under the Policy. When individuals reach out to the SEIA's office, they are referred to resources available through the University, including support services. Student support services are listed here: https://www.mcgill.ca/how-to-report/additional-support/students. Staff support services are listed here: https://www.mcgill.ca/how-to-report/additional-support/staff

The SEIA oversees and supports the Assessors, who are members of the University community that carry out investigations under the Policy and submit a report of results and recommendations to the Provost.

McGill also employs a Special Investigator (Sexual Violence), who is charged with investigating all reports of sexual violence on campus.

The protocol for handling complaints under the Policy on Harassment and Discrimination Prohibited by Law is outlined in section 5 of the policy:
https://www.mcgill.ca/secretariat/files/secretariat/policy_on_harassment_and_discrimination.pdf


Does the institution have programs specifically designed to recruit students from underrepresented groups?:
Yes

Does the institution have programs specifically designed to recruit academic staff from underrepresented groups?:
Yes

Does the institution have programs designed specifically to recruit non-academic staff from underrepresented groups?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s programs to recruit students, academic staff, and/or non-academic staff from underrepresented groups:

The McGill Admissions office maintains a specific protocol for Indigenous students applying to the university. All First Nations, Inuit, and Métis applicants are asked to identify themselves on their application form and to submit a personal statement, as well as letters of recommendation and a resumé. This allows admissions decision-makers to use McGill's Indigenous admission evaluation process and take into consideration the educational experiences particular to members of an Indigenous community that are not evaluated through the University's standard practices. This process also allows the university to provide additional service and information to applicants about support services and funding opportunities for Indigenous students at McGill.
https://www.mcgill.ca/indigenous/students/admissions

The Faculty of Engineering is also currently implementing initiatives and protocols which seek to increase the number of qualified Indigenous students gaining admission to, and excelling in, all programs within the faculty. It is the aim of these initiatives to take into consideration the educational experiences particular to members of Indigenous communities that are otherwise not evaluated through the University's standard practices. In collaboration with the First Peoples’ House, the Faculty of Engineering encourages prospective Indigenous undergraduate students to self-declare their Indigenous identity when completing their application for admission. This will provide students with access to enhanced services, job and career postings, scholarships, awards and bursaries, and social and cultural events.

The Faculty of Medicine welcomes applications from First Nations, Inuit and Métis applicants and has a specific application pathway for First Nations and Inuit students who are residents of Quebec. In addition Indigenous applicants may also be eligible for the RSPP (Rural and Small Populations Pathway) if they attended high school in a small community. The Faculty also has an outreach program, the Indigenous Health Professions Program, which facilitates outreach visits and programs for youth, and supports prospective Indigenous applicants to all health professions programs at McGill.
Source: https://www.mcgill.ca/medadmissions/applying/categories/roq/indigenous

With regards to staff and faculty recruitment, there is an Employment Equity Oversight Committee (EEOC) the mandate of which is
- To monitor progress towards meeting the goals/objectives outlined in McGill’s Employment Equity Plan
- Annually run and review the equity statistics to monitor progress in closing gaps or to identify new or increasing gaps in representation.
- Review new or changing policies and procedures related to hiring/recruitment, retention, training and development to ensure new barriers are not introduced oversight committees
The EEOC includes three subcommittees, one for each employment group: the Academic Equity Sub-Committee, which represents faculty members, research staff, and academic senior administrators; the Administrative and Support Equity Sub-Committee, which represents management staff, executives, and unionized support staff; and the Trades and Services Equity Sub-Committee, which represents trades and services staff, including casuals.
Source: https://www.mcgill.ca/equity/employment-equity/oversight-committees

McGill requires that all hiring committee chairs and members participate in equity training and all faculty are encouraged to take part. Hiring committees must ensure that at least one shortlisted candidate is a member of a designated equity group.
Source: https://www.mcgill.ca/equity/employment-equity/human-resources-information/guidelines-academic-recruitment

Moreover, in 2018 McGill developed a Canada Research Chairs EDI Action Plan, which addresses four categories of measures to enhance EDI efforts at McGill that are directly connected with our institution’s engagement with the CRC Programs: EDI Objectives and Measurement Strategies; the Management of CRC Allocations; EDI Data Collection, Analysis, and Use; and Ensuring a Healthy EDI Culture with a View to Retention, Success, and Inclusion. See here for more details:
Source: https://www.mcgill.ca/apo/files/apo/crc_edi_plan_2018_tips_20181215-final_4_0.pdf


Does the institution have mentoring, counseling, peer support, academic support, or other programs designed specifically to support students from underrepresented groups on campus?:
Yes

Does the institution have mentoring, counseling, peer support or other programs designed specifically to support academic staff from underrepresented groups on campus?:
Yes

Does the institution have mentoring, counseling, peer support or other programs to support non-academic staff from underrepresented groups on campus?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s programs designed specifically to support students, academic staff, and/or non-academic staff from underrepresented groups:

McGill's First Peoples' House offers academic, community, cultural, and campus support for indigenous students. Its mission is "to provide First Nations, Inuit and Métis students attending McGill with a 'home away from home', where they can find support and encouragement to succeed in their studies and remain connected to their culture."
The goals of the First Peoples' House are:
- To help increase the admission and retention rates of Indigenous students studying at McGill.
- To promote and increase the accessibility of Student Services at McGill to Indigenous students.
- To meet the concerns of Indigenous communities which include educational programming and policies which are culturally relevant to Indigenous peoples.
- To raise awareness within the McGill University community regarding the past, present, and future aspirations of Indigenous peoples through the promotion of activities that encourage personal, social, intellectual, and cultural interactions between Indigenous and McGill students and staff.
- Collaborate and engage with the McGill, local and national First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities to support Indigenous student issues.
- To ensure and enhance the continuity and prosperity of First Peoples House services
Source: https://www.mcgill.ca/fph/welcome/our-mission

Cousins, the Indigenous Student Mentorship Program
This program is designed to connect First Nations, Inuit, and Métis students who are unfamiliar with First Peoples' House and its services with Indigenous students at McGill who are more involved and acquainted with the House's resources and events. Established students provide guidance and support to current students in connecting with on and off-campus communities and assist newer students in navigating their first year at the university and in the city.
Source: https://www.mcgill.ca/fph/current-students/cousins-indigenous-student-mentorship-program

The Accessibility Advisor in the Office of the Provost organizes community building and networking events for staff and faculty with Disabilities. The Employment Equity Advisor and the Equity Education Advisor organizes gatherings for Black and Indigenous staff, faculty and students. The Equity Education Advisor and the Queer Subcommitee of the Joint Board Senate organizes montly events for Trans and Non-binary students staff and faculty.
Source: https://www.mcgill.ca/equity/about/equity-advisors

Family Care
The Family Resources Coordinator
- brings together solutions to family care issues on campus through consultation with the community and planning
- responds to questions about childcare, bringing family to Canada, housing, or anything else related to family responsibilities
- provides one-on-one meetings for support and solutions
- conducts orientation events and workshops throughout the year
Source: https://www.mcgill.ca/familycare/


Does the institution have training and development programs, teaching fellowships and/or other programs that specifically aim to support and prepare students from underrepresented groups for careers as faculty members?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s programs to support and prepare students from underrepresented groups for careers as faculty members:

Financial, and/or other support programs for doctoral and post-doctoral students from underrepresented groups:

McGill Law is committed to supporting Indigenous students and welcomes dialogue with interested prospective Master of Laws (LLM) and Doctor of Civil Law (DCL) applicants. First Nations, Inuit, and Métis persons are strongly encouraged to apply to the Faculty of Law, and are invited to self-identify on their uApply application form. Self-identification allows McGill to inform students about specific services and funding opportunities and to assess its progress in the recruitment and retention of Indigenous students. Self-identification is used not only in the recruitment process, put also for the purpose of assessing student services and supporting the ongoing retention of Indigenous students.

Indigenous research opportunities:
The Faculty is host to a vibrant Aboriginal Law Students’ Association and the Centre for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism’s Aboriginal Human Rights Initiatives (see https://www.mcgill.ca/humanrights/research/indigenous-human-rights-initiatives)

Financial support:
In addition to our numerous sources of financial support, the Faculty of Law now offers funding packages to admitted Inuit, First Nations, and Métis students.
DCL students will receive $10,000/year in additional funding for three years; LLM students will receive a funding package of $10,000 for one year.
Indigenous students may also be eligible for other sources of financial support (see https://www.mcgill.ca/fph/scholarships-and-bursaries-0).
Source: https://www.mcgill.ca/law/grad-studies/admissions-guide/indigenous-applicants

McGill's Indigenous Bursary with Indspire:
This is an award ranging from $1,000- $10,000 based on demonstrated financial need, available to Indigenous students (including Masters and Ph.D. students) pursuing a degree program. Students may re-apply to Indspire in each year of study.
Source: https://www.mcgill.ca/fph/scholarships-and-bursaries-0


Does the institution produce a publicly accessible inventory of gender-neutral bathrooms on campus?:
Yes

Does the institution offer housing options to accommodate the special needs of transgender and transitioning students?:
Yes

Website URL where information about the institution’s support for underrepresented groups is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.