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Submission Date May 14, 2015
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Juniata College
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Figures required to calculate the percentage of courses with sustainability content::
Undergraduate Graduate
Total number of courses offered by the institution 1,100 0
Number of sustainability courses offered 12 0
Number of courses offered that include sustainability 61 0

Number of academic departments (or the equivalent) that offer at least one sustainability course and/or course that includes sustainability (at any level):
11

Total number of academic departments (or the equivalent) that offer courses (at any level):
24

Number of years covered by the data:
Three

A copy of the institution’s inventory of its course offerings with sustainability content (and course descriptions):
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An inventory of the institution's course offerings with sustainability content (and course descriptions):

ESS-100 Environmental Systems I (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) This course introduces students to the concept of systems, reviews ecological systems and then goes on to human systems as these impact the environment. The course will explore the two forces that are at the core of most environmental impacts (climate change, ozone depletion, air and water pollution, and a loss of biodiversity) will be explored as will the fundamental attributes of agriculture, food, soil and water. Throughout, the influence of culture, society, ethics and science on the environmental problems will be discussed. Prerequisites: None.
ESS-110 Environmental Systems II (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N,CW) This course is part of a 2-course series designed for freshmen in Environmental Science and Studies. The course introduces students to the concepts of environmental systems and sustainability, review ecological systems and human impact the environment. Students will be introduced to scientific writing - reviewing journal articles; use of bibliographic software; experimental design and hypotheses testing; data analysis and interpretation of results. Environmental problem-solving and use of EXCEL data sheets will also be covered. Prerequisites: ESS POE.
ESS-219 Agroecology (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; N) This course will explore alternate production systems in agriculture as ecological systems.
ESS-224 Wildlife Management (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N) Wildlife management incorporates the science and management of wild animals, both rare and common species. Threatened species may require particular knowledge of population structure and processes for effective management, while common species may need control or might be exploited as novel production products. Prerequisites: ESS100 and BI105 and BI121. A special course fee is assessed.
ESS-235 Environmental Reading (Fall; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; N,CW) This class will explore 2-3 classic and/or modern works in environmental studies and natural history. The writers list includes: Aldo Leopold, Annie Dillard, Dan Dagett, Saul Alinski, Wangari Maathai, Gifford Pinchot, Bill McKibben, Mary Kingsley, Ian McHarg, Wendel Berry, Andrew Lytle, Ester Boserup, Roderick Nash, Vandana Shiva, Rose Reuter, Barry Lopez, Bernd Heinrich and others.
ESS-269 Art As Sustainable Development (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; F,I) Taught in India. Art as a Sustainable Development: Pottery, Beadwork, Leatherwork, and Sculpture (3 Units). Where: Various locations (Auroville, Mahabalipuram, and Kodiakanal). Local coastal industries in India are comprised of a wide variety of artisanship. When: February. Subjects: The arts of coastal India include pottery, beadwork, stonework, leatherwork, and jewelry. This course will provide the opportunity to work with the artists who train local people and produce these works for sale. This will cover introductory classes in these arts. The student will also visit the production factories and cottage industries where these products are produced for market. The student will also compare the economic structure of villages where the artesian communities operate with nearby villages dependent primarily on either agriculture or industry. This comparison will give the students clear perspective on the role of art in sustainable development. Students wishing to further their study in any of these fields may negotiate more time in the studios. Instructors: Angad Vohra (Pottery & Sculpture), Meena (Painting), Gillian (Beadwork & Leatherwork), Francois Grenier (Stonework). Prerequisite: ESS100.
ESS-300 Envir.Problem Solving (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; S,N) Students will practice and gain experience in solving actual environmental problems by putting academic theory to work in real world situations. Students will learn to work effectively in interdisciplinary teams comprised of both environmental scientist and environmental studies students. This course serves as preparation for senior research and internships. Prerequisite: ESS100.
ESS-301 Environmental Methods (Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) This course deals with a variety of environmental issues and problems. This includes the causes and the scientific and social backgrounds needed to understand them. It also introduces the student to the roles of scientists and engineers in dealing with them. The course involves both quantitative and qualitative assessments. Prerequisites: ESS100 and 1 year of chemistry or permission of the instructor.
ESS-305 Environmental Economics (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) This course will cover the basics of microeconomic analysis as it applies to the environmental decision making and environmental policy with respect to pollution abetment, resource harvesting, and sustainability analysis. The course will also explore the strengths and weaknesses of economic models of human behavior. Finally, the course explores the growing concern of sustainable and resilient economies. Prerequisites: ESS100 and EB105 or EB223 or permission of the instructor.
ESS-310 Water Resources I (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; QS,N) This course provides the student with a working overview of the hydrologic cycle, providing the student with the basic concepts of all aspects of hydrology. Particular emphasis is placed on the integrative nature of ecosystems within the watershed, including the interdependencies and driving forces of energy, the atmosphere, the hydrosphere, and the land, and the biosphere. Prerequisites: ESS100.
ESS-320 Environmental Monitoring (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N) This course develops skills in monitoring the environment, with a strong focus on water quality monitoring (both chemical and biological) in a variety of habitats. Environmental site assessment will also be conducted. A weekend-long field trip is required. Prerequisite: ESS 100 and ESS-200 or permission.
ESS-324 Natural Resource Management (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N) This course provides a comprehensive coverage of local, regional, national, and global resource and environmental issues from population growth to wetlands to sustainable agriculture and natural resource policies and legislation. It considers renewable and non-renewable resources such as water, land, soil, air, wildlife, and their associated habitats. Prerequisites: ESS100 and BI105 and BI121. A special course fee is as sessed.
ESS-325 Conservation Biology (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S,N) Conservation Biology encompasses biology, politics, ethics, economics and anthropology. The major course objective is the exploration of conservation complexities--important for successful conservation efforts. Other objectives are to gain an understanding of extinction, community conservation, population genetics and demography. This course has a required weekend field trip with a fee added for the trip. Prerequisites: ESS100 or BI105.
ESS-328 Limnology (Fall; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N) An ecology/environmental science course covering inland aquatic environments (lakes and streams). A balanced study of both physical-chemical and biological aspects, it is an appropriate upper level addition to a variety of POE's in natural sciences. Take BI105 and BI121 and ESS100 or permission of the instructor.
ESS-337 Environmental Law (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) This course will examine the major environmental laws in the United States and major Supreme Court cases covering these statutes. The status covered will be National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), The Clean Water Act (CWA), The Clean Air Acr (CAA), The Endangered Species Act (ESA), Federal Insecticide Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), and The Toxic Substances Control Act (TOSCA), The Forest Land Policy and Management Act (FLPMA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the Superfund Amendment and Reauthorization Act (SARA). Prerequisites: PS101 and ESS100.
ESS-350 Field Research Methods (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) Field Methodologies is intended for students interested in gaining experience in conducting filed based ecological or environmental research. Students will be lead through the process of investigation, including the generation of research questions, research planning and design, analysis of data, and presentation methods, while giving them the opportunity to conduct independent projects. This is not a techniques/equipment training course; it will fulfill the independent study requirement of the ESS POE. This course will be particularly useful to students considering a field based senior research project. A course in statistics or ecology is highly recommended. Prerequisites: ESS100.
ESS-355 Ornithology (Summer; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) This course provides a comprehensive survey of the comparative biology, ecology, and behavior of birds with a special focus on issues pertaining to conservation management. Laboratory activities focus on field identification of birds and research and monitoring techniques. Prerequisites: BI113 or 1 college level organismal or ecology courses. Note: A special fee is applied. Course will run from June 1st to June 30th.
ESS-361 Field Methods in Marine Systems (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N,Q) Taught in India. This is the methods portion of the course including field techniques, quantitative methods, and a scientific writing seminar. The student requirements will be a short paper, four section quizzes and a final exam Prerequisites: GL111 and ESS100. Permission of instructor required.
ESS-362 Island Ecosystems (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) Taught in India. This course will introduce the students to island ecosystems from both applied and theoretical viewpoint. The course will run in the Andaman Islands in India. The topics covered will include island fauna, island flora, reef ecosystems, and a ridge to reef view of these complex biotas. Prerequisites: GL111 and ESS100.
ESS-363 Upland Process and Estuaries (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) Taught in India. This course will introduce students to estuaries and upland processes. About 50% of the course will be on site with the discussion and activities intended to give a very close view of the processes, ecology, and issues in coastal watersheds and estuaries. Prerequisites: GL111 and ESS100 and permission of instructor.
ESS-364 Culture, Class and Gender (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; CA,S,I,CW) Taught in India. This course will cover issue of gender and other disadvantaged groups in coastal management. Fishing villages' area often composed of people who are ethnically, religiously, or class wise distinct from upland populations. Women furthermore also have culturally distinct roles in the resource harvesting, production, and processing of natural resources. Course takes place in India. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and permission of the Center for International Education and ESS100.
ESS-365 Sustainable Development (Summer; Variable; 3.00 Credits; I,N) This course is a combination of sustainable agriculture, sustainable forestry, coastal fisheries, very low impact living, and ecotourism. We will travel from Chennai to Pondicherry, then to the foothills of the Western Ghats, onward to the coastal port of Kochi in Kerala, and finally to the ecotourism resorts in Kovalam. Prerequisites: SO, JR, or SR standing.
ESS-375 Sustainability (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N,CW,CA) Taught at Raystown Field Station. Students study sustainability, considering the triad of environment, economics and society, with a systems-view, connecting cultural practices to the concept of limits. Energy and Policy and topics focusing on the challenges of cultural change will be studied in depth with lecture, discussion, writing, simulations, field trips and integration with the Sense of Place seminar. Note: Special fees may apply to this course. Prerequisite: ESS100. Corequisites: PACS180 and ESS232 and ESS380.
ESS-380 Sense of Place Seminar (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; CA,CW) Taught at Raystown Field Station. This is the " cornerstone " of the Sense of Place semester, managed by one faculty, but comprised of a series of modules taught by various faculty and guest speakers. Module topics cover a range of environmental, ecological, and societal issues connecting to the region. Students will be expected to journal their experiences at RFS as well as complete other writing assignments. Note: There is a course fee assessed. Prerequisites: ESS100 or permission of the instructor.
ESS-400 Senior Capstone I (Fall; Even Years; 3.00 Credits; CW) The Senior Capstone course is intended to provide a real-world, project-based experience working on an advanced-level project. The student teams utilize skills they have acquired in their academic career to evaluate and provide potential solutions to realistic environmental tasks. The project will be chosen each semester based on needs and opportunities in local agencies to provide an advanced project that can be done in one semester. Prerequisite: ESS200 and Senior Standing or permission of the instructor.
ESS-401 Senior Capstone II (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N,S) This course is the second semester of the Senior Capstone. It is intended to provide a real-world, project-based experience working on an advanced- level project. The student teams utilize skills they have acquired in their academic career to evaluate and provide potential solutions to realistic environmental tasks. The project will be chosen each year based on needs and opportunities in local agencies to provide and advanced project that can be done in one year. Prerequisites: ESS100 and ESS400 and Junior or Senior standing or permission.
ESS-410 Water Resources II (Spring; Odd Years; 3.00 Credits; QS,N) This is an advanced hydrology course aimed at furthering the students understanding of the complex interactions of the hydrologic cycle. Particular emphasis will be placed on mathematically modeling the process including precipitation, runoff, infiltration, soil moisture and stream flow. Prerequisites: ESS310 and MA130
ESS-450 Environmental Research (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 1.00-6.00 Credits; S) An independent research experience that includes the preparation of a research proposal. Students present research results during weekly meetings with instructor. A research paper is the end point of the research experience. Presentation of results at national meetings is encouraged. May be repeated for up to 15 credits. Prerequisite: ESS100 and ESS300 and permission of the instructor.
ESS-460 Coastal Zone Management (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Taught in India. This course will cover the current legal status, international treaties, state and central government coastal zone management regulations, and the history and current status of conflict and the attempts to overcome that conflict in India. This includes shrimp farming, over fishing, pollution, shipping, oil spills changes in beach morphology and coastal topography from weirs dams, etc. Prerequisites: GL111 and ESS100.
AR-327 Environmental Art (Fall; Variable; 3.00 Credits; F) This class will deliver an in-depth exploration of environmental perspectives and how they engage an analysis of current environmental concerns as interpreted through artworks. An appreciation and understanding of the processes and products of various media utilized in artworks through practical applications will be emphasized. A broad study of environmental history encompassing societal issues, theories, artworks, and critical analysis (of content and aesthetics) will strengthen existing knowledge of the basic concepts of visual culture. Prerequisites: Take any 1 100 or 200 level art course.
BI-105 Biological Diversity and Ecology (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) The first of two introductory courses for students pursuing a program of emphasis in biology or in related areas such as biochemistry or environmental science. Topics covered include Mendelian genetics, evolution, ecology and the diversity of life.
BI-300 General Ecology (Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) Examines the interactions of living organisms with their physical, chemical and biotic environments. Special attention is given to the environmental, biological and historical factors affecting the distribution, abundance, adaptation, and diversity of species in natural communities. This course deals with " ecological principles " , and as such complements the Introduction to Environmental Science course, which deals with environmental issues. Prerequisites: BI105 and BI121 or permission of the instructor. Corequisite: BI301.
BI-301 General Ecology Lab (Spring; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; N) Students work together as research teams to carry out original investigations on the ecology of local species and natural communities. Emphasis on ecological research design, data collection and analysis, and oral and written presentation of results. Frequent field trips are included. Note: a special lab fee is assessed and one field trip may require an additional fee. Corequisite: BI300.
* HS-262 North American Environmental History (Spring; Odd Years; 3.00 Credits; H) This course examines human relationships with natural ecosystems over time, changing ideas of nature and how such actions and ideas change the environment and human society. Students will select current environmental issues and prove the history of these topics.
* IS-105 World Regional Geography (Either Semester; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; I) A survey for the world's major cultural realms. Included are geographic setting, resources, environmental restrictions, historical and cultural traditions, industrial and agricultural development, economic base and trends, population distribution and political subdivisions.
* ND-260 Remote Field Course I (Summer; Yearly; 2.00 Credits) This course is a 16 day module format field experience in south western Colorado and southeastern Utah. Students will complete a selection of modules in one or more of the following areas: anthropology, ecology, environmental science and studies or geology. Four faculty, one from each of these disciplines, will supervise the different modules. All students will also complete integrated, interdisciplinary modules. Summer school offering only. Prerequisites: Differs for each module and permission of instructor.
* ND-261 Remote Field Course II (Summer; Yearly; 2.00 Credits) This course is a 16-day module-format field experience in Southwestern Colorado and southeastern Utah. Students will complete a selection of modules in one or more of the following areas: Anthropology, ecology, environmental science and studies or geology. Four faculty, one from each of these disciplines, will supervise the different modules. All students will also complete integrated, interdisciplinary modules that are different than the modules students took in ND260. Summer school offering only. Prerequisites: Differs for each module and ND260 and permission of instructor.
* ND-262B Lake Powell Lab Mini Labs for Remote Field Course (Summer; Yearly; 0.00 Credits) We will spend three days boating on Lake Powell while discussing and studying the results of the Glen Canyon Dam, including exploring the controversy from a view of water supply, economic and environmental impacts. Corequisites: ND260 or ND261 or IC207. Note: A special course fee is assessed.
* ND-262C The Atomic Age (Summer; Yearly; 0.00 Credits) On July 16, 1945 the world changed with the explosion of the first atomic bomb at the Trinity site, near Socorro, New Mexico. This module will visit a number of sites in New Mexico and Arizona which have played a seminal role in the " atomic age " . Corequisites: ND260 or ND261 or IC207.
* ND-262G Biodiv. S.W. Ecosystems (Summer; Yearly; 0.00 Credits) This module reveals the biotic diversity of unique desert ecosystems of southeastern Arizona - the Sonoran Desert and Chihuahuan Desert. This module examines the plant and animal associations and adaptations exhibited in this arid environment. Thisregion contains arid desert flats, rocky canyons, creeks, alpine meadows and talus slopes. We will investigate the plant and animal diversity of the Chiricahua and Dragon Mountains through hands-on exploration. We will traverse a range of elevations; from desert flats (4,000 ft.) to mountain peaks (nearly 9,000 ft.).
* ND-262K Interpret Past/Present (Summer; Yearly; 0.00 Credits) We will explore the prehistoric and present indigenous cultures, agriculture, religion, social and political organization. We will visit ruins ranging from Mesa Verde National Monument (maintained by the National Park Service) to the Ute Mountain Tribal Park on the Ute Mountain reservation. We will also participate in a one- half day work project for the Ute Mountain Tribe. We will contrast the ruins seen at Mesa Verde and the Ute Mountain Tribal Park with reconstructed ruins we will visit in New Mexico. We will also observe and discuss contemporary American Indian economic problems and strategies. Corequisites: ND260 or ND261 or IC207.
* ND-262T Agriculture Over 3000 Years (Summer; Variable; 0.00 Credits) During this 4 day module, we'll be exploring museums as educational resources and discover the impact of agricultural change over 3000 years. Over the first two days, come explore the New Mexico Farm and Ranch Museum and the Amerind Foundation Museum and learn about setting up exhibits, and explore the agricultural artifacts dating back 3000 years. Are there lessons to learn from the past? On the third day we'll head to the Sonora Desert Museum and wrap up on the fourth day with the Casa Grande Ruins before arriving at the Grand Canyon. Evenings will be spent hiking and camping with the biology module.
* ND-262X Earth, Air, Fire, Water (Summer; Yearly; 0.00 Credits) The Colorado Plateau is a beautiful but harsh land, leaving bare to view the record of a a tumultuous geologic history and a landscape that challenges the ingenuity of those who would dwell there. This module visits pueblo, cliff, and contemporary sites where dwellers have dealt in diverse ways with extremes of wind and weather, lack of water for livestock and crops, a landscape with poor and limiting soils, and sometimes hostile neighbors. This module explores the strategies that residents have used in trying to make the most of what the Earth has to offer. Must be concurrently enrolled in IC 207 for which a special fee is levied.
* PACS-239/PC-239 Nuclear Threat (Spring; Variable; 4.00 Credits; CA,H,N,CW) This course examines the development and ramifications of nuclear weapons. Students will learn the basic physics upon which these devices operate, and explore moral issues that arose in the interactions of communities impacted by their construction, use and testing, including the perspective of scientists, government officials, and affected citizenry. Current concerns regarding nuclear weapons will be studied as well.
* PL-265 Environmental Ethics (Fall; Even Years; 3.00 Credits; H) As the life-support system for everyone, the environment is unquestionably of high value. Yet decisions about its care and its uses evoke controversy. This course explores contrasting viewpoints and practices that impact the earth and its plant and animal life. Through readings, projects, and critical discussion of cases, students apply ethical theories to selected contemporary issues.
* AN-451 Cultural Ecology (Spring; Even Years; 3.00 Credits; S) An examination of the relationships between man and his environment, particularly noting how ecological variables influence such cultural patterns as subsistence, settlement, social relationships and stress behaviors. Some consideration is given to problems of the future. Prerequisite: AN151 or AN254.
* SW-231 Social Problems & Social Welfare (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) Explores persistent social problems such as poverty, inequality, and oppression, unemployment, family violence, and substance abuse using historical, philosophical, and social science perspectives. The development of social policies and services as institutional responses to these problems are described and analyzed. Prerequisites: SO101.
* SW-333 Social Welfare Policies and Services (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; S) A conceptual study of the meanings, nature, scope, implementation and evaluation of social policy as it relates to issues of social welfare. Prerequisites: SW231 and ND.SS215.
BI-321 Ecological Genetics (Spring; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N,QS) Ecological genetics is concerned with the genetics of ecologically and evolutionarily important traits, that is, traits related to fitness such as survival, growth, and reproduction. It is the study of the process of phenotypic evolution occurring in present-day natural populations. Basic and advanced concepts in population and quantitative genetics are covered, including measuring selection on phenotypic characters, with a focus on methods applicable to field studies of ecologically important traits. Mathematical and conceptual material are fully integrated and explained. Application to conservation, spread of invasive species, evolution of pesticide, herbicide, and antibiotic resistance, and environmental effects of genetically modified organisms used in agriculture will be covered. Lab period willbe devoted to problem solving, discussion group, experimental manipulation and simulation studies, and independent student research projects. Prerequisites: BI105 and BI106 and BI305 or MA220.
BI-323 Mammalogy (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N) Examines the comparative biology of living mammals, including taxonomy, evolution, biogeography, ecology, morphology, physiology and behavior. Special attention is given to conservation issues, the relevance of mammals in modern biological research, and field techniques for studying mammals. Prerequisites: BI105 or permission of the instructor.
BI-324 Ornithology (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) This course provides a comprehensive survey of the comparative biology, ecology, and behavior of birds with a special focus on issues pertaining to conservation and management. Laboratory activities focus on field identification of birds and research and monitoring techniques. Several field trips are possible with one possible 3 day trip to Assatteague Island. Prerequisite: BI105.
BI-325 Plant Ecology (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) Primarily an ecology course, but also included is a significant amount of plant identification/classification and plant epochology. The ecology portion will cover the whole spectrum of this fast-growing field; from communities and ecosystems to theory and adaptation. Corequisite: BI326. Prerequisites: BI105 and Junior or Senior standing.
BI-326 Plant Ecology Lab (Variable; Yearly; 1.00 Credit; N) The first 10 weeks are devoted to laboratory work on the identification of the local entophyte flora. Students are required to make a personal collection representing a minimum of 8 families and are expected to become proficient in using a scientific manual. During the 5th and 6th week there is a mandatory all day field trip to collect forest data. An extensive paper on forest succession will be due by semester's end. Note: A special fee is assessed. Corequisite: BI325.
BI-327 Botany (Spring; Yearly; 4.00 Credits; N) This course will provide an in-depth examination of the biology of plants. In lecture and lab we will examine plant reproduction and development, morphology and physiology, evolution and biodiversity, and ecology and conservation. Particular attention will be paid to the aspects of plant biology that are unique to this branch of life and/or are of critical importance to human or other biotic interactions (e.g. photosynthesis, pollination, agriculture, etc.). Prerequisites: BI105. Note: A special course fee is applied.
BI-360 Vertebrate Zoology (Fall; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) Focuses on the vertebrate animals of the Eastern United States. Collection, taxonomic identification and natural history are emphasized. Suggested corequisites: BI361. Prerequisites: BI105 and Ecology/Biology related POE.
BI-361 Vertebrate Zoology Lab (Fall; Yearly; 2.00 Credits; N) Frequent field trips, for observation and specimen collection are followed by exercises in identification, specimen preparation, and museum techniques to illustrate and augment the concepts and content of the lecture. Note: A special fee is assessed and one optional field trip requires an additional fee. Corequisite: BI360.
BI-432 Environmental Toxicology (Fall; Odd Years; 3.00 Credits; N) Broadly integrative in nature, this class examines the fate and actions of xenobiotic compounds in environmental systems and focuses on the potential for deleterious consequences in wildlife species and humans. Examines aspects of chemistry, cell biology and ecology in considering environmental contamination. Instruction includes lectures and student presentations/writing exercises. Prerequisites: BI-105 and one semester of chemistry or permission of the instructor.
IC-214 Global Climate Change (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; IC) This course examines the science and politics of global climate change, including data and analyses in the assessment reports of the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The course also examines how governments and other political actors craft and shape policies related to climate change. Special attention will be placed on the extent to which public policy is influenced by scientific evidence and political considerations. Prerequisites: EN110 or EN109.
IC-222 Global Conversations (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; IC,CW) This course is meant to help students develop a better understanding of the environmental problems associated with economic globalization and thus to prepare them for active participation as citizens engaged in a " global conversation " in a civil society that is also global in scope. The fundamental assumption of the course is that the problems we face today as a species are massive and only by understanding them within a global context will we be able to find the solutions necessary for viable human habitation of the planet to continue. The course attempts to make a step toward these goals through helping students to " connect the dots " between a variety of issues including toxicity in the human body, consumerism, food, population, energy, and climate change among others, as well as online components that link students from 15 - 20 different countries throughout the world in Study Circles in which they work on a common project. Prerequisites: EN110 or EN109 (CWS).
C-288 Environ. Resource Entrepreneurship I (Variable; Yearly; 1.00 Credit) The goal of this course is to get an introduction into natural resource management in Taiwan from an environmental and a business perspective. As part of the course, we plan to have guest presentations from practitioners and experts in a range of natural resource topics including sustainable fisheries, aquaculture, wetland management, ecotourism, waste and water management, and Ecological Economics. Prerequisites: EN110 or EN109. Students enrolled in IC288 are supposed to enroll in IC289 as well, as students need to complete both IC288 and IC289 in order to obtain the IC credit. IC289 includes a field trip to Taiwan.
IC-289 Environ. Resource Entrepreneurship II (Variable; Yearly; 2.00 Credits; IC) The goal of this course is to get an introduction into natural resource management in Taiwan from an environmental and a business perspective. As part of the course, we plan to have guest presentations from practitioners and experts in a range of natural resource topics including sustainable fisheries, aquaculture, wetland management, ecotourism, waste and water management, and Ecological Economics. Students enrolled in IC 288 are supposed to enroll in IC 289 as well, as students need to complete both IC 288 and IC 289 in order to obtain the IC credit. IC 289 includes a field trip to Taiwan.
ED-219 Environmental Education: Past & Future (Variable; Variable; 1.00 Credit; S) Environmental Education is becoming a primary focus and mandated in K-12 schools in Pennsylvania. We'll explore the historical roots, review the standards, review research and prominent researchers in EE, determine the essential elements and find and develop environmental lessons to be incorporated in today's classrooms.
GL-100A Environmental Geology (Fall & Spring; Yearly; 3.00 Credits; N) Student perceptions of what constitutes geology have shifted. Contemporary students need to be made aware that geology IS the study of the physical environment of the earth and that a central part of what geologists do entails an exploration of how humans and the built environment both affect and are affected by the earth's physical/environmental system. While our previous title and description for this course, Introduction to Physical Geology, carried these implicit understandings, we find it important now to draw students' attention explicitly to the environmental character of our study of Earth.
GL-116 Sustainable Ag in Pa (Spring; Variable; 1.00 Credit; N) This is a largely experiential course exploring the food production system through visits to local natural foods producers, CSA farmers, producers of locally grown organic food for the urban market and to conventional farms for contrast. An overview is provided into issues of soil amendments, methods of pest control, feedlot and pastured meat and dairy production, and cheese-making. Students will discuss with farmers their zeal, their economic and social objectives, and their challenges. A sizable lab fee is assessed to cover multiple field trips, and includes registration for the Farming for the Future Conference of the Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture. The course includes multiple REQUIRED weekend field trips.
GL-126 Environmental Geochemistry (Variable; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N) This course will introduce fundamental geologic process through a geochemical lens. Basic geochemical reactions involving water-rock interactions at both high and low temperatures will be considered. The class will focus on the environmental problems in atmosphere and continents. Prereq: CH114.
GL-215 Energy,minerals and Society (Fall; Variable; 3.00 Credits; N) Energy, Minerals, and Society. Twenty-first century societies run on the twin nutrients of abundant energy and the mineral resources needed to fashion technological devices. While both energy and mineral commodities are subject to wildly oscillating demand as economies alternately flourish and falter, the global demand for all such commodities has shown inexorable growth since the onset of the industrial era. Globalization has increased this rate of growth. But, extraction and use of resources invariably alters landscapes and releases pollutants into the environment. How adequate are supplies? How can they be used with minimal adverse impact? To what extent can impacts be managed by use of alternative energies, by recycling, by conservation? These topics are the focus of Energy, Minerals and Society.


The website URL where the inventory of course offerings with sustainability content is publicly available:
A brief description of the methodology the institution followed to complete the course inventory:

Two faculty members from environmental science and biology went through the course catalog. Classes with a known sustainability component were select. Faculty teaching classes that potentially covered sustainability topics were contacted and asked if the material they covered met the criteria. Those that met the criteria were added to the list.


How did the institution count courses with multiple offerings or sections in the inventory?:
Each course was counted as a single course regardless of the number of offerings or sections

A brief description of how courses with multiple offerings or sections were counted (if different from the options outlined above):
---

Which of the following course types were included in the inventory?:
Yes or No
Internships No
Practicums No
Independent study No
Special topics No
Thesis/dissertation No
Clinical No
Physical education No
Performance arts No

Does the institution designate sustainability courses in its catalog of course offerings?:
No

Does the institution designate sustainability courses on student transcripts?:
No

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.