Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 72.63
Liaison Kathleen Ng
Submission Date Aug. 22, 2016
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

McGill University
PA-2: Sustainability Planning

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 3.50 / 4.00
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have a published strategic plan or equivalent guiding document that includes sustainability at a high level? :
Yes

A brief description of how the institution’s strategic plan or equivalent guiding document addresses sustainability:

The Vision 2020 process through which this strategy was developed has been led by McGill’s Office of Sustainability (MOOS) and funded by the Sustainability Projects Fund. The process was guided by a multi-stakeholder steering committee and supported by a core project team. The contents of the Sustainability Strategy, however, come from the McGill community. Beginning February 2012, over one thousand McGill community members contributed their visions and action ideas to this process through more than twenty public events, dozens of presentations, and online. Students, staff, and faculty were engaged in countless conversations, world-cafe style discussions, flash consultations, one-on-one interviews and working groups to imagine and plan for a more sustainable McGill. The engagement process neither intended to nor succeeded in reflecting every voice in the McGill community, but care was taken to talk with and listen to a diverse cross-section of McGill stakeholders. This strategy emerged from those conversations, which have been distilled into one vision, 23 goals, and 14 priority actions for sustainability at McGill. Many other action ideas were discussed over the course of Vision 2020, and it is expected that these will inform the development of the next iteration of the Sustainability Strategy (2016-2018). It is important to note that many actions not currently reflected in the Strategy will also be pursued over the coming years. A groundswell of sustainability projects is currently underway, with students, staff, and faculty actively working together on every scale to foster positive changes at the University. Continuing to connect with, support, and learn from these individuals and groups will be crucial to the development of sustainability at McGill.


A copy of the strategic plan:
The website URL where the strategic plan is publicly available:
Does the institution have a published sustainability plan (apart from what is reported above)? :
No

A copy of the sustainability plan:
---

The website URL where the sustainability plan is publicly available:
---

Does the institution have a published climate action plan (apart from what is reported above)? :
No

A copy of the climate action plan:
---

The website URL where the climate action plan is publicly available:
---

Does the institution have other published plans that address sustainability or include measurable sustainability objectives (e.g. campus master plan, physical campus plan, diversity plan, human resources plan)? :
Yes

A list of other published plans that address sustainability, including public website URLs (if available):
Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Curriculum?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Curriculum and the published plans in which each objective is included:

VISION2020 ACTION 4: APPLIED STUDENT RESEARCH
Identify and facilitate opportunities for applied student research that advances sustainability.

Applied student research (ASR) has played an important role in measurably improving McGill’s
sustainability performance in recent years while also providing real-world learning experiences to
students. Student-led efforts to coordinate ASR opportunities – including the McGill Food Systems
Project, the McGill Energy Project, the McGill Waste Project, and the McGill Spaces Project (the
MXPs) - have demonstrated the win-win potential of this kind of research. Scaling up and supporting
sustainability-related ASR will build on recent efforts to catalogue and publicize ASR opportunities
through a Living Lab database of projects as well as a wiki-style website. This process will also be
supported by and in turn catalyze the ongoing work of the emerging multi-stakeholder network on
Community-Engaged and Experiential Learning & Research (CEELR Network), which has already
investigated ASR models at peer universities. The Office of the Vice-Principal, Research and International
Relations will provide guidance on McGill’s research expertise to the CEELR Network.
Finally, this action will facilitate opportunities to earn points toward the AASHE Sustainability Tracking,
Assessment, and Rating System (STARS).

DELIVERABLES FOR 2014-2016
• The Living Lab database (of ASR project reports) and Living Lab wiki website (of potential ASR
projects, faculty supervisors, and courses) will be populated and communicated;
• Opportunities to increase the number of faculty and staff supervisors for ASR projects will be
explored;
• Training and communication support for sustainability ASR groups at McGill will be provided;
• Networking events will be hosted to make ASR more visible and to connect efforts;
• A common brand for ASR activities will be developed and used;
• The establishment of a new course code – cross-listed in every faculty – will be explored, to
make ASR opportunities more accessible.

PARTNERS
Student Services; Teaching and Learning Services; Social Equity and Diversity Education Office;
McGill Office of Sustainability; Office of the Vice-Principal Research and International Relations;
McGill Energy Project; McGill Waste Project

VISION2020 ACTION 5: FACULTY FELLOWS IN SUSTAINABILITY
Develop a program in which small groups of faculty members are identified each year as Faculty
Fellows in Sustainability.

Following the directive of McGill’s Sustainability Policy (2010) to “foster inquiry into sustainability
through teaching, research and the university experience” this action will serve as a voluntary
means to support faculty members who are interested in integrating sustainability into their courses.
Through the establishment of a Faculty Fellows in Sustainability program, this action will put in
place structures to connect and support small groups of faculty members from the same or related
disciplines to work together as they explore how best to do so. Recognizing that the McGill Office of
Sustainability and Teaching & Learning Services have already researched models at other universities
to this end, the project will continue to take an inquiry-based approach and place a focus on
peer learning. As successive cohorts of Faculty Fellows in Sustainability complete their experience,
the network of faculty members with this expertise and perspective will strengthen and grow. This
action will also help McGill earn points toward the AASHE Sustainability Tracking, Assessment, and
Rating System (STARS).

DELIVERABLES FOR 2014-2016
• Funding to support the development of the Faculty Fellows in Sustainability program will be
sought through the Sustainability Projects Fund;
• A working group co-chaired by Teaching & Learning Services and the McGill Office of
Sustainability will develop a project plan that includes evaluation and communication strategies;
• The working group will select two groups of faculty members with whom to work as the pilot
cohort of the Faculty Fellows in Sustainability;
• The initial cohort(s) will complete and evaluate their experiences as Faculty Fellows in
Sustainability and provide recommendations for program development.

PARTNERS
Teaching & Learning Services; McGill Office of Sustainability

Source: Vision2020 Sustainability Strategy (2014-2016) Priority Action Briefs
Link: https://www.mcgill.ca/sustainability/files/sustainability/vision_2020_priority_action_briefs.pdf


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Research?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Research and the published plans in which each objective is included:

VISION2020 ACTION 1: DEFINING SUSTAINABILITY RESEARCH
Through a consultative process, develop a working definition of “sustainability research” and map
the presence of such research at McGill.

Research that explores or pursues a flourishing future for humans and ecosystems often focuses
on relationships among the three pillars of sustainability: environment, society, and economy. Yet
while many researchers are engaged in sustainability-related work at McGill, and while sustainability
is one of the core commitments of McGill’s Strategic Research Plan (2013), the University lacks
a clear, agreed-upon definition of exactly what sustainability research is and how it is carried out.
Mobilizing the Research Advisory Council to develop an academically rigorous definition of sustainable
research is not only an important starting point for more connected efforts here at McGill, but
is also needed to keep pace with other universities. In addition, a definition will help McGill to track
sustainability research in the future.

DELIVERABLES FOR 2014-2016
• A working group will be convened by the Research Advisory Council;
• A review of peer universities’ definitions of sustainability research will be conducted;
• A definition of sustainability research at McGill will be developed by the working group in
consultation with the McGill research community, including centers, schools, and institutes;
• The definition will be endorsed by the Research Advisory Council, chaired by the Vice-Principal
Research and International Relations;
• Sustainability will be included in academic tracking systems developed at McGill.

PARTNERS
Office of the Vice-Principal Research and International Relations; Office of the Provost

VISION ACTION 2: COLLABORATIVE SUSTAINABILITY RESEARCH
Develop a networking platform to facilitate collaborative sustainability research.

The research needed to successfully tackle the complex sustainability challenges of the 21st
century is often multi-, inter-, or trans-disciplinary. While there is a precedent for events that gather
researchers at McGill, some of which have been around sustainability, there is an opportunity
to expand and develop a platform to facilitate collaborative sustainability research in the coming
years. A platform that allows researchers to cluster around sustainability challenges or questions,
and potentially apply for collaborative research grants, will advance one of the core commitments
of McGill’s Strategic Research Plan (2013) and align with best practices at peer universities. Here
at McGill this platform could include seminars, workshops, seed funding, applied student research,
events, and lectures.

DELIVERABLES FOR 2014-2016
• A forum for exchange between sustainability researchers from different disciplines will be
provided;
• Opportunities will be explored to establish a seed fund for the development or piloting of jointsustainability research grant applications;
• Opportunities will be provided for applied student research projects or extra-curricular research
projects on sustainability;
• Championship and support will be provided for student-led initiatives, such as the McGill Sustain
ability Research Symposium;
• A series of public lectures and policy panels featuring speakers from within and beyond McGill
will be held.

PARTNERS
McGill School of Environment; Marcel Desautels Institute for Integrated Management; Trottier Institute
for Sustainability in Engineering and Design; Office of the Vice-Principal Research and International
Relations

VISION2020 ACTION 3: SUSTAINABLE LABS
Develop and implement a Sustainable Labs program aiming to foster sustainability in labs.

Sustainability in research includes not only what we research but how we research it. In order to
fulfill directives of McGill’s Sustainability Policy (2010) – including minimization of resource use, a
lifecycle approach to activities, and accessibility – this project will embed sustainability considerations
into the already-existing network of groups working to improve lab processes. This network
includes the University Lab Safety Committee and its 40 reporting departmental committees, a collaborative
effort led by Environmental Health and Safety in partnership with a number of committed
professors and several administrative offices. Leveraging active student involvement through the
McGill Waste Project and the McGill Energy Project, as well as the work of pilot projects like Green
Biobanking, Mercury-Free Microscopy, and the Shut Your Sash fume hood efficiency initiative, the
Sustainable Labs program will expand and institutionalize best practices in the field. In the future,
the scope will ideally expand from wet labs to all labs.

DELIVERABLES FOR 2014-2016
• Best practices research on sustainable labs programs will be completed;
• Initial recommendations for the structure and content of a McGill Sustainable Labs program will
be made;
• A group of key stakeholders will meet regularly to develop the program;
• The Sustainable Labs program will be implemented and integrated with McGill’s existing system
for lab safety and monitoring.

PARTNERS
Environmental Health & Safety; Office of the Vice-Principal Research and International Relations;
University Lab Safety Committee; Office for Students with Disabilities; McGill Office of Sustainability;
McGill Energy Project; McGill Waste Project

Source: Vision2020 Sustainability Strategy (2014-2016) Priority Action Briefs
Link: https://www.mcgill.ca/sustainability/files/sustainability/vision_2020_priority_action_briefs.pdf


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Campus Engagement?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Campus Engagement and the published plans in which each objective is included:

VISION 2020 ACTION 6: CAMPUS HUBS
Renovate underused indoor and outdoor spaces on campus to transform them into community
gathering spaces.

A dynamic intellectual community, founded on interdisciplinary collaboration, is the first principle
identified in McGill’s Master Plan Principles Report (2008). A strong community fabric also plays
an important role in supporting a culture of sustainability. In discussing opportunities to foster a
culture of sustainability at McGill, community members repeatedly identified a desire for more informal
places to relax, connect and explore ideas together. As a response to this, this action aims to
foster interaction, creativity, and connection through well-designed physical spaces. Building on the
success of projects such as the Edible Campus, which transformed the Burnside Terrace, and the
redevelopment of the square in front of the James Administration Building, this action will ensure
that landscape design plans are completed for the three main campus entrances (Milton Gates,
Roddick Gates, McTavish) as well as the Y-intersection. This action will also bring key stakeholders
together around the common goal of improving underutilized indoor and outdoor spaces at McGill.
Inspired by “placemaking” trends in urban planning and community revitalization - yet keeping
in mind constraints of budget, physical infrastructure, and climate – stakeholders will focus on
creative modifications to physical spaces that can be accomplished with modest investments of
budget and time. Campus and Space Planning will play a key role in implementing this action, as
will the student-led McGill Spaces Project, Student Housing and Hospitality Services, and faculty partners in the Schools of Architecture and Urban Planning.

DELIVERABLES FOR 2014-2016
• Landscape design concept studies will be completed for the three main campus entrances
(Milton, Roddick, McTavish) and associated campus roads, as well as the Y-intersection;
• The McGill Spaces Project will include representation from a wide variety of key stakeholders,
will meet regularly, and will coordinate opportunities for applied student research on topics
related to the redesign of campus spaces;
• A prioritized list of underused indoor and outdoor spaces will be developed;
• Funding will be sought from a variety of sources for creative, small-scale, “placemaking”
pilot projects based on the prioritized list.
• Reviews of food service locations will be completed with the goal of improving the student
experience in and around these locations.

PARTNERS
Campus and Space Planning; Student Housing and Hospitality Services; McGill Spaces Project

VISION2020 ACTION 7: SUSTAINABLE MCTAVISH
Collaborate with the City of Montreal and other partners to redevelop McTavish Street into a pedestrian-
friendly corridor that showcases best practices in sustainable urban planning and serves
as a center of community activity.

Guided by its Master Plan Principles Report (2008) and in partnership with the City of Montreal,
McGill chose to pedestrianize lower campus, including lower McTavish Street, in 2010. This was
followed by attempts to create a more welcoming and connecting environment by adding planters,
benches, etc. Currently, the City of Montreal has plans to change the water supply pipes on lower
McTavish, and has also identified McTavish Street as one of several promenades urbaines—pedestrian
corridors to be rejuvenated in celebration of the 375th anniversary of Montreal. This work,
scheduled to be completed by the end of 2015, presents an exciting opportunity to undertake a
more ambitious and innovative redevelopment of this area of campus. By working closely with the
City of Montreal to ensure that the plan for McTavish Street incorporates McGill’s priorities, the University
will ensure that the corridor is welcoming to pedestrians, serves as a center for community
activity, and incorporates best practices in sustainable urban planning and design.

DELIVERABLES FOR 2014-2016
• McGill representatives will participate in all City of Montreal working groups related to McTavish
Street redevelopment;
• McGill will work with the City of Montreal on its plan for the redevelopment of upper and
lower McTavish Street, in an effort to ensure that McGill’s priorities and the campus context
are reflected in the plan.

PARTNERS
Facilities, Operations and Development; Campus and Space Planning;
McGill Office of Sustainability

Source: Vision2020 Sustainability Strategy (2014-2016) Priority Action Briefs
Link: https://www.mcgill.ca/sustainability/files/sustainability/vision_2020_priority_action_briefs.pdf


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Public Engagement?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Public Engagement and the published plans in which each objective is included:

VISION2020 ACTION 6: CAMPUS HUBS
Renovate underused indoor and outdoor spaces on campus to transform them into community gathering spaces.

A dynamic intellectual community, founded on interdisciplinary collaboration, is the first principle
identified in McGill’s Master Plan Principles Report (2008). A strong community fabric also plays
an important role in supporting a culture of sustainability. In discussing opportunities to foster a
culture of sustainability at McGill, community members repeatedly identified a desire for more informal
places to relax, connect and explore ideas together. As a response to this, this action aims to
foster interaction, creativity, and connection through well-designed physical spaces. Building on the
success of projects such as the Edible Campus, which transformed the Burnside Terrace, and the
redevelopment of the square in front of the James Administration Building, this action will ensure
that landscape design plans are completed for the three main campus entrances (Milton Gates,
Roddick Gates, McTavish) as well as the Y-intersection. This action will also bring key stakeholders
together around the common goal of improving underutilized indoor and outdoor spaces at McGill.
Inspired by “placemaking” trends in urban planning and community revitalization - yet keeping
in mind constraints of budget, physical infrastructure, and climate – stakeholders will focus on
creative modifications to physical spaces that can be accomplished with modest investments of
budget and time. Campus and Space Planning will play a key role in implementing this action, as
will the student-led McGill Spaces Project, Student Housing and Hospitality Services, and facultypartners in the Schools of Architecture and Urban Planning.

DELIVERABLES FOR 2014-2016
• Landscape design concept studies will be completed for the three main campus entrances
(Milton, Roddick, McTavish) and associated campus roads, as well as the Y-intersection;
• The McGill Spaces Project will include representation from a wide variety of key stakeholders,
will meet regularly, and will coordinate opportunities for applied student research on topics
related to the redesign of campus spaces;
• A prioritized list of underused indoor and outdoor spaces will be developed;
• Funding will be sought from a variety of sources for creative, small-scale, “placemaking”
pilot projects based on the prioritized list.
• Reviews of food service locations will be completed with the goal of improving the student
experience in and around these locations.

PARTNERS
Campus and Space Planning; Student Housing and Hospitality Services; McGill Spaces Project

VISION2020 ACTION 7: SUSTAINABLE MCTAVISH
Collaborate with the City of Montreal and other partners to redevelop McTavish Street into a pedestrian-
friendly corridor that showcases best practices in sustainable urban planning and serves
as a center of community activity.

Guided by its Master Plan Principles Report (2008) and in partnership with the City of Montreal,
McGill chose to pedestrianize lower campus, including lower McTavish Street, in 2010. This was
followed by attempts to create a more welcoming and connecting environment by adding planters,
benches, etc. Currently, the City of Montreal has plans to change the water supply pipes on lower
McTavish, and has also identified McTavish Street as one of several promenades urbaines—pedestrian
corridors to be rejuvenated in celebration of the 375th anniversary of Montreal. This work,
scheduled to be completed by the end of 2015, presents an exciting opportunity to undertake a
more ambitious and innovative redevelopment of this area of campus. By working closely with the
City of Montreal to ensure that the plan for McTavish Street incorporates McGill’s priorities, the University
will ensure that the corridor is welcoming to pedestrians, serves as a center for community
activity, and incorporates best practices in sustainable urban planning and design.

DELIVERABLES FOR 2014-2016
• McGill representatives will participate in all City of Montreal working groups related to McTavish
Street redevelopment;
• McGill will work with the City of Montreal on its plan for the redevelopment of upper and
lower McTavish Street, in an effort to ensure that McGill’s priorities and the campus context
are reflected in the plan.

PARTNERS
Facilities, Operations and Development; Campus and Space Planning;
McGill Office of Sustainability

Source: Vision2020 Sustainability Strategy (2014-2016) Priority Action Briefs
Link: https://www.mcgill.ca/sustainability/files/sustainability/vision_2020_priority_action_briefs.pdf


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Air & Climate?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Air & Climate and the published plans in which each objective is included:

VISION 2020 ACTION 11: ENERGY & CLIMATE
Develop an energy action plan.

Long-standing efforts to reduce the size of its energy footprint have earned McGill recognition for its commitment to energy efficiency and emissions reduction. The development of a comprehensive
Energy Action Plan, in alignment with the McGill’s Environment Policy (2001) and Sustainability
Policy (2010), will further establish the University as a leader in campus sustainability, particularly in
areas of energy and climate action. Building on work led by the Utilities & Energy Management team
in collaboration with institutional partners (such as Procurement Services and the Trottier Institute
for Sustainable Engineering and Design (TISED)), as well as applied student research groups like
the McGill Energy Project, University Services will systematically explore opportunities to measure,
communicate, and further reduce McGill’s absolute greenhouse gas emissions in the coming years.

DELIVERABLES FOR 2014-2016
• Using the framework provided by McGill’s Five-Year Energy Management Plan, the energy
use and natural resource consumption of the building portfolio will be monitored and managed
toward continuous improvement;
• McGill’s strategies for reducing greenhouse gas emissions will be quantitatively and
qualitatively benchmarked against those of peer universities; lessons learned from this
benchmarking will iteratively shape McGill’s climate action strategies;
• McGill’s greenhouse gas emissions will be tracked and communicated;
• The carbon footprint of university-related travel will be tracked and reported to the community;
• University stakeholders will be engaged in consultation and collaboration towards the
development of a comprehensive Energy Action Plan;
• The Energy Action Plan will be communicated to the McGill community and the implementation
of its recommendations will begin.

PARTNERS
Utilities & Energy Management; Procurement Services; McGill Energy Project

Source: Vision2020 Sustainability Strategy (2014-2016) Priority Action Briefs
Link: https://www.mcgill.ca/sustainability/files/sustainability/vision_2020_priority_action_briefs.pdf


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Buildings?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Buildings and the published plans in which each objective is included:

VISION2020 ACTION 8: GREEN BUILDING
Adopt McGill green building standards that incorporate the LEED credit system and aim to achieve
at least LEED Silver for all major construction and renovation projects.

The built space of any campus can directly reflect a university’s approach to sustainability. In McGill’s
Sustainability Policy (2010), a commitment to “meet or exceed in our operations governmental
standards of sustainability for educational institutions and the norms of sustainability achieved by
our comparator universities” is advanced. Though McGill’s historic infrastructure poses challenges
for sustainable design and building, one building (Life Sciences Complex, 2012) has already
achieved LEED Gold certification, and an informal goal of meeting LEED Silver standards for renovation
has been maintained. Recently, representatives from several units within University Services
have discussed the formalization of green building standards that will guide all of McGill’s future
renovation and construction projects. This action will see those standards finalized, adopted, and
implemented.

DELIVERABLES FOR 2014-2016
• Green building standards that incorporate the LEED credit system and aim to achieve at
least LEED Silver for all major construction and renovation projects will be adopted by
University Services;
• These standards will be implemented to guide all renovation and construction projects
undertaken at McGill and incorporated into contracts with those doing business with the
University.
PARTNERS
Office of the Associate Vice-Principal, University Services; Facilities, Operations and Development;
McGill Office of Sustainability

Source: Vision2020 Sustainability Strategy (2014-2016) Priority Action Briefs
Link: https://www.mcgill.ca/sustainability/files/sustainability/vision_2020_priority_action_briefs.pdf


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Energy?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Energy and the published plans in which each objective is included:

VISION 2020 ACTION 11 Deliverables for 2014-201
Using the framework provided by McGill’s Five-Year Energy Management Plan, the energy use and natural resource consumption of the building portfolio will be monitored and managed toward continuous improvement;
McGill’s strategies for reducing greenhouse gas emissions will be quantitatively and qualitatively benchmarked against those of peer universities; lessons learned from this benchmarking will iteratively shape McGill’s climate action strategies;
McGill’s greenhouse gas emissions will be tracked and communicated;
The carbon footprint of university-related travel will be tracked and reported to the community;
University stakeholders will be engaged in consultation and collaboration towards the development of a comprehensive Energy Action Plan;
The Energy Action Plan will be communicated to the McGill community and the implementation of its recommendations will begin.

Source: Vision2020 Sustainability Strategy (2014-2016) Priority Action Briefs
Link: https://www.mcgill.ca/sustainability/files/sustainability/vision_2020_priority_action_briefs.pdf

MCGILL'S 5 YEAR ENERGY PLAN - OBJECTIVES & PROJECTS
-Lighting Retrofit Program. Two buildings have successfully been retrofitted and seven more are under way. Savings
demonstrated with the first two buildings are convincing and the performance of the occupancy detection
sensors has been proven. At the end of the program, 39 buildings will have been retrofitted.

- Energy Audits and Re-Commissioning Program. Both programs are intertwined and many of the tasks
required to conduct an energy audit are also required in building re-commissioning.Building re-commissioning will focus on easy to implement projects with short paybacks (typically less than three years) while building audits will address projects with longer paybacks and that require heavier capital investment.

- Energy Management Information System (EMIS). The installation of meters was completed in 2010-
2011. Close to 400 meters now monitor all the energy flows in more than 67 buildings on the downtown
and Macdonald campuses. McGill launched its online energy dashboard in April 2011. A taskforce was
set up comprising staff from Utilities & Energy Management, Building Operations, and other ad-hoc
guests to pinpoint issues as they occur, take action to correct these issues, and make recommendations to
improve the energy performance of McGill’s downtown buildings. This taskforce is essential to
maintaining savings achieved through the different energy conservation measures implemented in
campus.

- Campus-Wide Programs. Arising from the first wave of energy audits, these programs aim to address
issues encountered in several buildings across campus that would be better dealt with on a systemic
approach. Five areas of intervention have been identified: Maintenance, Insulation, Optimization,
Building Upgrades, and Innovation.

- Other Energy Conservation Projects. The Otto-Maass retrofit and the McLennan – Redpath Library HVAC
Upgrade, the New Summer Boiler, and Burnside Hall Heat Recovery Project outlined in the 2010 Energy
Management Plan are completed. The Macdonald Campus Energy Project is its design phase. Other
projects are proposed in the current report to complement this list.

- Other Measures not Included in the First EMP. While the Energy Management Plan covers hard
measures, such as lighting retrofits, ventilation system upgrades, or building re-commissioning, Utilities &
Energy Management also developed a range of soft measures such as the introduction of energy
efficiency standards in all construction and renovation projects or the collaboration of Utilities & Energy
Management experts on major deferred maintenance projects and other initiatives on campus.

Link: http://www.mcgill.ca/facilities/files/facilities/emp_2013_update.pdf


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Food & Dining?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Food & Dining and the published plans in which each objective is included:

MCGILL FOOD AND DINING SERVICES STRATEGIC PLAN
The Strategic Plan includes objectives and strategies including (but not limited to) metrics on energy and water use, waste and compost, (minimizing) price increases, number of student research initiatives, and external rankings of McGill food services for the 2014-2017 timeframe.

Goals and Objectives for 2013-2017
1) Full Cycle Sustainability
Putting additional emphasis and energy into decreasing McGill Food Service’s full-cycle sustainability, by critically and thoroughly examining all aspects of MFDS practices and exploring feasible solutions to improve these practices.
2) Sustainable Business Model
Managing increasing amounts of sustainable and ethical purchasing within a sustainable business model.
3) Education & Student Applied Research
Support Student Applied Research Projects & acting as a “Living Laboratory” for McGill’s academic community.
4) Leadership
Continuing to act as a leader in sustainability at McGill and in Montreal, by taking direct sustainable actions, and encouraging and advising other groups to do the same
5) Unit Teamwork & Trust
Strengthening SHHS’s teamwork and trust through employee engagement, consultation and involvement, as well as strengthening exterior partnerships integral to sustainable improvements.

Source: Appetite for Sustainability: MFDS 2014-2017 Plan
Link: https://www.mcgill.ca/foodservices/files/foodservices/appetite_for_sustainability_-_2014-2017_2.pdf


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Grounds?:
No

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Grounds and the published plans in which each objective is included:

N/A


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Purchasing?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Purchasing and the published plans in which each objective is included:

VISION 2020 ACTION 9 Deliverables for 2014-2016
Procurement Services Staff and buyers, as well as other administrative members of the University involved with purchasing activities, will be trained to incorporate life-cycle thinking and triple bottom line criteria (social, economic, environmental) into their day-to-day activities;
Sustainability criteria will be incorporated into calls for tenders;
A Supplier Code of Conduct will be adopted;
A regulation and accompanying procedures for managing McGill’s used and end of life (U/EoL) IT equipment will be adopted and rolled-out.
Procurement Services will engage McGill’s academic community in supporting sustainable procurement and provide students with the opportunity to conduct applied student research projects.

Source: Vision2020 Sustainability Strategy (2014-2016) Priority Action Briefs
Link: https://www.mcgill.ca/sustainability/files/sustainability/vision_2020_priority_action_briefs.pdf

5 Year Sustainable Procurement Strategic Plan.
The Sustainable Procurement Core Team, in collaboration with Procurement Services staff, has developed and adopted a 5 Year Sustainable Procurement Strategic Plan. The plan is closely aligned with the University’s Vision 2020 Sustainability Goals and represents McGill’s first Sub-Institutional Sustainability Strategy. A series of clear Functional Objectives and related Actions have been identified under each Strategic Goal. The Sustainable Procurement Core Team has prioritized the actions to be carried out through specific Sustainable Procurement Projects. The group has also developed timelines and Key Performance Indicators for each project:

1. INSTITUTIONALIZATION
Operationalizing our Sustainable Procurement (SP) Vision, as set forth in the Procurement Policy. Demonstrating leadership in SP and generating support for the SP Vision and activities across campus and throughout the community. Build SP institutional memory and connect with internal stakeholders (including faculty and students) in moving forward on SP projects.

2. SUSTAINABLE PROCUREMENT TRAINING
Training Procurement Services staff in the practice of Sustainable Procurement (SP), to ensure that lifecycle thinking and triple bottom line principles are applied in their purchasing decisions, and on a University-wide basis, raise the awareness and knowledge of staff members who are in the position of influencing purchases of goods and services.

3. IT ASSET MANAGEMENT
In collaboration with IT Services, develop and adopt the necessary regulations, minimum standard requirements, and procedures to optimise the lifecycle management of McGill's IT resources. Operationalize McGill's 4-R hierarchy (rethink, reduce, reuse, recycle) as it applies to IT resources.

4. SUPPORT APPLIED STUDENT RESEARCH INITIATIVES
Engage McGill's academic community in supporting Sustainable Procurement and provide students with the opportunity to conduct useful reseach - create the "living lab".
Develop a network of Applied Student Research (ASR) supervisors in various faculties.
Contribute to the Project Manager for Sustainable Procurement (PM's) resources by generating useful information/reseach.
Offer stimulating learning experiences to students while integrating students' work with the University's Sustainable Operations.

5. SUSTAINABILITY IN CALLS FOR TENDERS
Incorporate sustainability criteria (including social, economic, and environmental aspects) in the University's call for tender documents, in accordance with the University's Procurement Policy. Gradually incorporate new criteria on an ongoing basis.

6. SUSTAINABLE PROCUREMENT CORE TEAM
Maintain a permanent Sustainable Procurement (SP) Core Team (with cross-functional representatives from McGill community) for envisioning, planning, and monitoring purposes. Engage McGill administrative units, faculties, and student body in supporting SP initiatives through Core Team involvement. Develop orientations and action planning with Core Team and meet on a regular basis to validate project advancement and obtain feedback and support.

7. COMMUNICATIONS
Communicate advancement of Sustainable Procurement (SP) vision/goals/projects to McGill community and external partners, including other institutions across Canada. Raise awareness about the importance of SP and its potential (or actual) contribution to attaining Vision 2020 objectives.

8. SUSTAINABLE PROCUREMENT FOR SUSTAINABLE RESEARCH PRACTICES
In collaboration with other administrative units and facutly, contribute to the advancement of sustainability in research practices by raising awareness, embedding sustainable procurement and purchasing in research spending, and strengthening the sustainability policies of granting agencies.

9. SUPPORT GENERAL ASSET MANAGEMENT PROJECT
In collaboration with the Office of VP-RIR, IT Services, Facilities Management and Ancillary Services, help develop and implement the necessary framework (including IT resources and governance mechanisms) for optimizing the lifecycle management of University assets, as required by governmental authorities and granting agencies.

10. PROCUREMENT SERVICES' SUSTAINABLE OPERATIONS
Investigate McGill Procurement Services' operations (and their current environmental, social, and economic impacts) and bring positive changes towards greater sustainbility.

11. SUPPLIER CODE OF CONDUCT
Develop, test, and adopt a Supplier Code of Conduct delineating the University's social, environmental and ethical exigencies for conducting business with suppliers and subcontractos. Substantiate the Procurement Policy's reference to human rights, environmental stewardship (including animal welfare), as well as ethical standards, and communicate McGill's Sustainale Procurement commitments to the market.

12. LICENSEE CODE OF CONDUCT
After the adoption of McGill's Supplier Code of Conduct, work with stakeholders across campus to develop and adopt a Licensee Code of Conduct (applicable to licensees using McGill's trademark and logos).

13. SUSTAINABLE PROCUREMENT GUIDELINES, MANUALS AND FAQ
Develop simple communication tools and general advice for implementing Sustainable Procurement at McGill. Delineate Community members' possible contribution and provide guidance for action.

14. ADAPTATION OF OUR CONTRACT MANAGER TOOL
Use Procurement Services' contract management tools to track and assess our contracted suppliers' sustainability commitments.

15. MORE SUSTAINABLE OPTIONS IN McGILL MARKETPLACE (MMP)
Work with suppliers to encourage them to incorporate, and highlight, more sustainable product options in MMP.

Source: Procurement 5 year Plan & Projects
Link to Plan: https://www.mcgill.ca/procurement/files/procurement/mcgill_2016_splc_awards_submission_01-04-2016.pdf
Link to Projects: https://www.mcgill.ca/procurement/sustainability/projects


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Transportation?:
No

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Transportation and the published plans in which each objective is included:

N/A


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Waste?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Waste and the published plans in which each objective is included:

VISION2020 Deliverables for 2014-2016 of VISION 2020 ACTION 10:

Buildings and Grounds will seek resources to a) conduct a campus waste assessment and issue recommendations, and b) to develop a waste action plan, informed by community engagement.

The use of printing and imaging solutions will be optimized in order to improve energy consumption, efficiency, and reduce waste material.

Source: Vision2020 Sustainability Strategy (2014-2016) Priority Action Briefs
Link: https://www.mcgill.ca/sustainability/files/sustainability/vision_2020_priority_action_briefs.pdf


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Water?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Water and the published plans in which each objective is included:

VISION2020 ACTION 10: WASTE MANAGEMENT
Conduct a campus waste assessment and develop a waste action plan.

A university’s approach to waste management is a highly-visible indicator of its dedication to principles
of sustainability. While McGill has made some progress in the realm of waste reduction
and management, progress has been limited by a lack of baseline knowledge concerning waste
production and management across the entire waste system. To reach new milestones in waste reduction
and earn points toward the AASHE Sustainability Tracking, Assessment, and Rating System
(STARS), Buildings and Grounds will seek resources to conduct a campus waste assessment and
to develop a waste action plan based on its findings in cooperation with the McGill community. The
student-led McGill Waste Project will also support the implementation of this action. To leverage
opportunities for waste reduction in the IT sector, Information Technology Services will also work to
optimize the use of printers and other imaging devices across campus.

DELIVERABLES FOR 2014-2016
• Buildings and Grounds will seek resources to a) conduct a campus waste assessment and
issue recommendations, and b) to develop a waste action plan, informed by community
engagement.
• The use of printing and imaging solutions will be optimized in order to improve energy
consumption, efficiency, and reduce waste material.

PARTNERS
Building and Grounds; Information Technology Services; McGill Waste Project

Source: Vision2020 Sustainability Strategy (2014-2016) Priority Action Briefs
Link: https://www.mcgill.ca/sustainability/files/sustainability/vision_2020_priority_action_briefs.pdf

McGill's water conservation strategy comprises Vision 2020 action 10: Waste Management, the recommendations of the Downtown Water Audit and of the Macdonald Water Audits, as well as McGill's construction and renovation standards which will bring about the phase-out of water-inefficient fixtures and equipment on campus.

Source: Energy Manager, Utilities and Energy Management


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Diversity & Affordability?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Diversity & Affordability and the published plans in which each objective is included:

ASAP (Achieving Strategic Academic Priorities) 2012 PLAN
2. Be a truly pan-Canadian and international university with a highly geographically diverse student population based on offering an enriched student life experience, appropriate program offerings and quality services for students → Emphasize innovative delivery of educational programs and appropriate levels of student aid to improve access to underrepresented population groups

Additional objective for 2017: Ensure and embrace the diversity in origin and ideas among students, faculty, and staff with appropriate programs and services.

Source: ASAP 2012
Link: https://www.mcgill.ca/asap/asap-2012-plan/asap-2012-major-strategic-objectives


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Investment & Finance?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Investment & Finance and the published plans in which each objective is included:

INVESTMENT POLICY
The overall objective of the McGill investment pool is to obtain a total return necessary to provide a dependable and optimal source of income for endowment beneficiaries, to cover the annual operating costs of the MIP and to preserve the capital of the MIP within the social and ethical norms of the University. This absolute objective is to seek an average total annual real rate of return of 5.15%, or a nominal return of 5.15% plus CPI and shall be measured over moving annualized five and ten-year time periods.Companies in the McGill investment portfolio that, by decisions of the Board, might cause concern to the University are reviewed by the Board’s Committee to Advise on Matters of Social Responsibility. The Committee is responsible for ensuring that the divestment decisions of the Committee to Advise on Matters of Social Responsibility are implemented in an orderly and timely manner.
Please consult the Statement of Investment Policy: https://www.mcgill.ca/secretariat/files/secretariat/statement_of_investment_policy_june_2015.pdf

VISION2020 - Action 13 DELIVERABLES FOR 2014-2016
• Public consultations will be conducted to provide members of the McGill community with an
opportunity to submit their perspective on the draft revision of the CAMSR (Committee Advisory on Matters of Social Responsibility) Terms of Reference.
• The members of CAMSR will be encouraged and supported to commission an independent
review of best practices in the field of socially responsible investment, in accordance with
the expanded mandate foreseen in the draft revision of the CAMSR Terms of Reference.

BOARD OF GOVERNORS COMMITTEE TO ADVISE ON MATTERS OF SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
REPORT to the BOARD on DIVEST MCGILL SUBMISSION of FEBRUARY 2015
MARCH 17, 2016
"CAMSR proposes that the Board ask the Investment Committee, while exercising its fiduciary
duty, to consider and report back on by December 2016, measures such as set out below.
-Establishing a socially responsible investment fund option for donors interested in such
an option - similar to the fund established for pension investments
-Looking at opportunities for, and supporting, sound investments in alternative
(renewable) energy firms, alternative technology development and commercialization
-Developing ESG principles and guidelines for endowment investments
-Asking investment managers to report annually on ESG and UNPRI implementation and
compliance, which will in turn be reported to the Board
-Supporting and initiating shareholder resolutions to encourage changes in company
practices deemed inconsistent with ESG and UNPRI"

https://www.mcgill.ca/boardofgovernors/files/boardofgovernors/gd15-44_camsr_report_0.pdf


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address Wellbeing & Work?:
Yes

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address Wellbeing & Work and the published plans in which each objective is included:

VISION2020 CONNECTIVITY OBJECTIVES
-McGill supports the health and happiness of students, faculty and staff, and facilitates their integration into the McGill
community.
-Community engagement—within and beyond McGill—is valued as a core element of the McGill student, staff and
faculty experience.
-McGill sustains many strong, reciprocal relationships with partners in local, regional and global communities.
-Knowledge flows freely in all directions—within McGill, from McGill to the communities to which we belong and from
those communities to McGill.

Source: Vision 2020 Sustainability Strategy 2014-2016
Link: https://www.mcgill.ca/sustainability/files/sustainability/v2020_ss_eng.pdf

MYWORKPLACE PLAN
“My Workplace” aims to facilitate a shift in McGill’s administrative workplace culture: to embrace continuous learning and change, to inspire and encourage new ways of doing things, and to empower administrative staff to use their knowledge and expertise to make McGill a more agile and effective organization.

Goals
-Empowering employees to identify opportunities for greater efficiency, simplification and process improvement
-Better aligning our resources to needs and priorities
-Identifying measures to ensure that the hiring of new administrative staff is done strategically
-Using technological tools to make our operations more efficient
-Continuing to ensure that employees are well trained for their jobs, and developing more ways for them to learn from each other
-Encouraging a culture that embraces changes and welcomes new ideas

Projects
-Training and development for staff and managers
-Sharing of information and best practices
-Increasing local autonomy and flexibility in work practices and decision-making.
-Supporting staff in introducing process change, better service delivery and other administrative improvements.
-Within existing budget envelopes, encouraging and supporting managers in planning future staffing needs, training and development needs and implementing effective performance management.

Source: MyProject
Link: https://www.mcgill.ca/principal/five-priorities/my-workplace


Taken together, do the plan(s) reported above include measurable sustainability objectives that address other areas (e.g. arts and culture or technology)?:
No

A list or sample of the measurable sustainability objectives that address other areas and the published plans in which each objective is included:

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Does the institution have a formal statement in support of sustainability endorsed by its governing body (e.g. a mission statement that specifically includes sustainability and is endorsed by the Board of Trustees)? :
Yes

The formal statement in support of sustainability:

----------------------------------------------
"
SUSTAINABILITY POLICY - 2010
McGill University aspires to achieve the highest possible standards of sustainability on its campuses and in its day-to-day activities through its academic practices, in its facilities and operations, and by its outreach to the broader community. We strive to be a leader in research and education, creating and communicating the knowledge required for humans to live sustainably at the local, regional and global scales. We will meet or exceed in our operations governmental standards of sustainability for educational institutions and the norms of sustainability achieved by our comparator universities. Our goal is to become an institutional model of sustainability for society as we pursue our academic mission and play a positive and proactive role in communicating the rationale and need to develop and implement sustainable practices in the broader community.

To this end, McGill University will:

Undertake the activities and operations of the University in a manner that strikes an appropriate balance between the needs and aspirations of current and future generations of the McGill and broader communities;
Foster inquiry into sustainability through teaching, research and the university experience;
Share knowledge to stimulate innovation, raise awareness and ensure effective participation of the McGill community in the implementation of sustainable practices;
Encourage economic efficiencies in the University’s operations that are consistent with social equity and respect for the environment;
Promote a healthy, safe and productive work and learning environment for the McGill community;
Advance individual and collective efforts and accountabilities throughout the McGill community to make sustainability a priority in the life of the University;
Identify and conserve the cultural and natural heritage of McGill University, including properties, buildings, landscapes, traditions and knowledge, taking their intrinsic rarity and fragility into account; and
Minimize the use and consumption of energy and material resources in recognition of the finite capacity of the biosphere to accommodate human activities.
Accompanying principles

Among other initiatives undertaken in support of this Policy, the University will:

Consider activities carried out by or on behalf of the University in light of their life cycle, including their economic, environmental and social footprints;
Establish sustainability indicators to enable accountability, to communicate specific goals, and to monitor and report on progress;
Prepare and regularly update a sustainability plan with specific goals and objectives; and
Report annually on progress to the McGill community."

Source/Link: https://www.mcgill.ca/sustainability/vision-2020-sustainability-strategy/governance-administration/policies#sustainability
-------------------------------------------

ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY - 2001
We at McGill University are committed to fulfilling our academic mission and managing all resources in harmony with our natural environment. We are committed to meeting our social, scientific, ethical and educational leadership responsibility in actively promoting the restoration and preservation of a healthy environment for the future and in contributing to building an equitable world.

Our commitment to raising environmental awareness and acting on it is manifested in our teaching and research activities, in other services which we provide to the McGill community and society at large, and in the individual and collective decisions which we take to offset the negative impact of the University's operation and activities on the Environment.

We are committed to increasing the University community's awareness of environmental issues, by fostering the appropriate values, knowledge, and skills to enable us to work towards the restoration and preservation of the Environment.

Accompanying principles
McGill University shall strive to be recognized as an environmentally safe and responsible institution of learning, and as a model of environmentally responsible living. To this end, the McGill University community shall make every reasonable effort to:

Prevent the over-consumption of energy and other resource and reduce the production of waste, and the release of substances harmful to the biosphere;
Maintain purchasing policies which favor environmentally-benign, post-consumer, bio-degradable, and non-toxic products wherever possible;
Encourage all members of the McGill community to be environmentally aware and the University's Environmental Policy to be well publicized;
Encourage all members of the McGill community to Re-think/Reduce/Re-use/Recycle. Given the costs that recycling entails, reduce and re-use options shall always be considered first; and
Seek additional ways of achieving our goal of being environmentally safe and responsible.
"
Source/Link: https://www.mcgill.ca/sustainability/vision-2020-sustainability-strategy/governance-administration/policies#environment
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The institution’s definition of sustainability (e.g. as included in a published statement or plan):

"There is no single definition of sustainability. Sustainability involves recognizing the interdependence and complexity of systems. Sustainability is not just about being green; it has social and economic dimensions as well. Sustainability is a process and depends on both local and global contexts. Sustainability at McGill concerns itself with how we educate and conduct research, connect and communicate, and operate and govern ourselves."

Source/Link: https://www.mcgill.ca/sustainability/files/sustainability/moos_primer.pdf


Is the institution an endorser or signatory of the following? :
Yes or No
The Earth Charter ---
The Higher Education Sustainability Initiative (HESI) ---
ISCN-GULF Sustainable Campus Charter ---
Second Nature’s Carbon Commitment (formerly known as the ACUPCC), Resilience Commitment, and/or integrated Climate Commitment ---
The Talloires Declaration (TD) Yes
UN Global Compact ---
Other multi-dimensional sustainability commitments (please specify below) Yes

A brief description of the institution’s formal sustainability commitments, including the specific initiatives selected above:

McGill’s commitment to sustainability reaches back several decades and spans scales from local to global. The sustainability declarations that we have signed affirm our role in helping to shape a future where people and the planet can flourish.

Talloires Declaration (1990)
Composed in 1990 at an international conference in Talloires, France, this is the first official statement made by university administrators of a commitment to environmental sustainability in higher education. The Talloires Declaration (TD) is a ten-point action plan for incorporating sustainability and environmental literacy in teaching, research, operations and outreach at colleges and universities. It has been signed by over 350 university presidents and chancellors in over 40 countries.

Halifax Declaration (1991)
From December, 9 through 11, 1991, the presidents and senior representatives of 33 universities from 10 countries on 5 continents met in Halifax, Canada to take stock of the role of universities regarding the environment and development. They were joined by a number of senior representatives from business, the banking community, governments, and non-governmental organizations. The meetings were sponsored by the International Association of Universities, the United Nations University, the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada, and Dalhousie University, Canada, which also provided the detailed planning and secretariat support. The Halifax Declaration was released at the conclusion of the conference.

Universitas21 Sustainability Declaration (2009)
Universitas 21 is an international network of 23 leading research-intensive universities in fifteen countries. Collectively, its members enrol over 700,000 students, employ over 145,000 staff and have approaching 2.5 million alumni. Their collective budgets amount to over US$13bn and they have an annual research grant income of over US$3bn. The network's purpose is to facilitate collaboration and cooperation between the member universities and to create opportunities for them on a scale that none of them would be able to achieve operating independently or through traditional bilateral alliances.

Ville de Montreal plan de developpement durable (2010)
McGill signed the first plan (2005-2009) and the second (2010-2015), committing to action that contributes to moving Montreal toward sustainability.

Declaration of the island of Montreal community in favour of biodiversity and greening (2010)
McGill signed on to the declaration in 2010. This acknowledged the importance of taking action on biodiversity at a local level.


The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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For more information about the sustainability plans in each area, please contact the respective accountable party(ies) as relevant.

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.