Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 74.09
Liaison Merry Rankin
Submission Date Aug. 30, 2019
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

Iowa State University
EN-1: Student Educators Program

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 4.00 / 4.00 Merry Rankin
ISU Director of Sustainability
Facilities Planning & Management
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Number of students enrolled for credit (headcount):
34922

Total number of students enrolled for credit that are served (i.e. directly targeted) by a student peer-to-peer sustainability outreach and education program (avoid double-counting to the extent feasible):
34922

Percentage of students served by a peer-to-peer educator program:
100

Name of the student educators program:
Peer Wellness Educators

Number of students served (i.e. directly targeted) by the program (headcount):
34922

A brief description of the program, including examples of peer-to-peer outreach activities:

Peer Wellness Educators are highly trained undergraduate students who work with their fellow peers at Iowa State University (ISU) to promote wellness through evidence-informed educational and social marketing strategies designed to enhance knowledge around the 8 dimensions of wellness and increase access to wellness information and resources on campus.

PWE roles include including presentations to student groups, planning and implementing wellness events and programs, and the creation and promotion of wellness messages/campaigns to other students, among other responsibilities.


A brief description of how the student educators are selected:

PWE’s apply for the selection process one year before commencement of their duties. Positions are open to students of all majors and academic backgrounds, with the requirement for "[S]tudents to be interested in wellness and interested in working with other students to help them be more successful at ISU."


A brief description of the formal training that the student educators receive to prepare them to conduct peer outreach:

Mandatory training includes completion of the two-credit U ST 316X: Leadership in Peer Education course the spring before employment, an additional week of wellness training before their first semester of employment, weekly wellness specialization training meetings, and attendance at all other PWE meetings. Training topics include wellness programs, facilitating presentations, public speaking, helping skills, problem solving skills, research skills, and collaboration/relationship building skills.


A brief description of the financial and/or administrative support the institution provides to the program (e.g. annual budget and/or faculty/staff coordination):

Peer Wellness Educators are fully funded and supported by the Student Health and Wellness unit. Student Health and Wellness retains one staff advisor from each of the four departments (Student Wellness, Thielen Student Health, Student Counseling Services, and Recreation Services) to advise students and the organization's activities.


Name of the student educators program (2nd program):
Greenhouse Group

Number of students served (i.e. directly targeted) by the program (2nd program):
11378

A brief description of the program, including examples of peer-to-peer outreach activities (2nd program):

The Greenhouse Group manages and supports the recycling program for students and residents within the Department of Residence facilities. GHG members include a residence sustainability coordinator and residence recycling chairs responsible for outreach and oversight of their floor/house's recycling programs and sustainability initiatives. GHG members attend residence hall meetings to engage students for participation in the recycling and other sustainability programs. GHG initiatives include recycling of corrugated cardboard and other associated wastes during Fall move-in, a separate Recyclemania drive in the Spring, as well as tabling and public speaking engagements at several campus events.


A brief description of how the student educators are selected (2nd program):

Community Advisors solicit self-nominations from residents at initial residence meetings, whose names are then forwarded to the sustainability coordinator for participation in several training sessions.


A brief description of the formal training that the student educators receive to prepare them to conduct peer outreach (2nd program):

Tenured GreenHouse Group members first provide training to the Sustainability Coordinators, including familiarization with GHG practices and completion of a quiz via the online student learning portal. Sustainability Coordinators then collaborate to a provide a Recycling Chair training at the commencement of each semester, introducing those positions to their respective responsibilities familiarizing them with GHG practices, again concluding with a quiz tailored to their position before recognition of their role and commencement of their responsibilities.

Recycling Chairs, upon conclusion of their training, then attend residence hall house/floor meetings, presenting common practices, initiatives, and other educational information. Recycling Chairs will also manage signage familiarizing residents with recycling initiatives.

All signage and training materials are accessible via the Department of Residence website, and also appear in the student online learning portal for active members.


A brief description of the financial and/or administrative support the institution provides to the program (e.g. annual budget and/or faculty/staff coordination) (2nd program):

The Department of Residence at Iowa State supports this program with logistical and administrative support as well as providing information and resources about recycling at Iowa State.


Name of the student educators program (3rd program):
Peer Mentors/Learning Communities

Number of students served (i.e. directly targeted) by the program (3rd program):
6176

A brief description of the program, including examples of peer-to-peer outreach activities (3rd program):

To support Iowa State University’s commitment to student learning, the Learning Community initiative seeks to enhance our undergraduates’ experience by providing all interested students dynamic, focused communities in which students, staff, and faculty can learn and grow together.

Peer mentors are integral to the success of Learning Communities. Peer mentors are upper-division students from the major associated with their particular learning community. Peer mentors are often involved with organizing study groups, social events, and out-of class activities for learning community participants.

The peer mentor job is a live-in staff position, which requires that the mentor live on the same house as participants in the program. The Peer Mentor and the RA/CA are key staff members who work together to develop a community conducive to student success by encouraging positive behaviors and addressing behaviors that are detrimental to the individual and/or community. Like all residents, the Peer Mentor must support the Department of Residence policies and has a responsibility as a citizen/house member to challenge negative behaviors.

Peer Mentor Responsibilities Include:
- Coordinating one social activity a month for program participants.
- Maintain participant email list and provide information about the learning community to all members through this list.
- Familiarizing students with university resources; advising and referring residents to appropriate university resources.
- Attend class and facilitate study groups for the class.
- Attend a weekly meeting with the learning community coordinator.
- Maintain 2 office hours per week.
- Meet individually with students once a month and submit monthly reports to the coordinator.
- Be available for formal and informal interaction with the students in the program.
- Attend periodic meetings with Learning Community and Residence Life staff.


A brief description of how the student educators are selected (3rd program):

For consideration, candidates must possess the following qualifications:

- Minimum grade point average of 3.0
- Juniors and seniors are preferred, but other qualified applicants will be considered
- Experience living in a residence hall setting
- Strong interpersonal skills
- Knowledge of the major and college
- Self-motivation
- Must be available to attend Peer Mentor training in August prior to the beginning of school


A brief description of the formal training that the student educators receive to prepare them to conduct peer outreach (3rd program):

University-wide peer mentor training is typically provided in August, the week before the start of the fall semester. The training sessions target peer mentors who are new to their role. Second year mentors are welcome to attend and share their insights, but the purpose of the event is to provide new mentors with a fundamental background about mentoring/peer educating and discuss some of the situations they may face in their roles.

Sample training topics include:
effective communication
listening skills
conflict resolution
confidentiality
campus resources
working with groups
icebreakers
planning and programming


A brief description of the financial and/or administrative support the institution provides to the program (e.g. annual budget and/or faculty/staff coordination) (3rd program):

Iowa State University's Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching supports the program financially and administratively.


A brief description of all other student peer-to-peer sustainability outreach and education programs, including the number of students served and how student educators are selected, trained, and supported by the institution:
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Total number of hours student educators are engaged in peer-to-peer sustainability outreach and education activities annually (all programs):
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The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
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Additional documentation to support the submission:
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The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.