Overall Rating Gold - expired
Overall Score 65.92
Liaison Christie-Joy Hartman
Submission Date Dec. 21, 2018
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

James Madison University
EN-1: Student Educators Program

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.40 / 4.00 Amanda Presgraves
Sustainability Coordinator
JMU Dining
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Number of students enrolled for credit (headcount):
23,354

Total number of students enrolled for credit that are served (i.e. directly targeted) by a student peer-to-peer sustainability outreach and education program (avoid double-counting to the extent feasible):
13,990

Percentage of students served by a peer-to-peer educator program:
59.90

Name of the student educators program:
Environmental Sustainability - Dining Services Sustainability Interns

Number of students served (i.e. directly targeted) by the program (headcount):
13,240

A brief description of the program, including examples of peer-to-peer outreach activities:

The sustainability internship program through Aramark is focused on advancing sustainability through dining-related activities. The program is closely coordinated with the Office of Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability. The dining locations are also used as information dissemination points for peer-to-peer student messaging. Interns also lead their own initiatives based on their area of study and passion. Examples of student projects include the farmers markets and reusable beverage container promotion events. The target population is students who had a meal plan in Fall 2017.


A brief description of how the student educators are selected:

Students apply and are competitively selected. They report to Dining Service's Sustainability Coordinator. The student job position was sent out across the University and posted online under "Careers" with Aramark. A resume and cover letter were required, and phone and in-person interviews were conducted. Students were selected based on specified qualifications, specifications, tasks, and responsibilities.


A brief description of the formal training that the student educators receive to prepare them to conduct peer outreach:

Onboarding includes initial education about current programs, roles and responsibilities, as well as shadowing of both current sustainability interns and the Sustainability Coordinator. Each intern is involved with peer-to-peer education on content, such as local foods and vegetarian options, executing educational tabling, and running sustainability events. They are provided and trained on scripts for each event. Training includes individual and group components. Students are then consistently mentored and work alongside the Sustainability Coordinator and are grown to independently implement their own original peer outreach ideas. Weekly training time adds up to approximately 30 hours annually per intern.


A brief description of the financial and/or administrative support the institution provides to the program (e.g. annual budget and/or faculty/staff coordination):

Each intern is paid and employed by Aramark. There were five interns in 2017-18.


Name of the student educators program (2nd program):
Social Sustainability - LGBTQ & Ally Education Program Peer Educators

Number of students served (i.e. directly targeted) by the program (2nd program):
500

A brief description of the program, including examples of peer-to-peer outreach activities (2nd program):

The Peer Educators are JMU students in the LGBTQ+ community able to facilitate conversations on identities, inclusivity, language, and more. The peer educators
1-Work with a dynamic team of students to spread awareness of the LGBTQ+ community on JMU's campus
2- Assist with tabling events on specific topics pertaining to the LGBTQ+ community programs covering various LGBTQ+ topics and experiences are offered for classes, organizations, and groups.
To request an outreach program, there is a quick form online.
https://www.jmu.edu/lgbta/volunteer.shtml


A brief description of how the student educators are selected (2nd program):

Participants contact the organizing office and are interviewed. A continuing call for volunteers and peer educators is posted on the program's website.


A brief description of the formal training that the student educators receive to prepare them to conduct peer outreach (2nd program):

Peer educators complete a minimum of 2 hours of volunteering a week and attend 3 out of 5 Professional Development Programs hosted by the Volunteer Coordinator each semester.



A brief description of the financial and/or administrative support the institution provides to the program (e.g. annual budget and/or faculty/staff coordination) (2nd program):

The program coordination is administered by the university through the Health Center.


Name of the student educators program (3rd program):
Environmental Sustainability - X-Labs Fueled

Number of students served (i.e. directly targeted) by the program (3rd program):
1,000

A brief description of the program, including examples of peer-to-peer outreach activities (3rd program):

X-Labs is a JMU maker space that encourages and facilitates cross-disciplinary courses where students address real world problems using a variety of technologies. In the Fueled X-Lab course, ENVT402E, cross-disciplinary student teams work together on innovative projects directly applicable to sustainable food systems and the Fueled Food Truck. Creative development and implementation of team concepts focus on industrial and environmental design, nutrition/health promotion, mind-body awareness, graphic design, marketing, campus/K-12 education and community engagement. The course’s influence on the JMU campus and surrounding community provide the framework for a model to be shared nationally with other universities. First taught in 2017, the class brought students together from several areas of study, including biology, business management, communications and media arts & design. Multidisciplinary teams developed and built projects. Student projects in 2018 focused on wasted food and K-12 education.


A brief description of how the student educators are selected (3rd program):

Students enroll in the course. The faculty teaching the course actively recruit students.


A brief description of the formal training that the student educators receive to prepare them to conduct peer outreach (3rd program):

The students...
• Develop collaborative skills through teamwork and affiliated partnerships within JMU and the greater Harrisonburg community
• Apply problem-solving skills in addressing real-world situations
• Interface with growers and producers to increase awareness of local sourcing and sustainable practices
• Design and implement novel ideas or technologies
• Evaluate and assess viability, broader impact and limitations of course deliverables
• Cultivate an awareness of the profound influences food, nutrition and attitude have on mind and body


A brief description of the financial and/or administrative support the institution provides to the program (e.g. annual budget and/or faculty/staff coordination) (3rd program):

Two instructors receive course-buy out support from X-Labs to co-teach the course.


A brief description of all other student peer-to-peer sustainability outreach and education programs, including the number of students served and how student educators are selected, trained, and supported by the institution:
---

Total number of hours student educators are engaged in peer-to-peer sustainability outreach and education activities annually (all programs):
---

The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
---

Additional documentation to support the submission:
---

Dining Services peer educator information entered by Ms. Amanda Presgraves, Aramark Sustainability Coordinator.

LGBTQ peer educator and Ally Education peer educator information provided by Ms. Veronica Jones, Associate Director for Health Promotion and Well-Being.

X-Labs information confirmed by Dr. Mikaela Harsh-Schmidt, Associate Professor, Interdisciplinary Liberal Studies.

To avoid double counting, it was estimated that half of the students targeted by the second and third program did not overlap with each other or the first program.

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution or simply email your inquiry to stars@aashe.org.