Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 78.07
Liaison Cary Gaunt
Submission Date March 4, 2021

STARS v2.2

Keene State College
AC-2: Learning Outcomes

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 8.00 / 8.00 Cary Gaunt
Director of Campus Sustainability
Sustainability
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Has the institution adopted one or more sustainability learning outcomes that apply to the entire student body or, at minimum, to the institution's predominant student body?:
Yes

Which of the following best describes the sustainability learning outcomes?:
Sustainability-focused

A list of the institution level sustainability learning outcomes:

Keene State College (KSC) has six Collegewide Learning Outcomes; FOUR are directly related to sustainability with one emphatically focused on sustainability education and co-curricular learning. These four are:
1) Sustainability: Keene State College students will explore their place in interconnected natural and human systems; evaluate the personal, social, and environmental impacts of their choices; and apply their knowledge and skills for building a just, resilient, and thriving world.
2) Civic Engagement: Keene State College students will demonstrate knowledge of one or more social or environmental issues including relevant cultural, political and policy contexts; take action individually or collectively to address issues; and reflect on the ethical dimensions of civic engagement.
3) Commitment to Well-Being: Keene State College students will reflect critically on their own well-being and that of the larger world, demonstrate knowledge of issues that impact health and wellness, advocate for themselves, and commit to one or more practices that promote well-being.
4) Intercultural Competence: Keene State College students will reflect critically on their own culture and on the intersectionality of culture and social location, demonstrate knowledge of a diversity of cultures, and communicate effectively with people from a variety of backgrounds.
The remaining two CWLOs address critical thinking and creative inquiry.
As you can see from the four sustainability focused CWLOs, KSC places a premium on education that emphasizes sustainability from myriad perspectives, including systems thinking, understanding place, civic engagement for environmental topics, the connection between personal and planetary well-being, and diversity and multiculturalism.
Furthermore, the College's Program Manager for Academic Affairs, who advises implementation and tracking for all of KSC's Collegewide Learning Outcomes, suggests that all the CWLOs address sustainability in some capacity since for "so many of our students creative inquiry is expressed via sustainability issues and critical thinking is necessary to manage wicked problems." Keene State's work with the CWLOs clearly shows that they are much more powerful at the intersections. The College's annual Academic Excellence Conference demonstrates the intersectionality of Collegewide Learning Outcomes (See: https://www.keene.edu/academics/enrichment/aec/). A full list of the CWLOs is found at:
https://www.keene.edu/academics/liberal-arts/outcomes/.
Sustainability Learning Outcomes also are covered by KSC's Integrative Studies Program requirements for each student: https://www.keene.edu/academics/isp/ AND in the First Year Experience courses that specifically ensures that each entering first year student has immersion in all the CWLOs. As a result of the Collegewide Learning Outcomes, each Division is developing, or already has developed specific Learning Outcomes to meet the objectives of the CWLO.


Total number of graduates from degree programs:
801

Number of graduates from degree programs that require an understanding of the concept of sustainability:
318

A brief description of how the figure above was determined:

BACKGROUND
The following background explains the context of sustainability-focused learning outcomes at Keene State College (KSC). This Background section is followed by a Methodology section that specifically explains how the figures were determined.
KSC emphasizes Collegewide Learning Outcomes across the curriculum. As described in Part 1, KSC approved a suite of Collegewide Learning Outcomes, including a Sustainability Collegewide Learning Outcome, and learning outcomes that address sustainability, the interdependence of human and natural environments, and/or a sustainability challenge. The intention of KSC's Collegewide Learning Outcomes is that they inform curriculum at all levels, including what is taught in all programs of study (whether new courses and/or modules within courses). The Collegewide Learning Outcomes affect "education across the curriculum" and have had a significant influence on Departmental offerings. In addition, KSC is located in a city and region that emphasize sustainability and climate responsibility. Therefore, KSC has a high number of degree programs that meet the criteria of this section due to the influence of place and Collegewide Learning Outcomes. Given how the curriculum has changed because of the Collegewide Learning Outcomes (e.g., development of a required First Year course that addresses all the Learning Outcomes, revision of the required Integrated Studies Program to address all Learning Outcomes), it is not unreasonable to say that all students at KSC have exposure to the concept of sustainability through their education. However, KSC adopted a narrower methodology to complete Part 2 as defined below.
METHODOLOGY
To develop the Part 2 summaries, and avoid confusion with Part 1, KSC is applying a narrower lens and including information only on the most overt sustainability-focused programs. The document provided in "Additional Documentation to Support the Submission" provides the raw data results. We identified the number of graduates for each program using the KSC annual Fact Books, using a three-year average, according to the above-state criteria:
First, SUSTAINABILITY-FOCUSED PROGRAMS
Eight majors (Note: Does not include sustainability studies, which is a new B.S. introduced in the fall of 2019): Architecture, Environmental Studies, Geography, Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Safety, Occupational Health Applied Sciences
Second, MAJORS THAT ADOPTED SUSTAINABILITY-FOCUSED LEARNING OUTCOMES
Three programs: Biology, Chemistry, Spanish
THIRD, REQUIRE A SUSTAINABILITY FOCUSED COURSE
Construction Management.
We tallied these results to determine the number of graduates from degree programs that require an understanding of the concept of sustainability. This is an undercount because all students take the First Year experience and Integrated Studies Program courses that address all Collegewide Learning Outcomes (including sustainability) and does not represent that the majority of degree programs include myriad sustainability-focused courses. The Excel spreadsheet described in the next section and provided as "Documentation supporting the figure..." provides a listing of the broader number of Programs that address sustainability.

ADDITIONAL BACKGROUND INFORMATION:
The intention of the Keene State College Collegewide Learning Outcomes is that they inform education throughout the curriculum and in co-curricular activities. Each of the 6 Collegewide Learning Outcomes has a Subcommittee that focuses on how to implement and measure the efficacy of the specific CWLO. Each Subcommittee is charged with developing a competency matrix that identifies the desired competencies for each year the students are enrolled at KSC. In this way it is accurate to say that "every student will graduate from a degree program that require an understanding of the concept of sustainability." Sustainability, like the other five Collegewide Learning Outcomes, is integrated throughout the curriculum. Keene State College organizes its curriculum around its six Collegewide Learning Outcomes with the expectation that departments and courses integrate them into their teaching so that all students graduate with competency in all CWLOs. Furthermore, KSC developed an Integrative Studies Program (ISP) that all students must take as part of their overall education. The ISP is "designed to develop intellectual skills and understanding across the arts, the
humanities, the social sciences, and the natural sciences." One central pathway of the ISP is understanding sustainability topics from these various dimensions. The ISP offers specific pathways for integration with the KSC CWLOs by including specific courses that address sustainability, civic engagement, well-being, and intercultural competence. The ISP overview indicates how this program offers a holistic approach to sustainability education: "Writing is not approached as an exercise, but as a way of communicating with clarity and purpose. Quantitative analysis is not done in a workbook, but as a way of understanding and solving real-world problems. Courses such as Angels and Fallen Women, Black Music Blues Nation, The Downside of Certainty, Why We Create, Measuring Fair Trade, The No-Impact Experiment, or Numbers from Wall Street inspire students to conduct research, think critically, reason quantitatively, write effectively, and imagine innovative connections across disciplinary boundaries." (See https://www.keene.edu/academics/isp/overview/).


A list of degree programs that require an understanding of the concept of sustainability:

The following Majors (which also offer opportunities for minors) emphasize sustainability-focused learning outcomes:
1. Architecture (Green Design and Building focus)
2. Environmental Studies
3. Geography
4. Holocaust and Genocide Studies
5. Safety, Occupational Health Applied Sciences
6. Sustainable Product Design and Innovation
7. Public Health
8. Women's and Gender Studies.
In addition to these Majors, there are 46 Majors and Minors that include sustainability learning outcomes as part of their overall learning outcomes. Learn more about the specific learning outcomes at: http://www.keene.edu/academics/programs/ and in the Excel spreadsheet included in "Documentation supporting the figure reported above."
As described in Part 1, Keene State College approved a suite of Collegewide Learning Outcomes, including a Sustainability Collegewide Learning Outcome, and learning outcomes that address sustainability, the interdependence of human and natural environments, and/or a sustainability challenge. The intention of KSC's Collegewide Learning Outcomes is that they inform curriculum at all levels, including what is taught in all programs of study (whether new courses and/or modules within courses). The Collegewide Learning Outcomes affect "education across the curriculum;" therefore, KSC has a high number of degree programs that meet the criteria of this section.


Documentation supporting the figure reported above (upload):
Do the figures reported above cover one, two, or three academic years?:
Three

Percentage of students who graduate from programs that require an understanding of the concept of sustainability:
39.70

Website URL where information about the sustainability learning outcomes is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:

The KSC Sustainability Major (B.S.) and Minor are new since KSC's last AASHE submission and are the direct result of the Collegewide Learning Outcome for Sustainability. The specific program objectives and learning outcomes for the Sustainability Major and Minor are:
Program Objectives and/or Learning Outcomes:
1. Inquiry: Use appropriate methods and technique to pose and answer questions about sustainability.
2. Knowledge: Characterize sustainability challenges using integrated knowledge of human and nature systems.
3. Knowledge: Understand the basic sustainability concepts of homeostasis, carrying-capacity, cradle-to-grave recycling, evolutionary processes, inter-generational debt, social adaptation, climate change, ecosystem services, and environmental justice.
4. Perspective-taking: Characterize sustainability challenges from multiple value and interest perspectives.
5. Articulate a comprehensive world view that integrates diverse approaches to sustainability.
6. Collaborative competency: Work effectively with others to achieve a goal.
7. Justice: Analyze the role of environmental sustainability in the promotion of comprehensive justice and equity
8. Problem-solving: Use skills, knowledge, perspective-taking, and collaborative competences to solve a sustainability challenge.

Syllabus statements that address sustainability can be found at: https://library.keene.edu/fe-resources/syllabus

Data sources include:
Institutional Research and Assessment Keene State College Fact Book for 2019-2020, 2018-2019, and 2017-2018 (https://www.keene.edu/ksc/assets/files/10346/factbook2019.pdf)
Integrative Studies Program: https://www.keene.edu/academics/isp/
Collegewide Learning Outcomes (http://www.keene.edu/academics/liberal-arts/outcomes/)
The Keene State College web site (http://www.keene.edu/academics/) and the web sites of individual departments.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON ACADEMIC PROGRAM OUTCOMES not provided in the Excel Spreadsheet Documentation is provided below:
Business Management, BS
Business Management, Minor

Overall Management BS and Minor curriculum proposals over three cycles (2010, 2013, 2018 list outcomes as “on file” or “no change” I do not have records that go back far enough to find the outcomes.

Entrepreneurship: With the Entrepreneurship specialization, students will study via project based learning how to design and development products and services. By its very nature entrepreneurship is a multi-faceted field. Therefore, multiple perspectives and methods will undergird the teaching and learning about entrepreneurship. These include a triple bottom line perspective which encourages respect and attention for economic development at the community level. Life cycle analysis will help students understand the dynamics of product/service evolution over time. Finally, students will develop a product or service outlined in a detailed business plan created individually or in teams. Students will also learn and be encouraged to consider B-corporations that include positive impacts on society, workers, the community, as well as employee stock ownership plans (ESOPs) in which business owners and employees own shares in the company. The list of electives enables the student to enrich their expertise in many areas from conceptualization stage via an art/drawing class to critical aspects of marketing, negotiations, as well as the larger implications for society.

Campaigns and Elections, Minor

This minor will provide background to prepare students for possible volunteer or career-track work in consulting or campaigns. Skill and content emphases would vary depending on the courses a student selects. However, students will be able to learn about elections, voters, and their behavior; presentation and marketing of a candidate or political issue; principles of communication, persuasion, and decision-making; geographic and other population data and its collection and use; and considerations including budgeting, goal setting, and team building associated with an organization of business.

Certificate in American History Archives, GC
Certificate in European History Archives, GC

Learning Outcomes for both Graduate Certificate Programs:

• Students will demonstrate graduate-level, advanced content proficiency in either European or American history.
• Students will demonstrate proficiency in evaluating the literature, theories, and methods of areas of scholarship within these two fields.
• Students will demonstrate essential contextual knowledge of the sociocultural factors shaping archival records as they are created and managed over time in different communities of practice and localities.
• Students will formulate historical arguments and communicate those arguments in clear and persuasive prose.
• Students will demonstrate mastery of the knowledge and skills involved in historical practice by conceptualizing and executing a significant piece of original research in either European or American history.

Computer Science, BA

1. Students will demonstrate software development skills in at least one computer programming language through the commonly accepted level of data structures.
2. Students will demonstrate understanding of fundamental data structures and algorithms.
3. Students will demonstrate an introductory understanding of computer architecture and/or operating systems other than Microsoft Windows (currently Linux, Unix or iSeries).
4. Students will demonstrate understanding in fundamental mathematical concepts in order to be competent computer scientists
5. Students will demonstrate technical skills in completing mathematical processes.
6. Students will demonstrate software development skills in at least one other computer programming language not taught in item 1 above.

Construction Management, Minor

The Minor in Construction Management is an interdisciplinary program grounded in discipline-based workforce development and the liberal arts. It is comprised of core courses drawn from Architecture, Business Management, Construction Management and Safety. This program prepares students for life and work with a focus on a career in the construction industry.
In this program, students will learn how to design, manage and safely execute construction projects from conception through completion. This requires the development of an array of technical, managerial, collaboration, teamwork, critical thinking and¬ problem-solving skills and knowledge that are consistent with College-Wide Learning Outcomes.
At the completion of this program, graduates will be able to:

 Demonstrate an understanding and apply key concepts in construction management, for example, architectural design, construction management processes and methods, materials selection, planning, estimating, scheduling, construction law and contract administration, project management, accident prevention, health and safety standards, and risk management.
 Demonstrate an understanding of fundamental concepts of effective supervision of personnel and the dynamics of organizational theory and behavior.
 Utilize relevant technology and software for construction design and graphics and project management, for example, architectural rendering, graphic and computer aided drafting (CAD) applications and project management software.
 Have explored pathways for career and/or advanced education in construction management related fields.

Construction Management, BS

The B.S. in Construction Management is an interdisciplinary program grounded in discipline-based workforce development and the liberal arts. It is comprised of core courses drawn from Architecture, Business Management, Construction Management and Safety with additional ISP courses in Communication, Math and Physics. This program prepares students for life and work with a focus on a career in the construction industry. It specifically prepares students for a leadership role in the design/build process as a Construction Manager.

In this program, students will learn how to design, manage and safely execute construction projects from conception through completion. This requires the development of an array of technical, managerial, collaboration, teamwork, critical thinking and¬ problem-solving skills and knowledge that are consistent with College-Wide Learning Outcomes. In this program students will learn and be able to apply the principles and best practices of architectural design, construction methods, sustainable construction, engineering fundamentals, construction graphics, selection of materials, estimating, budgeting, cost control, scheduling, project management, supervision of people, risk management, construction safety standards, and professional ethics.

To earn this degree the student must:
 Complete the Integrated Studies requirements
 Complete the requirements of the Major (core and allied courses)
 Select and complete one of the three program Options.

At the completion of this program, graduates will be able to:
 Understand and apply key concepts in construction management, for example, architectural design, construction management processes and methods, materials selection, planning, estimating, scheduling, construction law and contract administration, project management, accident prevention, health and safety standards, and risk management.
 Be able to problem-solve, conceptualize, plan for, make sound judgements about, organize, manage, control and execute complex construction management projects while considering environmental, social and economic impacts.
 Understand fundamental concepts of effective supervision of personnel and the dynamics of organizational theory and behavior.
 Utilize relevant technology and software for construction design and graphics and project management, for example, architectural rendering, graphic and computer aided drafting (CAD) applications and project management software.
 Make effective visual and oral presentations.
 Understand the expectations and ethics for professionals in the construction management industry.
 Have explored pathways for career and/or advanced education in construction management related fields.

Construction Safety Sciences, BS

This major prepares students for a variety of occupational safety and health program management positions in the private and public construction sector. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking, hazard identification and prioritization, problem solving, cost effectiveness, professional skills in programmatic management, and safety and environmental regulatory compliance. Graduates will have the capacity to pursue graduate study or transition directly into careers in loss control, risk management, organizational safety, and consulting.

Construction Safety Sciences, Minor

• Utilize and apply research and evidence to drive problem-solving and integrate value added practical solutions into organizational goals.

• Participate in and contribute to the process of conserving assets and earning powers of an organization by managing risk.

• Gather and use applicable information & technology to communicate, manage knowledge, mitigate risk and support decision-making.

• Establish workplace programs and worker safety/health advocacy practices in a moral, legal, ethical and socially responsible manner.

Data Analytics, Minor

Students completing the minor will gain introductory data analytics skills, including a basic understanding of statistical testing, computer programming and the ability to explore and analyze concepts. The elective courses provide an opportunity to apply the skills in a specific area of interest.

1. Analyze data, test claims and draw valid conclusions using appropriate statistical methodology
2. Recognize relationships between data and specific areas of practice such as biology, business, economics, criminal justice, etc.
3. Retrieve, organize and visualize data using a variety of analytical tools
4. Recognize patterns, ask intelligent questions and generate insights from different data sets
5. Tell the story with the data - visually, orally, and in writing
6. Develop students’ data analytic identity by creating their data analytics portfolio and experiences using present day tools

Engineering Transfer

Unsure who the steward of this program might be? No outcomes on file

Financial Economics, Minor

The student who graduates with a minor in financial economics will gain
• Knowledge and understanding of the macroeconomic and microeconomic principles underlying various types of financial markets and instruments
• Knowledge of fundamental accounting definitions and principles
• Ability to interpret, manipulate, and analyze financial data, and the ability to conduct research on topics of financial economics.

Geography, BA

Students will be able to:
• Use maps, mental maps, geographic representations, and geospatial technologies
• Analyze spatial organization of people, places, and environments
• Identify physical and human characteristics of places and regions
• Recognize how culture and experience influence people's perceptions of places and regions
• Identify Earth's dynamic physical processes
• Distinguish among the characteristics and spatial distribution of Earth's ecosystems
• Recognize processes, patterns, distribution and functions of human migration and settlement
• Discern forces of global cooperation and conflict
• Comprehend the relationship between humans and the environment
• Analyze resource use and distribution
• Apply geography to interpret the past and present, and to plan for the future

Geoscience, Minor

Students completing this minor should be able, at some level, to, among other things:

Make observations of a rock’s texture, mineralogy, and structure, and from these facts make inferences about the rock’s history and mode of origin, as well as its significance to understanding the larger processes acting within the Earth or on the Earth’s surface.

Make observations of landscape features in the field and on maps and other imagery and infer the processes acting to shape that landscape, as well as their significance to understanding the larger processes of the Earth system.

Utilize topographic maps to visualize Earth’s features, demonstrating an understanding of map projections, map scale, map orientation, and utilizing coordinate systems for plotting of map locations.

Describe the Scientific Theory of Plate Tectonics, provide evidence in its support, and apply it to understanding landform development and the distribution of various resources.

Describe the Scientific Theory of Evolution, provide evidence in its support, and apply it to understanding the history of the Earth and of life.

Demonstrate comprehension of the scale of geologic time, and the rates of changes in the Earth system.

Identify major events in the history of the Earth and describe their impacts on the Earth’s surface, the oceans, the atmosphere, and life.

Describe the Earth’s energy balance (Earth-Sun relationship) and energy re-distribution systems (global atmospheric and ocean circulation patterns, and resulting climate zones, in turn determining of weathering regimes, hydrologic activity, soil types, and biomes).

Describe the Earth as a dynamic system of solid, liquid, gaseous and living components, connected through the cycling of matter and energy, including the concepts of dynamic equilibrium and feedback loops.

Use data to model Earth Systems and predict the response of system components to disturbance, applying the concepts of dynamic equilibrium and feedback loops.

Critique geoscience-related news stories from a scientific perspective.

Evaluate human impact on the Earth system.

Practice how science works via inquiry, observation, verification, reason and critical thinking.

Prepare and interpret visual presentations (maps, graphs, etc…) of relevant earth science data.

German Studies, Minor

Students learn how to read, write, listen, and speak in German beginning in German 101 (IHGer101), and these skills diversify and deepen throughout the program, currently through the intermediate level of language proficiency. Students also begin to learn informal and formal ways of addressing people, which includes the workplace and the education system in Germany. Students learn about German-speaking artists of various fields (e.g., music, painting, literature, filmmaking) and this is often the way they also learn about diversity in German culture. For instance, many refugees and immigrants from various countries have chosen Germany as their new home, and students learn about current multicultural issues in Germany through studying prominent immigrant artists.

Students are expected to demonstrate knowledge of diversity and global issues through the lens of studying German language and cultures. This not only reflects the courses that are part of ISP, but also the entire program.

The interdisciplinary German Studies minor, as proposed here, also guides students to address the first three of the college-wide learning outcomes: critical thinking, creative inquiry, and intercultural competence. One cannot have intercultural competency without knowing the language of the culture they are trying to understand. Language and intersectionality of culture and social location are central aspects of understanding Germany, and German-U.S. relationships in commerce and foreign relations. With Germany host to a variety of cultures in the 21st century, it is not simply another similar western country in comparison to the United States, but one that is strengthened by its multiculturalism and inclusion of people from various underdeveloped as well as war-torn countries.

Students learn critical thinking throughout the program, from IHGER 101 introducing them to the language through reading texts, watching videos and films, and speaking practice, to more advanced levels, where students can apply critical thinking to analyze language in literary and theoretical works. To reach the outcome of language proficiency at an advanced level, a major would be needed, which the College no longer offers. However, students could potentially transfer to the German program at the University of New Hampshire to complete the major and build language proficiency beyond the intermediate level. Students may also study abroad in Germany or Austria.

Students are expected to use creative inquiry and engage in research and creative work in the German program. With more of an interdisciplinary focus, as is proposed here, students could, for instance, combine their skills and learning of film production to a German topic. Students also have opportunities as early as the elementary levels of the German language to engage in research and projects related to their major or interests.

Human Resource Management, Minor

The program objective of the Human Resource Management (HRM) minor is to provide selected course offerings that will assist students from any major in developing an additional area of focus within Human Resource Management that will enrich their academic experience and career opportunities. Students will examine the profession which encompasses a broad range of activities that affect the relationship between an organization and its employees. Students will achieve outcomes in coursework including demonstrating an understanding of subtopics like
- organizational staffing,
- training & development, and
- compensation and employee relations.

Individualized Major

The primary goal of the program is to provide students the opportunity to complete a major that is not offered at the institution. The program seeks to enhance students’ ability to integrate and synthesize content and intellectual skills from two or more academic programs and to meet their educational interests and career aspirations.

Students are required to identify student learning outcomes.

Individualized major requirements must:

• include student learning outcomes that reflect knowledge and intellectual skills that will be demonstrated as a result of completing the major;

Legal Studies, BA

The core objective of this major is to expose students to a range of skills essential for an understanding of law and its role in American and international society, as well as the pursuit of a career in law. Legal Studies students will:
• Develop a definitional understanding of law.
• Understand how law is formed and interpreted, as well as its impact on society and government as a whole.
• Understand the foundational principles of the American Constitution and key current legal disputes related to it.
• Develop skills in logic and critical thinking that are essential for reading and understanding law.
• Become familiar with law as it applies in a variety of academic and professional subfields (international law, constitutional law, security law, criminal and civil law, environmental law, etc.)
• Critically analyze the ethical and moral implications of various legal theories and decisions.
• Develop strong written and oral communication skills.

Marketing Minor

The objective of the Marketing Minor is to provide selected course offerings that will assist students from any major in developing an additional area of focus within Marketing that will enrich their academic experience and career opportunities. Students will examine the profession while exploring a broad range of theories and activities that affect the relationship between an organization, its customers and its markets. Through coursework and assignments students will gain and demonstrate an understanding of the nature and assumptions of
• Product planning.
• Marketing communications and advertising.
• Digital marketing and eCommerce.
• Marketing Analytics and customer data management.
• The behavioral and organizational theories that underly market behavior.

Master of Education
Post BA Teacher Certification
Post Masters Certification

The outcomes for these programs could be embedded on their catalog website but we should consult with Program Chair before moving forward

Nursing, BS

The Nursing Program SLOs provide a framework for the nursing curriculum. Nursing course objectives and learning activities aim to facilitate student achievement of the SLOs. The SLOs are available in the Nursing Program Student Handbook, the Nursing Program Faculty Handbook and on the College website.
At the completion of the program pre-licensure nursing students will:
1. Demonstrate accountability for practicing nursing within established moral, legal, ethical, regulatory, and humanistic principles.
2. Demonstrate an awareness of and responsiveness to the larger context and system of health care and the ability to effectively call on system resources to provide care that is of optimal quality and value.
3. Use information and technology to communicate, manage knowledge, mitigate error, and support decision-making.
4. Identify, evaluate, and use the best current evidence coupled with clinical expertise and consideration of patients' preferences, experience, and values to make practice decisions.
5. Function effectively within nursing and interdisciplinary teams, fostering open communication, mutual respect, shared decision-making, team learning, and development.
6. Minimize risk of harm to patients and providers through both individual performance and system effectiveness.
7. Use data to monitor outcomes and care processes, and use improvement methods to design and test changes to continuously improve the quality and safety of health care.
8. Influence the behavior of individuals or groups of individuals within their environment in a way that will facilitate the establishment and acquisition/achievement of shared goals.
9. Deliver holistic nursing care, advocate for health promotion and disease prevention strategies at the individual, family, community, and global levels.
10. Demonstrate effective communication skills with clients that foster mutual respect and shared decision making to enhance patient satisfaction and health outcomes.

Nutrition, Minor

With the Nutrition minor, students will be able to:
• describe the functions of essential nutrients and identify dietary sources
• evaluate nutrient intake and diet quality
• describe the economic and cultural factors related to food choice
• explain the relationship between food habits, nutritional status, and health and wellness
• discuss, contrast, and evaluate the roles of nutrition and wellness within the processes of pregnancy, lactation, child development, and aging
• recognize and discuss the relationship between nutrition and the prevention of chronic diseases.

Philosophy, Minor

Students will develop skills to:
 Recognize the structure of formal and informal arguments
 Incorporate multiple perspectives when examining an issue
 Create and articulate persuasive arguments in speaking and writing

Politics, BA
Politics, Minor

Citizenship and Disciplinary Objectives in Introductory Political Science (100- and 200-Level)
[S]tudents should receive instruction in the methods of attending to, participating in, and reasoning about the politics that affect them as individuals and as members of communities and states. We identify three sets of skills that well-educated citizens should develop:

1. Effective Awareness. Competence in monitoring political phenomena should be demonstrated by:
—the ability to identify the kinds of political activity that characterize local, state, national, and international politics;
—the ability to identify the sources of information that can be used to track important political behavior; and
—evidence that the student has personally monitored political events.

2. Effective Participation. Competence in political participation should be demonstrated by:
—the ability to identify the varieties of participatory behavior that are available to individuals and to members of any given political community;
—the ability to characterize the likely consequences of each kind of political participation; and
—evidence that the student has personally engaged in political action.

3. Effective Reasoning. Competence in political reasoning should be demonstrated by:
—the ability to engage in political argument that weighs alternative positions on the objectives and methods of political action;
—the development of conclusions that are logically consistent with a specific set of objectives and methods; and
—evidence that the student can evaluate and integrate personal political values and available public choices.

Disciplinary Objectives in Intermediate Political Research and Analysis (200- and 300-Level)
[S]tudents should gain practice in the skills identified above and receive instruction in political research that contributes to the following objectives.

1. Effective Political Research. Student competence in research on political phenomena should be demonstrated by:
—representativeness in the use of print and electronic resources on politics, such that students both consult and build on classic and current political analysis of the problem under consideration, following guidelines that will be provided by the individual course instructor; and
—depth in the exploration of power relations that are fundamental to the problem under consideration, following guidelines that will be provided by the individual course instructor.

2. Effective Political Analysis. Student competence in the evaluation of political behavior, data, and text should be demonstrated by:
—focus, in that it defines a political problem explicitly and stays on topic;
—thoroughness, in that it explores a range of political issues and politically relevant data that accurately represent the scope of the problem at hand;
—fairness, in that it explicitly considers and critiques at least two of the significant competing perspectives that bear on the problem at hand; and
—conclusiveness, in that it offers a judgment that builds on data and perspectives treated in the course of the analysis.

Objectives for the Advanced Political Science (400-Level)
[S]tudents should demonstrate that they can integrate and apply the entire range of foregoing skills. The focus of this demonstration is to provide an opportunity for students to show how awareness, participation, reasoning, research, and analysis draw upon skills that can be applied synergistically to a political problem of particular interest to the student

Our goals also include the provision of political science content that students at a liberal arts college should be able to study. These areas, as listed in the 2007 proposal, include: US politics, public administration, public policy, global politics, comparative politics, and political thought.

Finally, our program assumes responsibility for the general education of KSC students. As described in the 2007 proposal:

[W]ork in the Political Science major will contribute to all eight broad categories of skill that the Integrative Studies Program has identified as potential emphases of courses that participate in the program:
• reading;
• writing;
• information literacy;
ethical reasoning;
• critical thinking;
• creative thinking;
• critical dialogue;
• technological fluency; and
• quantitative reasoning.

Professional Writing Minor

Consistent with professional writing programs across the country, this course of study would benefit students in multiple majors as they prepare to enter the workforce, become entrepreneurs, and as they participate in civic service through their work with nonprofit organizations. The interdisciplinary set of courses available in this minor help students to see the importance of integrating writing, design, and research in writing for workplaces and the community.

• Become familiar with expectations and types of professional and workplace writing.
• Identify and analyze the audience and purpose for writing situations and draft and design needed documents accordingly.
• Communicate information accurately and efficiently through various types of documents.
• Create effective oral presentations, applying professional writing principles.
• Incorporate visuals effectively to enhance the communication of ideas and concepts.
• Conduct usability testing to test the effectiveness of documents with the target audience(s).
• Collaborate with a writing team to successfully complete projects.
• Demonstrate an understanding of key concepts in professional writing: context, purpose, audience, genre, usability, visual rhetoric.

Public Health Nutrition, MS

Our program outcomes are in alignment with the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics standards in order to prepare those who wish to practice public health nutrition. By completion of the MS in Public Health Nutrition graduates should be able to:

● Assess nutrition problems and needs of the population,
● Monitor nutritional status of populations and related systems of care, and process information back into the assessment functions
● Develop policies, programs, and activities that address highest priority nutritional problems and needs
● Implement effective nutrition strategies
● Lead communities in identifying nutrition-related needs
● Plan, direct, and evaluate health promotion and disease prevention efforts
● Administer and manage programs, including supervising personnel
● Develop a budget for a health promotion program
● Identify and seek resources (e.g., grants, contracts) to support programs and services
● Collaborate with others to promote environmental and systems changes

Public Health Nutrition with Dietetic Internship, MS

According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics House of Delegates Public Health and Community Nutrition Task Force, registered dietitian nutritionists who wish to specialize in public health and community nutrition settings need to be adequately trained in the following areas:

Core Public Health Functions1
• Assessing the nutrition problems and needs of the population, monitoring the nutritional status of populations and related systems of care, and processing information back into the assessment functions
• Develop policies, programs, and activities that address highest priority nutritional problems and needs
• Assuring the implementation of effective nutrition strategies

The main functions of public health nutritionists include1:
• taking a leadership role in identifying nutrition-related needs of a community;
• planning, directing, and evaluating health promotion and disease prevention efforts;
• administering and managing programs, including supervising personnel;
• developing and/or assisting in the preparation of a budget;
• identifying and seeking resources (e.g., grants, contracts) to support programs and services;
• collaborating with others to promote environmental and systems changes;
• assuring access to healthful and affordable food and nutrition-related care;
• advocating for and participating in policy development and evaluation of the impacts and outcomes; and,
• participating in research, demonstration and evaluation projects.

1. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (2012) HOD Backgrounder: Public Health Nutrition. Chicago, IL: Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics House of Delegates.

In addition to core public health functions, the following competencies set forth by Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) must be met for accreditation purposes:

CRDN 1.1: Select indicators of program quality and/or measure achievement of objectives
CRDN 1.3: Justify programs, products, services and care using appropriate evidence or data
CRDN 1.4: Evaluate emerging research for application in nutrition and dietetics practice
CRDN 1.5: Conduct projects using appropriate research methods, ethical procedures and data analysis
CRDN 1.6: Incorporate critical-thinking skills in overall practice
CRDN 2.1: Practice in compliance with current federal regulations and state statutes and rules, as applicable and in accordance with accreditation standards and the Scope of Dietetics Practice and Code of Ethics for the Profession of Nutrition and Dietetics
CRDN 2.2: Demonstrate professional writing skills in preparing professional communications
CRDN 2.3: Demonstrate active participation, teamwork and contributions in group settings
CRDN 2.4: Function as a member of interprofessional teams
CRDN 2.5: Assign duties to NDTRs and/or support personnel as appropriate
CRDN 2.6: Refer clients and patients to other professionals and services when needs are beyond individual scope of practice
CRDN 2.7: Apply leadership principles effectively to achieve desired outcomes
CRDN 2.8: Demonstrate negotiation skills
CRDN 2.9: Participate in professional and community organizations
CRDN 2.10: Demonstrate professional attributes in all areas of practice
CRDN 2.11: Show cultural competence/sensitivity in interactions with clients, colleagues and staff
CRDN 2.12: Perform self-assessment; develop goals for self-improvement throughout the program
CRDN 2.13: Prepare a plan for professional development according to Commission on Dietetic Registration guidelines
CRDN 2.14: Demonstrate advocacy on local, state, or national legislative and regulatory issues or policies impacting the nutrition and dietetics profession
CRDN 2.15: Practice and/or role play mentoring and precepting others
CRDN 3.1: Perform the Nutrition Care Process and use standardized nutrition language for individuals, groups and populations of differing ages and health status, in a variety of settings
CRDN 3.2: Conduct nutrition focused physical exams
CRDN 3.3: Demonstrate effective communications skills for clinical and customer service in a variety of formats
CRDN 3.4: Design, implement and evaluate presentations to a target audience
CRDN 3.5: Develop nutrition education materials that are culturally and age appropriate and designed for the literacy level of the audience
CRDN 3.6: Use effective education and counseling skills to facilitate behavior change
CRDN 3.7: Develop and deliver products, programs or services that promote consumer health, wellness and lifestyle management
CRDN 3.8: Deliver respectful, science-based answers to consumer questions on emerging trends
CRDN 3.9: Coordinate procurement, production, distribution and service of goods and services promoting the responsible use of resources
CRDN 3.10: Develop and evaluate recipes, formulas and menus for acceptability and affordability that accommodates the cultural diversity and health needs of various populations, groups and individual
CRDN 4.1: Participate in management of human resources
CRDN 4.2: Perform management functions related to safety, security and sanitation that affect employees, customers, patients, facilities and food
CRDN 4.3: Conduct clinical and customer service quality management activities
CRDN 4.4: Apply current nutrition informatics to develop, store, retrieve and disseminate information and data
CRDN 4.5: Analyze quality, financial or productivity data to use in planning
CRDN 4.6: Propose and use procedures as appropriate to the practice setting to promote sustainability, reduce waste and protect the environment
CRDN 4.7: Conduct feasibility studies for products, programs or services with consideration of and benefits
CRDN 4.8: Develop a plan to provide or develop a product, program or service that includes a budget, staffing needs, equipment and supplies
CRDN 4.9: Explain the process for coding and billing for nutrition and dietetics services to obtain reimbursement from public or private payers, fee-for-service and value-based payment systems
CRDN 4.10: Analyze risk in nutrition and dietetics practice

SOHAS, Minor

This major prepares students for a variety of occupational safety and health program management positions in the private and public sector. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking, hazard identification and prioritization, problem solving, cost effectiveness, professional skills in programmatic management, and safety and environmental regulatory compliance. Graduates will have the capacity to pursue graduate study, participate in applied research, or transition directly into careers in loss control, risk management, organizational safety, and consulting.

Sports and Exercise Psychology, Minor

Students who complete the Sport & Exercise Psychology Minor will be able to;
• Describe complex relationships between behavior, personal characteristics and social, cultural, economic and physical environments in the content of exercise and sport
• Explain the effects of exercise and sport participation on mood, cognition and self-concept
• Explain the importance of physical activity in health promotion and recognize individual differences in motivation for exercise and sport
• Apply evidence-based theories of motivation to increase physical activity in a variety of settings
• Describe the effect of arousal/stress/anxiety on sport performance and suggest strategies for reducing performance anxiety
• Assess different aspects of motivation, attentional focus, anxiety, biofeedback and personality as they relate to exercise and sport

Sports Management, Minor

The sport management complements existing programming across the campus and helps to attract new students who seek to vary and develop their skill sets and optimize their career potential. Students who successfully complete the Sport Management minor should be able to:
• demonstrate an understanding of the principles and theories underlying the management of organizational activities such as planning, organizing, leading, controlling and decision making;
• gain an understanding of the analysis and reporting of accounting information;
• demonstrate and critically apply psychological and sociological sport theories using a variety of discipline-specific observational tools to evaluate real-world sporting event competitions; and
• identify key issues and responsibilities in the management of sports and apply discipline-specific theories to solve sport-related problems.

Sustainability, Minor

Upon completion of this minor, students will be able to:
• Explain local, national, and global sustainability using a multidisciplinary approach
• Incorporate sustainability principles within their personal and professional values and practices
• Integrate sustainability concepts such as systems thinking, ethics, social justice, and collaborative problem solving
• Apply critical thinking skills to provide sustainable solutions and build resilient communities

Sustainability, BS

1. Inquiry: Use appropriate methods and technique to pose and answer questions about sustainability.
2. Knowledge: Characterize sustainability challenges using integrated knowledge of human and nature systems.
3. Knowledge: Understand the basic sustainability concepts of homeostasis, carrying-capacity, cradle-to-grave recycling, evolutionary processes, inter-generational debt, social adaptation, climate change, ecosystem services, and environmental justice.
4. Perspective-taking: Characterize sustainability challenges from multiple value and interest perspectives.
5. Articulate a comprehensive world view that integrates diverse approaches to sustainability.
6. Collaborative competency: Work effectively with others to achieve a goal.
7. Justice: Analyze the role of environmental sustainability in the promotion of comprehensive justice and equity
8. Problem-solving: Use skills, knowledge, perspective-taking, and collaborative competences to solve a sustainability challenge.

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.