Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 65.89
Liaison Julie Newman
Submission Date Oct. 23, 2018
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
EN-5: Outreach Campaign

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 4.00 / 4.00 MIT Office of Sustainability
Director
Office of Sustainability
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Has the institution held at least one sustainability-related outreach campaign during the previous three years that was directed at students and yielded measurable, positive results in advancing sustainability? :
Yes

Has the institution held at least one sustainability-related outreach campaign during the previous three years that was directed at employees and yielded measurable, positive results in advancing sustainability?:
Yes

Name of the campaign:
MIT Climate Change Conversation

A brief description of the campaign, including how students and/or employees were engaged:

In 2015, the MIT Change Climate Conversation sought to engage students in a discussion around how MIT, the U.S., and the world could most effectively address global climate change. Campaign strategies included: a listening tour, events, and social media engagement via Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, MIT TechTV, as well as an email and a blog. Two of the six listening events specifically targeted students and were held later in the day and led by student members of the Climate committee, in addition to other committee members.


A brief description of the measured positive impact(s) of the campaign:

The Conversation was successful at raising awareness about global climate change and engaging students in active inquiry. 268 students submitted ideas to an online idea bank about campus operations, finance, education, policy, and research. 3,202 were students (undergraduate and graduate) responded to a survey designed to gauge the community’s interests in various topics in the arena of climate change. Events drew hundreds of MIT students to actively participate in learning and dialog. A fossil fuel divestment debate had the largest audience, with approximately 500 members from the MIT community in attendance – many of whom were students. A final report compiled this input and engagement into a series of recommendations for the Institute.


The website URL where information about the campaign is available:
Name of the campaign (2nd campaign):
Access MIT - “Your commute counts: switch it up”

A brief description of the campaign, including how students and/or employees were engaged (2nd campaign):

In conjunction with the launch of new employee commuter benefits in 2016, MIT launched an employee-centered campaign called “Your commute counts: switch it up.” The campaign developed a branding and messaging strategy and distributed posters, stickers, digital signage, and videos to educate employees about their new options and encourage them to choose a low carbon commute. Additionally, a research team conducted an experimental email campaign targeted at full-time parkers providing information and financial awards for parking less.


A brief description of the measured positive impact(s) of the campaign (2nd campaign):

Early data suggests that the new benefits, bolstered by the campaigns, have reduced parking demand on campus and increased public transit usage among employees. Parkers targeted during the experimental email campaign showed that financial rewards and a desire to reduce their carbon footprint influenced how frequently they drove to work.


The website URL where information about the campaign is available (2nd campaign):
A brief description of other sustainability-related outreach campaigns, including measured positive impacts:
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The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
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Additional documentation to support the submission:
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The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.