Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 65.79
Liaison Katharine Gross
Submission Date Feb. 26, 2021

STARS v2.2

Lehigh University
OP-11: Sustainable Procurement

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.00 / 3.00 Jane Altemose
Sourcing Manager
Purchasing
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have written policies, guidelines, or directives that seek to support sustainable purchasing across multiple commodity categories institution-wide?:
Yes

A copy of the policies, guidelines or directives:
The policies, guidelines or directives:

PURPOSE
This policy is written to establish a common interpretation of what Sustainable Procurement encompasses within Lehigh University and to ensure University personnel consider social and environmental responsibility as factors in their purchasing decisions.

Sustainability is defined as, “Meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” (Brundtland Report, 1987).

This widely accepted definition pertains to decisions having impact on the future economy, environment or society. These impacts have greater/further/wider reaching effects compared to past or traditional “green” approaches to purchasing such as considerations for fair labor practices, ethical business practices, utilization of local businesses, etc. Execution of this policy will assist the University in understanding and responding to the strategic, reputational and operational implications inherent in its procurement decisions.

Economy:
Collaborative procurement increases sustainability and efficiency through leverage and shared costs; consequently increasing value while reducing risk.

Environment:
Lehigh University is committed to minimizing or reducing effects from greenhouse gases (GHGs) through the purchase of products and services that will save energy in their operation, transportation, and/or production, advancing the University’s overarching sustainability goals.

Environmental Aspects- Technology, Energy & Water, Recycling, Chemicals, Virgin Materials, Transportation & Packaging

Social & Ethical:
Because sustainable procurement incorporates awareness of socio-economic factors, it recognizes for example, the social and ethical impact of local procurement and holds the potential to support economic regeneration. Sustainable procurement also embraces and fosters an environment built upon ethical codes of conduct and principled procurement practice.

Social & Ethical Aspects- Employment, Diversity, Labor Conditions, Community, Employee Health & Safety, Non-discrimination

KEY PRINCIPLES
By implementing a policy of sustainable purchasing, the University recognizes the following principles:
• Purchasing activities have a fundamental role in minimizing environmental impact and managing risks.
• Investment decisions delivered through the purchasing process must establish resilient infrastructure and supply chains to both mitigate and adapt to climate change.
• Economic, environmental and social objectives in purchasing activities cannot be viewed in isolation.

KEY OBJECTIVES
Demonstrate the University commitment to sustainability through:
• Procurement goods and services that deliver long-term value for money for both the University and public sector as a whole.
• Selection of goods manufactured, delivered, used and disposed of in an environmentally and socially responsible manner.
• Supporting local and regional businesses to contribute towards a stronger and more vibrant local economy.
• Model sustainable environmental and social purchasing to our community of consumers and vendors.

POLICY
Consistent with the University’s goals, all University personnel shall conduct purchasing in accordance with the following principles:
A. Utilize procurement of goods and services as a means to act on the University’s values of social responsibility and environmental sustainability.
B. Support the University policy of striving for zero waste by reducing overall consumption and shifting to products with reduced product lifecycle impact.
C. Support the University commitment to eliminate and offset our greenhouse gas emissions.
D. Consider total cost of ownership rather than low purchase price as the only factor when evaluating the financial competitiveness of purchasing decisions.
E. Require sustainability standards and certifications whenever possible, with preference for those which are developed by third-parties and independently verified throughout a products total chain of custody.
F. Continuously improve sustainable purchasing practices.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF PROCUREMENT SERVICES
Lehigh is committed to actions designed to conserve and protect the environment, and will continue to implement those actions whenever possible and economically feasible. In practice, the objective is to purchase products that have reduced environmental impact because of the way they are made, transported, stored, packed, used and disposed.

It is the responsibility of Procurement Services, in conjunction with all University departments, to promote the development and use of environmentally and socially acceptable products and services through the following activities:
A. Purchasing Services shall define environmental certifications that are acceptable to the University and purchase products and services that meet these certifications (e.g. Energy Star, EPEAT, etc.) and integrate environmental factors into the University’s buying decisions where certifications have not been defined.
B. Developing tools to determine appropriate metrics and provide ongoing reporting; assist in identifying and financially justifying green products and services, make it easier to measure achievement of goals, and integrate sustainable purchasing into everyday decisions.
C. Purchasing Services will carry out an environmental assessment to identify target product and service areas (major suppliers) and identify areas of opportunity for each.
D. Consulting with all user departments to identify new environmentally friendly products and services as well as improvements/changes in industry standards that may impact the environment.
E. Purchasing from suppliers that provide environmentally preferable products and services or suppliers that are environmentally sensitive in their daily operations.
F. Seeking new suppliers and encouraging existing suppliers to review the manner in which their goods are packaged. Working with suppliers in the areas of reduction and reuse of packaging materials.
G. Reviewing contracts, bids and specifications for goods and services to ensure that, whenever possible and economical, they are amended to provide for the expanded use of products and services that contain the maximum level of post-consumer reusable or recyclable waste / or recyclable content, without significantly affecting the intended use of the product or service.
H. Using cost/benefit analysis to arrive at the correct sourcing decision; one that remains economically practical, reflects effective purchasing practices and satisfies the requirements of the user department.
I. Making suppliers aware of the Lehigh’s Sustainable Purchasing Policy and monitor critical suppliers on an ongoing basis with regard to their environmental policies and practices.
J. Utilizing the Sustainable Purchasing checklist below for use in University purchasing.
K. Ongoing evaluation of the efforts the department has made to help protect and preserve the environment and what the future goals are for the up-coming year.
L. Liaise with other sustainability groups across campus to facilitate their sustainability goals.
M. Defining procedures regarding exemptions from or non-compliance with the Sustainable Purchasing Policy
N. Supporting local and diverse businesses (minority, woman, or veteran-owned, etc.)
O. Make every effort to secure contracts with suppliers that are environmentally and socially conscientious whenever practicable. Examination of supplier’s labor/working conditions and environmental practices when negotiating long term supply contracts: Is the company producing the product in compliance with all environmental laws and regulations? What is the supplier’s record in handling environmental and safety issues? Can the supplier verify all environmental claims? Does the supplier have a company environmental policy statement? What programs are in place/planned for promoting resource efficiency? Are printed materials available documenting these programs? Has the supplier conducted an environmental or waste audit? Is the supplier equipped to bid and bill electronically? Has an environmental life-cycle analysis of the product (and its packaging) been conducted by a certified testing organization, such as Green Seal?

When determining whether a product is environmentally preferable, the following standards should be considered:
• Available locally
• Bio Based
• Biodegradable
• Carcinogen-free
• Chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) free
• Compostable
• Durable, reusable or refillable
• Energy and water efficient  Heavy metal free (i.e. no lead, mercury, cadmium)
• Low toxicity
• Low volatile organic compound (VOC) content
• Made from renewable products
• Persistent, Bio accumulative Toxic (PBT) free
• Post-consumer content
• Recycled content/recyclable
• Reduced greenhouse gas emissions
• Reduced packaging
• Refurbished/refurbish able Highly energy efficient in production and use
• Manufactured by suppliers with good environmental and social sustainability track records
• Cause minimal or no environmental damage during normal use or maintenance
• Replacing disposables with reusable or recyclable options
• Taking into account life cycle costs and benefits
• Shipped with minimal packaging, preferably made of recycled products

Examples of Environmentally Preferable Products include:
• LEDs
• Made of recycled materials, maximizing post-consumer content
• Durable, as opposed to single use or disposable items
• Non-toxic or biodegradable
• 30 - 100% recycled paper
• Computers w/EPEAT silver or better certification
• Energy Star rated appliance
• Office Supplies marked with environmental sign on catalog
• Non-toxic or minimally toxic, preferably biodegradable
• Compostable
• Waste-reduced products
• Water-saving products

When determining whether a supplier is socially sustainable, the following standards should be considered:
• Fair wages for employees
• Acceptable working time
• Adherence to child labor laws
• Occupational safety and health policies
• Equal opportunity and non-discrimination
• Inspection of suppliers’ facilities
• Protection of indigenous population rights
• Human rights compliance
• General compliance with other International Labor Standards

RESPONSIBILITIES OF DEPARTMENTS
A. Departments should use the information in this policy as a guideline for environmentally and socially preferable products and services being purchased for their department/mission.
B. Prior to purchasing a product or service, consider the following:
• Is the product really needed?
• Is the product size/magnitude necessary?
• Are all the features of the product necessary? Can any features be eliminated, is there a suitable alternative that is less harmful to the environment and safe to use?
• Is the product designed to be durable/long lasting?
• Are recycled materials used to make the product?
• Was the product produced locally? How far did it travel from where it was manufactured and where it is being used?
• Does the product contain any banned or restricted substances?
• Does the product contain any exotic/endangered materials? If wood is used in the product, what is the source and how is it harvested? Is the product manufactured from tropical rainforest wood?
• Is the product reusable, compostable, or recyclable following use?  Does the product require special disposal considerations?
• Is the product energy efficient?
• Is the product designed for easy maintenance and repair?
• Are replacement parts made from recycled materials and are they themselves reusable or recyclable?
• Are the products designed to reduce consumption and minimize waste?
• Is the product packaging minimal, made from recycled materials, and recyclable or reusable?
C. Inform employees of their responsibilities under this policy; provide them with information about recycled products and environmental procurement opportunities. Check the Purchasing or university Sustainability Web Pages for more information and updates on program efforts.
D. Submit new ideas or suggestions to Purchasing Services.

EXEMPTIONS
Nothing in this policy shall be construed as requiring a department to procure products that do not perform adequately for their intended use or are not available at a reasonable price in a reasonable period of time.

ENVIRONMENTALLY PREFERABLE PURCHASING (EPP) RESOURCES
A. EPA's Comprehensive Procurement Guidelines (http://www.epa.gov/cpg/)
B. EPA's EPP Web Site (www.epa.gov/oppt/epp)
C. EPPNet (www.nerc.org/eppnet.html)
D. Green Seal (www.greenseal.org)
E. EnergyStar (www.energystar.gov)
F. Lehigh University Sustainable Procurement Checklist

LEHIGH GREEN PRODUCT CERTIFICATIONS & DEFINITIONS
Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) - CFCs are chemical substances that can deplete the earth’s protective ozone layer in the upper atmosphere. In 1978, CFCs were banned for use as propellants in nearly all consumer aerosol products. They are gradually being phased out in all products and manufacturing processes.

Composting - The act of breaking down organic materials, such as food waste and yard trimmings, in the proper ratio in piles, vessels, or rows. The product, which is called compost or humus, can be used to provide minerals and nutrients for plants. Using compost can reduce the need for chemical fertilizers in landscaping and improve soil, water and air quality.

Energy Star - U.S. DOE and EPA’s program to save money and protect the environment through energy efficient products and practices.

EPEAT - Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool was developed with an EPA grant and is managed by the Green Electronics Council (GEC). EPEAT uses 23 required and 28 optional criteria to evaluate desktops and laptops, thin clients, workstations, and computer monitors. EPEAT Bonze meets the 23 criteria; EPEAT Silver meets the 23 criteria and at least 50% of the optional criteria; and EPEAT Gold meets the 23 criteria and at least 75% of the optional criteria. The criteria by which products are rated are: the reduction of environmentally-sensitive materials, materials selection, design for end-of-life, product longevity, energy conservation, end-of-life management, corporate performance, and packaging.

Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) - The term "independently certified forest products" refers to those products originating in a forest that an independent third party has certified as well-managed and sustainable. Forest certification validates on-the-ground operations employing the best management practices at a specific forest to ensure the long-term health of the total forest ecosystem. A forestry operation that meets FSC standards protects forest ecosystems, water quality, wildlife habitats and local communities. To ensure the integrity of the certification, the wood and fiber from certified forests are tracked through the commercial chain from logging sites to retailers and to the end user.

U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) - 501(c)(3) composed of leaders from every sector of the building industry working to promote buildings and communities that are environmentally responsible, profitable and healthy places to live and work. USGBC developed the LEED building rating system. The USGBC Logo is governed by strict legal guidelines.

Green Guard - Green Guard has three product certifications: 1) Green Guard Indoor Air Quality product certification for low emitting interior building materials, furnishings, and finish systems, 2) Green Guard Children & Schools, which a similar certification, but with more stringent emissions requirements according to CA 01350, and 3) Green Guard Building Construction to prevent mold in the design, construction, and ongoing operations.

Green Seal - Works with manufacturers, industry sectors, purchasing groups, and governments at all levels to "green" the production and purchasing chain. The non-profit utilizes a life-cycle approach, which means it evaluates a product or service beginning with material extraction, continuing with manufacturing and use, and ending with recycling and disposal.

LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) - A third-party certification program and the nationally accepted benchmark for the design, construction and operation of high performance green buildings developed by USGBC.

Organic - The National Organic Program (NOP) develops, implements, and administers national production, handling, and labeling standards for organic agricultural products. The NOP also accredits the certifying agents (foreign and domestic) who inspect organic production and handling operations to certify that they meet U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) standards.

Practical - Concerned with voluntary decisions related to Lehigh’s physical and financial capacity to use the product or service.

Recyclable - Relates to products made with materials that can be recycled, or the product can be broken down so individual parts can be recycled. Buyer beware that products with co-injected plastics, which are materials made of two types of plastic or a plastic and a fiber, make recycling difficult.

Recycled content - Materials recycled from previous end-users for use in new products. Recycled content can be pre-consumer or post-consumer recycled content.

Reusable - Products that can be used more than once for repeated use or for alternative purposes.

Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) - The Sustainable Forestry Initiative® (SFI®) label is a sign you are buying wood and paper products from well-managed forests, backed by a rigorous, third-party certification audit. Based on several reviews, FSC-certification is more rigorous and effective than SFI certification.

Terms Commonly Used in the Industry:
Carpet & Rug Institutional Green Label - Program to test carpet, cushions and adhesives to help specifiers identify products with very low emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

Cradle2Cradle - Third-party company that certifies products based on five criteria: environmentally safe and healthy materials; design for material reutilization, such as recycling or composting; the use of renewable energy and energy efficiency; efficient use of water and maximum water quality associated with production; and instituting strategies for social responsibility.

Environmental Choice/EcoLogo™ Program - EcoLogo™ was originally founded by the Government of Canada in 1988. It is classified as a Type I eco-label, as defined by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). This means that the Program compares products and services with others in the same category, develops rigorous and scientifically relevant criteria that reflect the entire lifecycle of the product, and awards the EcoLogo™ to those that are verified by an independent third party as complying with the criteria.

ISO 14001 - Management tool enabling an organization of any size or type to: identify and control the environmental impact of its activities, products or services; improve its environmental performance continually; and to implement a systematic approach to setting environmental objectives and targets, achieve the goals, and demonstrate that they have been achieved.

Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) - EPA-endorsed technique to assess a product, process, or service’s relevant energy and material inputs and environmental releases and the potential environmental impacts associated with the identified inputs and releases.

SMART© Sustainable Textile Standard 2.0 - Provides a market-based definition for Sustainable Textile, establish performance requirements for public health and environment, and address the triple bottom line, economic-environmental-social, throughout the supply chain.

Scientific Certification Systems - Provides third-party environmental, sustainability, and food quality certification, auditing, testing, and standards development. SCS has developed internationally recognized standards and certification programs.

SUSTAINABLE PURCHASING CHECKLIST
When purchasing, ask a supplier these questions. But first, determine if the product or service is truly necessary. Purchasing will need to be balanced with issues of product performance, cost, and availability.
(1) Waste reduction: Is the product durable? Can it be easily and economically serviced and maintained? Is the product designed to reduce consumption and minimize waste? Is the product reusable? Is the product technically and economically recyclable in the immediate area? Do facilities and internal collection systems exist to recycle the product? Can the product be returned to the supplier at the end of its useful life? Is the product compostable and are systems in place to compost the product on or off-site? Will the product biodegrade over time into harmless elements?
(2) Packaging: Is the product necessary? Can it be eliminated? Is minimal packaging used? Is the product packaged in bulk? Is the packaging reusable or recyclable? Are recycled materials used to produce the packaging and at what percent post-consumer waste? Can the packaging be returned to the supplier? Is the packaging compostable?
(3) Material source: Are recycled materials used in the product? If so, what percentage? What percentage of post-consumer materials is used? If wood is used in the product, what is its source and how is it harvested? Is the product manufactured from tropical rainforest wood?
(4) Energy efficiency: Is the product energy efficient compared to competitive products? Can the product be recharged? Can the product run on renewable fuels? Does the product require less energy to manufacture than competing products?
(5) Supplier environmental record: Is the company producing the product in compliance with all environmental laws and regulations? What is the company's record in handling environmental and safety issues? Can the company verify all environmental claims? Does the manufacturer/supplier have a company environmental policy statement? What programs are in place/planned for promoting resource efficiency? Are printed materials available documenting these programs? Has the company conducted an environmental or waste audit? Is the product supplier equipped to bid and bill electronically? Has an environmental life-cycle analysis of the product (and its packaging) been conducted by a certified testing organization, such as Green Seal? Does the supplier have a history of engaging in fair and ethical labor and business practices?

Are you confused about what makes a product green?
The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have several recommendations. If a product is labeled recycled, check how, and what percent is recycled. Products with claims, such as "environmentally friendly," "environmentally safe," "environmentally preferable," or "eco-safe,” are not helpful without more information or a recognizable seal. Biodegradable products break down in nature; however, if they end up in today’s landfills, they will most likely take decades to degrade. Many cleaning products labeled “biodegradable” always degraded in water before with no harm to the environment. Unlike the food industry, manufacturers of cleaning products are not required to identify ingredients. In sum, be sure to check labels and certifications when purchasing green products and services


Does the institution employ Life Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA) when evaluating energy- and water-using products and systems?:
Yes

Which of the following best describes the institution’s use of LCCA?:
Institution employs LCCA less comprehensively, e.g. for certain types of systems or projects and not others

A brief description of the LCCA policy and/or practices:

This is done within Dining Services and/or LU Facilities for large-scale assets such as buildings, building systems for new buildings, or when replacing electrical infrastructure, boilers, chillers, water fixtures, or other large components. This is not an institutional practice and generally does not involve the Purchasing Department.


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating chemically intensive products and services?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for chemically intensive products and services:

We had a consultant assist us in the RFP for the Janitorial Contract, with stringent cleaning chemical requirements. We will be re-bidding these services for 2021 and the chemical cleaner certifications and requirements will be re-evaluated at that time to ensure the most current sustainable products and procedures are implemented in the new contract.

Green Cleaning Guidelines
INTRODUCTION
The purpose and intent of the Green Cleaning program is to minimize exposure of chemical-based health, safety and environmental harm to property visitors and staff personnel from potentially hazardous chemical, biological and particle contaminants.

Green cleaning:
• Is defined as a process of "Cleaning to Protect Health without harming the Environment".
• Refers to using cleaning methods with environmentally-friendly ingredients and chemicals to preserve human health and environmental quality.
• Techniques and products avoid the use of chemically-reactive and toxic, some of which emit volatile organic compounds causing respiratory and dermatological problems among other adverse effects. In addition to reducing VOCs, it is one aspect of the building maintenance plan that can reduce bacteria and fungi.
• Can also describe the way residential and industrial cleaning products are manufactured, packaged and distributed. If the manufacturing process is environmentally-friendly and the products are biodegradable, then the term "green" or "eco-friendly" may apply.
• Prohibits cleaning products which contain various toxic chemicals (see below).

The product recommendations included in the CONTRACTOR’s plan are meant to provide currently acceptable cleaning products; however, substitute products may be used, provided they meet similar criteria.

Although it may not be possible to meet all suggested criteria below, CONTRACTORS should strive to meet as many as possible. The degree to which each CONTRACTOR complies with the recommendations with be a factor in the proposal evaluation process. In addition, CONTRACTOR’S use of products or processes that do not contain any environmental contaminants (Chemical Free Cleaning products) and help reduce the ecological impact of cleaning products that are flushed into the water supply/filtration system will also be a factor in the proposal evaluation process.

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS
The CLIENT and or its designee will be responsible for careful and considerate performance measuring, analysis, and reporting on management of its cleaning and janitorial maintenance services to reduce overall risk and provide a safe and effective work environment, while minimizing environmental impact. The following guidelines are provided to produce this result in the area of green cleaning and janitorial chemical use monitoring.

Green cleaning requirements as outlined by Green Certifying organizations and Chemical Free Cleaning will be used in development of performance measures for cleaning CONTRACTORs, and shall be written into each cleaning and maintenance contract. Review of the program may include chemical use listing, safety/incident review, and performance summary against pre-defined metrics.

Standards, product registrations, and cleaning practices are constantly evolving. Cleaning Managers must keep abreast of developments and strive for continual improvement in performance and environmental achievement.
Cleaning chemicals meet the requirements of Green Seal or Environmental Choice, who are both nonprofit standard setting organizations. Chemical Free Cleaning chemicals and other chemical cleaners not covered by these standard setting organizations should exhibit no, or low, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to minimize exposure to occupant health and the environment. Cleaning products may be concentrated and diluted through automated dilution control equipment to minimize worker exposure to concentrated chemicals and to minimize waste.

To aid in the selection of environmentally preferable cleaners, there are now emerging environmental standards for cleaning products that are available for use by the cleaning-products industry. In addition to meeting these standards, cleaning products must still fulfill the basic requirements for cost, performance, health, safety and environmental impact. In the end, all products must meet or exceed all federal, state and local standards for quality and safety requirements. The following are a few of these guidelines:

GREEN CHEMICAL CLEANING PRODUCT GUIDE:
For the purposes of this guide, “aerosol” is defined as a dispenser that holds a substance under pressure and that can release it as a fine spray (usually by means of a propellant gas).

Glass Cleaners, All Purpose Cleaners, General Purpose Cleaners and Washroom Cleaners shall meet the following requirements:
• Shall be non-aerosol, non-streaking, non-abrasive, rinse free and may be concentrated or ready-to-use.
• Product will be used for cleaning glass, Plexiglas, plastic, mirrors, chrome, porcelain, tile, ceramic tile, fiberglass linoleum, painted and unpainted surfaces.
• Product must have the ability to dissolve fats, grease, inks, dirt or petroleum hydrocarbons.
• GS-37 and/or CCD-146
• Chemical Free Cleaning products will leave no chemical residual in the air or on any surface after the cleaning activity.

Toilet Bowel Cleaner shall meet the following requirements:
• Product shall be non-corrosive, non-aerosol and fast penetrating to remove stains, eliminate and neutralize urine odors.
• Product will be used on porcelain and stainless steel.
• Chemical Free Cleaning products will leave no chemical residual in the air or on any surface after the cleaning activity.

Basin Tub & Tile Cleaner shall meet the following requirements:
• Product must be non-aerosol
• Effective for removing soap scum, suntan and body oils, mildew, lime, water scale and rust deposits.
• Product will be used on porcelain, tile, ceramic tile and fiberglass surfaces.
• Chemical Free Cleaning products will leave no chemical residual in the air or on any surface after the cleaning activity.

Other cleaning chemicals not covered by GS-37 (i.e. furniture polish, metal polish, disinfectants) shall meet the following requirements:
• California Code of Regulations for the maximum VOCs by product category.
AND/OR
• GS-34 and/or CCD-110 for Cleaning and Degreasing Compounds
• Chemical Free Cleaning products will leave no chemical residual in the air or on any surface after the cleaning activity.

Odor Control products shall be non-staining and meet the following requirements:
• Product must eliminate odors produced by cigar & cigarette smoke, urine & fecal matter, mildew, vomit, food spillage, garbage, cooked food, pets and perspiration.
• CCD-112 Digestion Additives for Cleaning and Odor Control
• CCD-113 Drain or Grease Traps Additives
• CCD-115 Odor Control Additives
• Chemical Free Cleaning products will leave no chemical residual in the air or on any surface after the cleaning activity.

Hand Soaps
• Hand soaps shall be free of antimicrobial ingredients except as preservatives or where required by code or regulation (i.e. food service and healthcare)
OR
• GS-41 and/or CCD-104
• Preference for the use of foaming dispensers to minimize product use
• In addition a strategy should be established to encourage frequent hand washing

Floor Care Products
• Floor finishes shall be durable to minimize the frequency of stripping and recoating, and low in VOCs., slip resistant and free of zinc (metal-free)
OR
• GS-40 and/or CCD-147
• When available, chemical concentrates dispensed from closed dilution systems must be used as alternatives to open dilution systems or non-concentrated products. Resilient tile and hard flooring coating systems, including floor finishes and restoration products shall be used in accordance with Green Seal GS-40 standard and shall be highly durable in order to maintain an acceptable level of protection and gloss for a minimum of one (1) year before stripping/removal and recoating is necessary.
• Chemical Free Cleaning products will leave no chemical residual in the air or on any surface after the cleaning activity.

Carpet Care
Products shall meet the following requirements:
• GS-37 and/or CCD-148
• Chemical Free Cleaning products will leave no chemical residual in the air or on any surface after the cleaning activity.

Microfiber:
The use of microfiber cloths and mops should be encouraged to improve cleanliness and to reduce the use of cleaning chemicals and water.

Vacuum Machines
Vacuum Cleaning equipment must meet the following requirements
• “Certification” by the Carpet & Rug Institute’s Green Label program to insure that they capture small particles. All equipment should have Sealed HEPA filtration.
• High speed machines must have dust shrouds and filtration systems.
• Floor burnishers include active-vacuum attachments to capture small particles.

Powered Equipment
• Vacuum Cleaners shall meet the requirements of CRI Green Labeled vacuums
• Carpet Extraction Equipment shall meet the requirements of CRI Bronze Seal of Approval at a minimum.
• Hot water extraction equipment shall be capable of removing sufficient moisture such that carpets can dry in less than 24 hours.
• Automatic Floor Scrubbing Machines shall be equipped with variable-speed chemical feed pumps to minimize the use of cleaning chemicals.
• Floor Burnishers shall contain shrouds and active vacuum attachments to capture particles produced during use
• Propane-powered floor equipment shall have high-efficiency, low-emissions engines
• Battery Powered Equipment shall be equipped with environmentally preferable gel batteries.
• Powered maintenance equipment should be equipped with vacuums, guards and/or other devices for capturing fine particulates.
• Where appropriate, active micro fiber technology shall be used to reduce cleaning chemical consumptions and prolong life of disposable scrubbing pads.
• Powered equipment will be ergonomically designed to minimize vibration, noise and user fatigue.
• Equipment shall have rubber bumpers to reduce potential damage to building surfaces
• Chemical Free Cleaning products will leave no chemical residual in the air or on any surface after the cleaning activity.

Reporting on Janitorial Powered Equipment
• Documentation shall be provided to demonstrate compliance with these requirements.
• A log shall be kept for all powered janitorial equipment to document the date of equipment purchase and all repair and maintenance activities and include manufacturer’s technical materials for each type of equipment in use in the logbook.

Carpet Extraction Equipment shall meet the requirements of:
• CRI Bronze Seal of Approval at a minimum
• Hot water extraction equipment shall be capable of removing sufficient moisture such that carpets can dry in less than 24 hours.
• Low environmental impact janitorial equipment includes the use of durable carpet care equipment, such as upright, backpack and wide area vacuums equipped with power heads meeting or exceeding the Carpet and Rug Institute “Green Label” and capable of capturing 96% of particulates 0.3 microns in size.
• Carpet extraction equipment shall be capable of removing sufficient moisture such that carpets can dry in less than 24 hours. Carpet care equipment shall be electric or battery powered and shall have a maximum sound level less than 70dBA.
• Wherever possible, carpet extraction method that reduces or eliminates the use of chemicals.
• Relevant maintenance/restoration practices and the dates of these activities.
• The duration between extraction cycles.
• Chemical Free Cleaning products will leave no chemical residual in the air or on any surface after the cleaning activity.

Recycling programs should be maintained and expanded if possible.

Training is an essential part of a successful Green Cleaning program, including the procedural training for cleaning personnel as well as for other building occupants, including staff and even visitors to help maintain a healthy environment. For example, visitors should understand what is required of them when using the building such as returning chairs and tables to their original places so that cleaning personnel can focus on cleaning.

We also require that an audit system be implemented to:
• Use Software systems similar to the ICM Performance Measurement system to monitor and improve cleanliness performance,
• Ensure that cleaning vendors are following guidelines given to them, and
• Identify areas where further “greening” of cleaning and other building maintenance efforts can be made.

Avoid the use of products containing chemicals hazardous to the environment or to those using the chemicals. For an up-to-date list and rating of hazardous chemicals review the information provided by the Janitorial Products Pollutions Prevention Project at:
www.westp2net.org/janitorial/tools/riskevaluation.htm.
Chemical Free Cleaning products will leave no chemical residual in the air or on any surface after the cleaning activity.

Prohibited Chemicals:
Prohibited materials include:
Acetone (MEK – methylethyl ketone)
Ammonia
Ammonia hydroxide
Bleach
Butoxyethanol
Descalers
Easy-Off
Glycol ethers
Lye
Lysol
Ozone-depleting compounds
Pine oils
Powdered cleaners
Steel Wool
Solvents Products containing:
Alkylphenol
Coconut Diethanolamide
Coconut Oil Diethanolamine
Dibutyyl phthalate
Diethanolamne
Diethylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether
Diethylene Glycol
Ethoxylates
Monoethyl Ether
N-methyl Pyrolidinone
Nonlphenol
Propylene Glycol

Metals, including but not limited to:
Arsenic
Cadmium
Chromium
Cobalt
Lead
Mercury
Nickel
Selenium
Zinc

All purpose cleaners should not have chelating agents, no silicates and be VOC-free
Other: Gasoline, Kerosene


Reports & Logs:
A Cleaning Chemical log will be kept that details all cleaning chemicals used or stored on the premises (stored products include those that are no longer used, but still in the building). Attachments to the log shall include manufacturer’s Material Safety Data Sheets and Technical Bulletins. The log shall identify:
1. An MSDS and/or label from the manufacturer specifying that the product meets the VOC content level for the appropriate product category as found in the California Code of Regulations.
2. A copy of any Certification, OR
3. If the product has not been certified by Green Seal, the manufacturer will provide test data documenting that the product meets each of the environmental health & safety criteria set forth in Green Seal Standard GS-37 and GS-34.

A Floor Care log will be maintained which lists all floor care equipment including vacuums (e.g. upright, backpack, wide area and wet/dry) and equipment used for maintaining resilient and hard floors (e.g. buffers, burnishers, and auto-scrubbers). Documentation will be kept on each piece of equipment identifying performance capabilities.
1. A floor maintenance plan will be kept which details the number of coats of floor finish being applied as the base coat and top coats, along with relevant maintenance/restoration practices. A log shall be kept identifying:
i. The dates of floor finish application activities.
ii. The dates of floor finish restoration and maintenance activities.
iii. The duration between stripping and recoat cycles.
A log shall be kept for all powered cleaning equipment. The log should identify the date of purchase and all repair and maintenance activities

Reporting on Paper
• Documentation shall be provided on individual product certifications or other technical data to demonstrate compliance with these requirements.
• A calculation of the fraction of covered materials purchased that meet one or more of the specified criteria (on a cost basis) shall be provided on a quarterly basis.

Minimum Chemical Requirements:
Ref RISK ACCEPTABLE LIMITS HIGH EXPOSURE RISK
G.1 Carcinogens
Reproductive Toxins In concentrated form, this product will contain less than 0.1% by weight of any ingredient that is a Carcinogen or Reproductive Toxin.

See Annual Report on Carcinogens (http://ntp-server.niehs.nih.gov) or California Safe Drinking Water (www.oehha.org/prop65.html) Or OSHA at (www.osha-sic.gov/SLTC/carcinogins.html) & (www.osha-sic.gov/SLTC/reproductivehazards.html)
Propylene Glycol; Diethanolamine; Diethylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether; Diethylene Glycol Monoethyl Ether;n-methyl Pyrlidinone; Coconut Diethanolamide; Coconut Oil Diethanolamine.

G.2 Neurotoxins In concentrated form, this product will contain less than 0.1% by weight of any ingredient that has an effect on the human nervous system.

See Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) (www.epa.gov/iriswebp/iris/index.html) and (www.cdc.gov/niosh/87104_48.html)
Propylene Glycol; Acetone; Methyl Ethyl Ketone; Trichoroethtlene; Benzyl Alcohol; Hexylene Glycol; Propylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether; Toluene; Cyclohexanol; n-hexane; Diethylene Glycol Monoethyl Ether; Diethylene Glycol Monobutyl Ether; Perchloroethylene; Xylene; Butozy Propanol; Naptha; Stoddard Solvent; Ethyl Alcohol; Isopropyl Alcohol; Ammonia
G.3 Flammability In concentrated form, this product will have a flash point of 140’F or higher. The lowest flash point for any individual ingredient within the product must be less than 5% of the concentrated product.
See OSHA Regulations (29 CFR) Hazard Communication – 1910.1200. Or Pensky-Martens Closed Tester (ASTM Z11.24-1979 (ASTM D 56-79 for liquids. OSHA Class II and Class I (Combustible) liquids with a flashpoint above 100F and below 140F.
G.4 Corrosivity (pH) In its contracted form, this product must have a pH of grater than 2.0 and less than 12.5.
See EPA Standard Method 9040B: pH SW-846 EPA Standard Method 940B
G.5 Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) In its diluted form, this product must have a VOC content equal or less than the label specified percentage.
See California Air Resource Board method 310: (www.arb.ca.gov/testmeth/cptm/es_05.pfd)
VOC content of greater than 1% by weight at the diluted use point. Air Freshener-Room Deodorant (Liquid) greater than 18%- Gel at greater than 3%; General Purpose Cleaner greater than 4%; Glass Cleaner at greater than 4%; all other products at greater than 10%.
G.6 Endocrine Disrupters In its contracted form, this product must contain a combined total of less than 0.1% by weight of any ingredient that is known or suspected as an Endocrine Disrupter on its MSDS or label materials.

See State of Washington C11399 for Environmentally Preferable Products Dibutyl Phthalates; 4-Nonyphenoxy Ethanol; p-Octylphenol diethoxylate; Octylphenol ethoxylate; Octylphenol; Tetramenthylbutyl)phenoxy ethanol; p-tert-octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol; Dodecyphenol Ethoxylates; Nonylphenol Polyethylene Oxide; Nonylphenol-9; C9 Branded Alkylphenol Ethoxylate; C8 Branded Alkylphenol Ethoxylate; Octylphenoxypoly (ethoxyethanol); Nonylphenol Monoethoxylate.
G.7 Aerosol Container No pressurized products may be used.
No Reference No aerosol products are acceptable.
G.8 Eye Irritation In its concentrated form, this product must have an eye irritation core of Category IV (Mild) per the EPA scale or Green Seal GS-37.
See OPPTS Toxicology Standards: (www.epa.gov/opptsfrs/OPPTS_Harmonized/870_Health_Effects_Test_Guidlines/Series)
In concentrated form, a weighted average of any ingredient above 1% with a “Warning or Caution” label. Any eye irritation rating of more then III.II or I per the EPA scale
G.9 Skin Absorption Individual ingredients or products exhibiting less than 1% of the Prohibited chemicals noted.
See OPPTS Toxicology Standards: (www.epa.gov/opptsfrs/OPPTS_Harmonized/870_Health_Effects_Test_Guidlines/Series)
Isopropanol; 2-butoxyethanol; Acetone; 1,1,1-TCE; Napthalene; Ethylene glycol; Diethylene Glycol Monobutyl Ether; Tetrachloroethylene; Monoethanolamine; Xylene.
G.10 Volatile Organic Chemicals (VOC’s) In diluted form, this product shall contain no more than 50% of the allowable VOC content specified.
See California Air Resources Board Method (www.arb.ca.gov.testmeth/cptm/es_05.pfd)
Any product that exceeds 100% of its allowable VOC content.
G.11 Phosphates (Eutrophication) In diluted form, this product shall contain no more than 0.5% phosphorous by weight.
See EPA 600/R97/072 (www.epa.gov/cgi-bin/claritgw) at “phosphorus test or 600R97072” Any product that contain more than 0.5% phosphorous by weight.
G.12 Toxicity
(Oral LD50) In concentrated form, as a whole or on a weighted average of LD50’s for each ingredient of the product is equal to 1% or more by weight, is greater than 2,000 mg/kg. Alternatively, that the product as a whole meets Level 1 acute oral toxicity (LD>5,000 mg/kg),
See OPPTS harmonized test guidelines: (www.epa.gov/docs/OPPTS_Harmonized/870_Health_Effects_Test_Guidelines/Series/870-1100.pfd)
The absence of acute oral toxicity test data, an authoritive Certification, LD50 test report or clear MSDS clarification.
G.13 Toxicity
Aquatic Not toxic to aquatic life, for chemicals containing < 1% disinfectant properties..
See EPA Environmental Effects Testing Guidelines: www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/cfrhtml_00/Tile_40/40cfr797_00.html) .
A cleaner that contains greater than 1% of any added disinfectant ingredient or more than 5% organic mater for a combined disinfectant/cleaner..
G.14 Biodegradability In its concentrated form, each ingredient as a whole (or any ingredient comprising 5% or more) meets the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)criteria for biodegradability.
See (www.iso.org/iso/en/StandardsQueryForm)
5% or less of the product is biodegradable. Does not meet the requirements of Green Seal GS-37
G.15 Fragrances The product, in part or as a whole in a concentrated form contains a combined total of 1% or less of any non-functional fragrance ingredient; or SARA 313 listed hazardous materials.
See(www.pa.gov/tri/chemical/chemlist2001.pfd)
A product that contains a combined total of more than 1% of any non-functional fragrance ingredient; or SARA 313 listed hazardous materials.
G.16 Dyes The product, in part or as a whole in a concentrated form contains a combined total of 1% or less of any coloring agent that are non-functional; or SARA 313 listed hazardous materials.
See(www.pa.gov/tri/chemical/chemlist2001.pfd)
A product that contains a combined total of more than 1% of any dyes that are non-functional; or SARA 313 listed hazardous materials.
G.17 Concentrates A product that requires the addition of water prior to use. A product that includes all water needed for effective use or requires no addition of water prior to use.
G.18 Recyclable Packaging All containers are made with materials that are reusable, recyclable or returnable. Some or all containers are not made with materials that are reusable, recyclable or returnable.
G.19 Chemical Free Chemical Free Cleaning products will leave no chemical residual in the air or on any surface after the cleaning activity.

See “Chemical Free Cleaning Chemical Guideline” Product leaves a chemical residue in the air and/or on a surface.

Material Safety Data Sheets
SERVICE PROVIDER will submit Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) on all products within ten (10) working days prior to contract start-up, in a form acceptable to the designated CLIENT representative(s). Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) must be displayed for all chemicals and supplies used.


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating consumable office products?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for consumable office products:

Our guidelines for wood and paper products include:

- Are recycled materials used in the product? If so, what percentage?
- What percentage of post-consumer materials is used? If wood is used in the product, what is its source and how is it harvested?
- Is the product manufactured from tropical rainforest wood?

See Sustainable Purchasing Policy attached


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating furniture and furnishings?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for furniture and furnishings:
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Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating Information technology (IT) and equipment?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for Information Technology (IT) and equipment:

EPEAT and Energy Star certifications....see Sustainable Purchasing Policy attached in earlier section.
2020 purchases are EPEAT Silver rated.
Starting in 2021 purchases will be EPEAT Gold.


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating food service providers?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for food service providers:

3. Section 5.25 (SUSTAINABILITY) of the Agreement is hereby amended to include the following new third paragraph: CONTRACTOR shall support UNIVERSITY’S Real Food Challenge commitment, which pledges that UNIVERSITY will purchase a minimum of Twenty Percent (20%) “Real Food” annually by 2020. CONTRACTOR’S responsibilities shall include but are not limited to the following: i. Identify a designated manager/administrator to serve as lead to UNIVERSITY’S Real Food Challenge Working Group and CONTRACTOR staff, and as a liaison to suppliers. ii. Provide ongoing collaboration with UNIVERSITY’S Real Food Challenge Working Group to meet or exceed UNIVERSITY’S “Real Food” target and timeline. iii. Provide proactive development and implementation of a food acquisition plan to meet the Real Food Challenge goals in concert with UNIVERSITY’S Real Food Challenge Working Group and others at UNIVERSITY. iv. Provide food purchase invoices in digital format to Real Food Challenge personnel for ease of use in operating the Real Food Challenge calculator. v. Collaborate with UNIVERSITY’S Real Food Challenge Working Group on vendor and customer education and marketing. vi. Engage in proactive negotiations with suppliers to ensure they will work to meet or exceed UNIVERSITY’S goal of 20% “Real Food” annually by 2020.
https://sustainability.lehigh.edu/real-food-challenge


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating garments and linens?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for garments and linens:
---

Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating professional service providers?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for professional service providers:

A/E services are tied to construction projects therefore sustainability criteria and knowledge vary depending on type of project. In all cases, sustainability knowledge and experience are one of the criteria which A/E services are evaluated. Large renovations and new construction must be certified as LEED Silver or higher.


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating transportation and fuels?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for transportation and fuels:

Not a published criteria. Needs are determined on a case by case basis of each purchase/need. For example, we have recently purchased an electric bus and an electric car and are installing charging stations in strategic areas on campus.


Website URL where information about the institution’s sustainable procurement program or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:

Sustainable procurement efforts were not impacted by COVID-19 and therefore are representative of a normal year.

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.