Overall Rating Silver
Overall Score 61.29
Liaison Kalen Pilkington
Submission Date Aug. 31, 2018
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

MacEwan University
OP-21: Hazardous Waste Management

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 0.50 / 1.00 Stephen Luyendyk
Senior Manager Operations
Operations
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have strategies in place to safely dispose of all hazardous, special (e.g. coal ash), universal, and non-regulated chemical waste and seek to minimize the presence of these materials on campus?:
Yes

A brief description of steps taken to reduce hazardous, special (e.g. coal ash), universal, and non-regulated chemical waste:

(1) MacEwan University promotes the use of rechargeable batteries to reduce the use and disposal of single-use alkaline batteries and purchases high-efficiency light bulbs to reduce the need to replace and dispose.

(2) There are different protocols in place for individual departments producing hazardous waste.
Most chemical waste is generated by the Department of Physical Sciences.
This Department, for instance, engages in a number of use minimization and pollution prevention practices also designed to mitigate fiscal and environmental impacts (pg. 138). In Winter 2015, the Department trialed and has since implemented an acetone recovery program, where used acetone waste was collected and redistilled, in order to reduce both acetone expenditure and hazardous waste volumes.
Further practices to prevent and minimize waste include:
- Ensuring all waste delivered to the municipal drainage system has neutral pH prior to its release into the municipal drainage system by plumbing all laboratory sinks and drains to an acid neutralization tank.
- Utilizing oil traps and filters on all high vacuum pumps to prevent oil contamination (and thus need for oil replacement).
- Utilizing cold traps in-sequence on central vacuum systems to prevent release of solvents.
- Utilizing secondary traps on rotary evaporators to prevent release of solvents.
- Utilizing recirculating chillers on rotary evaporators to remove the need for a continuous water supply when condensing solvents.
- Sourcing and accepting chemical donations from industry.

(3) The Office of Sustainability and the Health, Safety, Environment Department are currently working on a Green Labs program which is intended to provide MacEwan labs with guidelines and resources to implement sustainable practices while contributing to a healthy and safe working environment.
If faculties complete the checklist with an 80% score or higher, they will be certified as a MacEwan certified green lab for 3 years (Acknowledgement includes a plaque to place outside the lab and recognition from the Provost and VP Academic).
The green labs checklist includes action items regarding waste reduction and handling, energy, chemical, water, field/work trips, safe work environments, accessibility, etc.

(4) Hazardous Material Information System:
This system is monitored by the Office of Health, Safety & Environment. It was developed to track the number of chemicals stored and used throughout the University. Every administrative department and Faculty that works with chemicals have been provided training on the system and access to the database. We currently have approximately 3850 chemical products tracked across MacEwan University. The system has links to the chemical's Safety Data Sheet and location. We are working on incorporating volume tracking into this database. At this time, each Faculty Department tracks the volume of chemicals on department spreadsheets, and conducts an annual inventory. The departments do not exchange chemicals, but order in small quantities to ensure we are not stockpiling.


A brief description of how the institution safely disposes of hazardous, universal, and non-regulated chemical waste:

(1) Maintenance staff are responsible for changing and disposing of light bulbs and fluorescent tubes. These are stored in containers provided by the recycling contractor for safe storage until collection. Bulbs and tubes are boxed up and counted before collection can happen.

Special containers are available in each lab for safe disposal of biological waste. Biological waste and chemical waste are handled and disposed of by lab technicians who contact contractor for collection.
Each department is responsible for collecting and storing small quantities of used batteries. Once the bin is full, the department contacts Facilities to collect the batteries. They are taken to Shipping and Receiving where the contractor collects them for safe disposal. Sharps and clinical waste are handled and disposed of by departmental program labs, who coordinate collection with contractor when appropriate.

(2) The Department of Physical Science follows specific disposal and treatment protocols that are driven by City, Provincial, and Federal regulations:
• City of Edmonton Drainage Bylaw (Bylaw 16200)
• Alberta Environment Protection and Enhancement Act
• Canadian Environmental Protection Act
• Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act

As stated in the safety manual (pg. 136): “Hazardous waste is periodically collected and disposed of by Tervita Environmental Services. Tervita manages the disposal protocols based on the nature of the waste provided. The type of hazardous laboratory waste must be clearly identified for acceptance by Tervita (e.g. halogenated solvents, non-halogenated solvents, heavy metal solutions, gas cylinder, sharps, etc.) and drives both transportation of the waste, and its disposal. Tervita conducts confirmatory testing of all waste provided to ensure that appropriate disposal protocols are followed. (…)”

Furthermore, the Department engages in a number of sustainable waste management practices designed to mitigate fiscal and environmental impacts. These include:
- On-site conversion (using established protocols) of hazardous chemical waste to non-hazardous waste that can be disposed of via municipal waste and/or drainage services.
- Organized and efficient collection and segregation of hazardous and non-hazardous waste.
(…)
(Please see attachment pg. 72 et seqq., 136 et seqq.)


A brief description of any significant hazardous material release incidents during the previous three years, including volume, impact and response/remediation:

No incidents in the past three years have been reported.


A brief description of any inventory system employed by the institution to facilitate the reuse or redistribution of laboratory chemicals:

Hazardous Material Information System:
This system is monitored by the Office of Health, Safety & Environment. It was developed to track the number of chemicals stored and used throughout the University. Every administrative department and Faculty that works with chemicals have been provided training on the system and access to the database. We currently have approximately 3850 chemical products tracked across MacEwan University. The system has links to the chemical's Safety Data Sheet and location. We are working on incorporating volume tracking into this database. At this time, each Faculty Department tracks the volume of chemicals on department spreadsheets, and conducts an annual inventory. The departments do not exchange chemicals, but order in small quantities to ensure we are not stockpiling.


Does the institution have or participate in a program to responsibly recycle, reuse, and/or refurbish electronic waste generated by the institution?:
Yes

Does the institution have or participate in a program to responsibly recycle, reuse, and/or refurbish electronic waste generated by students?:
Yes

A brief description of the electronic waste recycling program(s), including information about how electronic waste generated by the institution and/or students is recycled:

"Staff and faculty can contact Facilities for disposal and recycling of any equipment that is battery operated or powered with a cord (electronic waste). Facilities brings electronic waste and their peripherals to Shipping and Receiving for storage until they are ready for collection by contractor.

For students and the Edmonton community, MacEwan University hosts two annual e-waste drives (Electronics Recycling Bitz) across all campuses. During this period, people are invited to drop off their unwanted or broken electronics for recycling and disposal."


Is the institution’s electronic waste recycler certified under the e-Stewards and/or Responsible Recycling (R2) standards?:
No

Electronic waste recycled or otherwise diverted from the landfill or incinerator during the most recent year for which data is available during the previous three years:
7.37 Tonnes

The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:

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