Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 65.89
Liaison Julie Newman
Submission Date Oct. 23, 2018
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
PA-7: Affordability and Access

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 3.75 / 4.00 MIT Office of Sustainability
Director
Office of Sustainability
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have policies and programs to make it accessible and affordable to low-income students?:
Yes

A brief description of any policies and programs to minimize the cost of attendance for low-income students:

MIT is one of five selective colleges and universities in the United States that is fully need-blind in their undergraduate admissions policies and that meet the full financial need of every student. MIT works closely with all families who qualify for financial aid to develop an individual affordability plan tailored to their financial circumstances. For students with family incomes under $90,000 a year, the Institute continues to ensure that scholarship funding will allow them to attend MIT tuition-free, a policy put in place in 2008.


A brief description of any programs to equip the institution’s faculty and staff to better serve students from low-income backgrounds:

Student Support Services at MIT streamlines the help-seeking process by being an easy and central place to ask for help. Our deans work with students on a wide variety of issues, including both personal and academic concerns. In fact, many students who seek our services are dealing with a combination of personal and academic difficulties.


A brief description of the institution’s programs to guide and prepare students and families from low-income backgrounds for higher education:

MIT works closely with all families who qualify for financial aid to develop an individual affordability plan tailored to their financial circumstances. Each undergraduate student's affordability plan comprises a mixture of a family contribution, scholarships and grants, student employment and loans.


A brief description of the institution's scholarships for low-income students:

MIT undergraduates receive need-based scholarships and grants from MIT, the federal government, state governments as well as scholarships and grants from private (outside) sources that may be need- or merit-based. For students with family incomes under $90,000 a year, the Institute continues to ensure that scholarship funding will allow them to attend MIT tuition-free, a policy put in place in 2008.


A brief description of the institution’s targeted outreach to recruit students from low-income backgrounds:

MIT provides detailed information to prospective students about the affordability, culture and value at MIT. In the past, MIT has provided targeted outreach to high school students with grades and scores that would make them competitive in MIT’s applicant pool, and because they attend schools with high levels of poverty (as measured by percentage of students who qualify for the federal free/reduced price lunch program.) The Admissions Office will once again reimburse the expenses for students of modest means to take part in Campus Preview Weekend (CPW), MIT’s open house weekend for all admitted students.


A brief description of the institution’s other policies or programs to make the institution accessible and affordable to low-income students:

MIT also has a First Generation Program (FGP) committed to building a sense of community among first generation MIT students, faculty, alumni, and staff, and raising awareness of their unique experiences. Through this network, the program enhances the academic success, professional growth, and personal development of first generation students at MIT. Student Financial Services also provides students with tools and resources for managing their expenses while a student at MIT.


Does the institution have policies and programs to support non-traditional students?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s scholarships provided specifically for part-time students:

Need-based financial aid is available for all undergraduates, including part-time students. MIT works closely with all families who qualify for financial aid to develop an individual affordability plan tailored to their financial circumstances.


A brief description of the institution’s on-site child care facility, partnership with a local facility, and/or subsidies or financial support to help meet the child care needs of students:

MIT Technology Childcare Centers offers scholarships to eligible Institute employees, including postdoctoral associates and postdoctoral fellows who have a child or children enrolled in one of MIT’s Technology Childcare Centers (TCC). There are a limited number of spots for MIT graduate student families. If you are eligible for a scholarship, the amount of your award will vary according to your financial need, the number of enrolled childcare days, your TCC tuition, and the availability of funds when you submit your application. Scholarships are granted for up to one year. Families are encouraged to re-apply annually. MIT also offers a program of subsidized backup childcare for MIT graduate students as part of its support for student families.


A brief description of the institution’s other policies and programs to support non-traditional students:

MIT also offers the MIT Professional Education Advanced Study Program, which is a chance to enroll in MIT's STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) classes as a non-degree student for a semester, a year, or longer.


Does the institution wish to pursue Part 2 of this credit (tracking accessibility and affordability)? (If data is not available, select 'No'):
Yes

The percentage of entering students that are low-income (0-100):
17

The graduation/success rate for low-income students (0-100):
86

On average, the percentage of need that was met for students who were awarded any need-based aid (e.g. as reported to the U.S. Common Data Set initiative, item H2) (0-100):
100

The percentage of students graduating with no interest-bearing student loan debt or for whom no out-of-pocket tuition is required (i.e. the percentage of graduates who have not taken out interest-bearing loans) (0-100):
72

Estimated percentage of students that participate in or directly benefit from the institution’s policies and programs to support low-income and non-traditional students (0-100):
56

The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.