Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 67.61
Liaison Makayla Bonney
Submission Date Feb. 26, 2020

STARS v2.2

Indiana University Bloomington
PA-7: Support for Underrepresented Groups

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 3.00 / 3.00 Danni Schaust
ISDP Program Coordinator
Sustain IU
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have a publicly posted non-discrimination statement? :
Yes

The non-discrimination statement, including the website URL where the policy is publicly accessible:

Indiana University prohibits discrimination and harassment based on arbitrary considerations of such characteristics as age, color, disability, ethnicity, sex, marital status, national origin, race, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, or veteran status. The Office of Affirmative Action works to ensure compliance with federal, state and university equal employment opportunity and affirmative action policies and requirements. These procedures guide the Office of Affirmative Action when handling any incident of alleged discrimination related to the Bloomington campus.

Official Policy: http://policies.iu.edu/policies/categories/administration-operations/equal-opportunity/Equal-Opportunity-Affirmative-Action.shtml

Indiana University pledges itself to continue its commitment to the achievement of equal opportunity within the University and throughout American society as a whole. In this regard, Indiana University will recruit, hire, promote, educate, and provide services to persons based upon their individual qualifications.

As required by Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Indiana University does not discriminate on the basis of sex in its educational programs and activities, including employment and admission. Questions specific to Title IX may be referred to the Office for Civil Rights or the University Title IX Coordinator.

Indiana University shall take affirmative action, positive and extraordinary, to overcome the discriminatory effects of traditional policies and procedures with regard to the disabled, minorities, women, and veterans.


Does the institution have a discrimination response protocol or committee (sometimes called a bias response team)?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s discrimination response protocol or team:

IU has an electronic Bias Report mechanism, or faculty, students, and staff can contact the Office of Associate Dean of Students via email, phone, or in person. The electronic bias report mechanism is also available as an App in IU's app system, One.IU.edu, and is mobile friendly.

Website to report bias: https://studentaffairs.indiana.edu/student-support/get-help/report-bias-incident/index.html

IU uses a five-step process to respond to bias incidents.

Report: A bias responder receives a report of a bias incident.
Respond: The bias responder contacts the reporting party within two business days to gather information about the incident. (Reports can be submitted anonymously, but an anonymous report limits the bias responder’s ability to gather information and respond to the incident.)

Note: Reporting an incident does not necessarily mean you have to participate or move forward with a complaint under the university’s procedures. If you request that no action be taken, IU will weigh this request against its duty to maintain a safe community.

Non-retaliation provision
Retaliation against anyone who has reported an incident, provided information, or participated in a university investigation in response to a reported incident is prohibited by the university and will not be tolerated. The university will take steps to prevent retaliation, and will impose sanctions on anyone or any group who is found to have engaged in retaliation in violation of this policy. Concerns about potential retaliation can also be reported on the online Bias Report.

A trained campus representative will:

Review the report
Identify if there is an immediate emergency, if a criminal offense occurred, or if other university/campus partners are to be notified
Gather other preliminary information
Offer the complainant and witnesses resources and support
Assist the complainant in contacting local law enforcement if desired
Determine if the complainant wants to move forward with an investigation
In appropriate cases where facts are not in dispute, the respondent accepts responsibility, a resolution may be issued, with the consent of both the complainant and respondent

Many times the complainant wants a university official to be aware of a situation of student misconduct, but does not want to move forward with a formal investigation. And that is ok. In most situations the university is able to honor the complainants request. However, there are rare situations in which the nature of the incident or information known does require the university to proceed to an investigation. In these situations the complainant can chose how involved they are in the process.

When the complainant or university chose to move forward with student misconduct procedures, an investigative officer will be assigned to handle the case.

Responses to bias incidents may include:
If a professor is involved, administrators may grant the student alternative courses for the same credit so the student does not need to take a class with the professor involved in the case, and professors may be asked to use double-blind grading screens.
A notice to the campus community about the incident to create awareness and influence change
Educational conversations, workshops, seminars, and trainings
Removal of graffiti or flyers
Mediation and facilitated dialogue
Support and assistance to affected individuals and/or communities
Resolution agreements (e.g., behavioral contracts)
Verbal warnings
Referrals to relevant resources (e.g., Counseling and Psychological Services’ Let’s Talk program)
Referrals to other offices or departments as appropriate (e.g., the Office of Student Conduct or the IU Police Department)

The University is also committed to supporting DACA students, undocumented students, and immigrant faculty and staff, especially following recent Executive Orders. The University published the following information and sent to all campus members:
"We vigorously investigate and prosecute anyone who threatens, intimidates, or harasses any member of our community, and make special efforts to protect those who are targeted or at risk for physical harm, threats or intimidation. You may report a concern electronically or directly to Associate Dean of Students Carol McCord at incident@indiana.edu or at (812) 855-8188. Of course, call 911 if you face an immediate threat.
We will counsel students about and connect students to available resources for educational and living expenses for which they are legally eligible through the Office of Scholarships.
If you are detained or prevented from re-entering the U.S. while traveling, Indiana University will assist you. Please call Deputy General Counsel Joseph Scodro in the Office of the Vice President and General Counsel at 812-855-9739 or the Office of International Services (OIS) at 812-855-9086. During non-business hours, please contact the IU Police Department (IUPD) at 812-855-4111, and they will connect you immediately with an OIS official.

If you have immigration-related concerns, we provide counseling and support for IUB community members through OIS. Additionally, OIS has created a new web page that will be maintained with current information and advice.

OIS will also work with General Counsel to provide referrals to attorneys on immigration-related legal issues. We also have identified a group of attorneys willing to work with our students on a pro bono basis." - Provost Lauren Robel

For more info, please visit https://vpgc.iu.edu or https://ois.iu.edu/visas/daca-resources.html


Does the institution have programs specifically designed to recruit students from underrepresented groups?:
Yes

Does the institution have programs specifically designed to recruit academic staff from underrepresented groups?:
Yes

Does the institution have programs designed specifically to recruit non-academic staff from underrepresented groups?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s programs to recruit students, academic staff, and/or non-academic staff from underrepresented groups:

The IU Office of the Vice President for Diversity, Equity, and Multicultural Affairs (DEMA) connect approximately 2,500 minority precollege students and families with IU each year, including half-day, full-day, overnight, and summer programs: https://diversity.iu.edu/community-engagement/index.html

DEMA's overnight Spring Shadow program is a three-day academic and residential program for ninth, tenth, and eleventh graders. participants have the opportunity to attend classes with their mentors to learn about campus resources and financial aid and stay overnight on campus. There is no cost to students or families to participate in Spring Shadow, and meals and housing are provided.
https://collegeready.indiana.edu/campus-visits/spring-shadow.html

* The IU Kelley School of Business hosts two "MEET Kelley" immersive camp experiences for students considering a Kelley School degree from under-represented groups. The program is for high school students and all expenses are paid: https://kelley.iu.edu/Ugrad/PreCollege/MEETKelley/page39079.html

* IU Kelley School of Business hosts an "Up-Next Business Academy" is a program for Indiana High school students from under-represented groups monthly, and provides transportation for some students: https://kelley.iu.edu/Ugrad/PreCollege/UpNext/page45149.html

* The IU Kelley School of Business hosts an immersive camp called “Young Women’s Institute” for female high-school students from all populations.

https://kelley.iu.edu/Ugrad/PreCollege/YWI/page39078.html

* The IU President’s Diversity Initiatives seek to broaden participation of underrepresented minority (URM) students pursuing M.F.A. and Ph.D. degrees at Indiana University. The URM designation applies to racial, ethnic, gender, and disability classifications.

* The IU 21st Century Scholars Program was created in 1990 to provide academic and social support for low-income students who receive the Indiana 21st Century Scholarship Promise funded by the Indiana Commission for Higher Education (CHE). The early commitment college promise program funds up to 4-years of tuition and mandatory fees at IUB. IUB students who receive the Indiana 21stCentury Scholarship may qualify to receive the Covenant funded by the IU Office of Scholarships. http://21centuryscholars.indiana.edu

* The IU Groups Scholars Program was created in 1968 as a way to increase college attendance among first-generation, underrepresented students at Indiana University. The IU Groups Scholars Program provides academic, financial, and social support to help students attain a bachelor's degree at Indiana University. The program offers an extensive student support system, including academic advising, tutoring, enrollment in specialized courses, and activities designed to foster academic success and degree completion. http://groupsscholars.indiana.edu

* The IU Hudson & Holland Scholars Program (HHSP) is a scholarship and support program for high achieving underrepresented minorities. The program provides a variety of support services to address the holistic needs of student participants in the program. HHSP students are some of the best and brightest students at IU whose presence and contributions enrich the learning environment by living the HHSP motto: Leadership, Engagement, Academics, and Diversity. http://www.indiana.edu/~hhsp

* The IU Community & School Partnerships (CSP) helps high school students from minority and underrepresented populations take advantage of all the opportunities that a postsecondary education has to offer at IUB. Part of this commitment includes connecting pre-college students and their families to various programs on-campus that help make the college transition to IU as smooth as possible. http://collegeready.indiana.edu

* The IU Balfour Scholars Program (BSP) pre-college academy is an initiative designed to increase higher education access and success for underrepresented minority high school students. While at IUB, students attend sessions focused on becoming a better scholar, managing finances, completing a degree on time, and exploring and planning for a career. http://p16.education.indiana.edu/projects/current/balfour/index.html

* The IU Office of the Vice Provost for Diversity and Inclusion (OVPDI) develops, encourages, and facilitates programming related to diversity issues at IU, and encourages recruitment of underrepresented students, faculty and staff. http://provost.indiana.edu/ovpdi/index.html

* The IU African American Arts Institute (AAAI) is a performing arts program that focuses on the rich and varied traditions of African American heritage. The institute consists of three ensembles: 1) African American Choral Ensemble, 2) African American Dance Company, and 3) Soul Revue. The institute also host summer camps for underrepresented high school students. http://www.indiana.edu/~aaai

* The IU Getting You into IU (GU2IU) is a multi-day recruitment program that brings underrepresented and minority prospective Ph.D. and M.F.A. applicants to Indiana University Bloomington to learn about the programs they are interested in applying and to get a first-hand view of the campus and community. IU pays all the costs of the visit, including lodging, transportation, meals, and travel to and from the airport. The program is open to underrepresented and minority undergraduate seniors and master’s students interested in applying to specific Ph.D. and M.F.A programs.

All of these initiatives include awards and fellowships, recruitment support, and mentoring and community building programming. Examples include the President's Diversity Recruitment Fellowship, the President's Diversity Dissertation Year Fellowship, and the Diversity Doctoral Scholar Program. The annual Innovators and Trailblazers Seminar Series hosts a speaker whose research highlights different factors that enable or inhibit the success of URM graduate students, and the Compact for Diversity runs an annual Institute on Teaching and Mentoring that brings together undergraduates, graduates, and postdocs for workshops and networking with other URM scholars. For information on these and other programs, please visit

http://graduate.indiana.edu/doc/shared/presidents-diversity-initiatives-brochure.pdf or http://diveristy.iu.edu

Faculty

Faculty search committees must themselves be diverse; women and minority members should be included according to IU's Academic Recruitment and Search Guide, titled "Achieving a Diverse Faculty."

Position announcements must "stress Indiana University's commitment to diversity and add wording indicating the person in the position will need to interact with a diverse student and faculty community."

All Position Announcements include inclusive language.

http://www.indiana.edu/~affirm/pdf/Publications/search_guide.pdf

The IU Bloomington Campus Diversity plan has several stated objectives for improving diversity among faculty. These include:

- Increase diversity within major administrative support areas of the campus.

- Recruit and retain minority faculty members, as is done through the Office of Strategic Hiring and Support (SHS), the Office of Academic Support and Diversity (OSAD), the Office of Affirmative Action.

- Sharpen the campus’ diversity vision by streamlining, coordinating, and organizing the way departments hire, support, and retain faculty members.

Staff

The IU Office of the Provost & Executive Vice President has established the IU Office of the Vice Provost for Diversity and Inclusion (OVPDI) in 2017 to recruit diverse faculyu and staff from underrepresented groups. Specifically, IU OVPDI has hired an Associate Vice Provost for Institutional Diversity, Dr. Dionne Danns, who currently overseas the recruitment strategy to bring new faculty and staff to IU Bloomington.

As a result of a recent third-party audit of IU's diversity measures, IU is in the process of examining existing staff recruitment measures and increasing those measures.

Existing measures includes policies for Fair Treatment in the Workplace (including a bias-free environment), and Affirmative Action Recruitment. Additionally, all supervisors must attend Equal Opportunity Employment training. (https://expand.iu.edu/browse/e-training/hr/courses/hr-iub-eeo)

Human resources policies can be viewed here: http://policies.iu.edu/policies/categories/human-resources/index.shtml

Further, the IU Bloomington Professional Council (BPC), which represents staff and advocates for hiring processes, includes a representative from the IU Office of the Vice President for Diversity, Equity, and Multicultural Affairs (OVPDEMA). The IU OVPDEMA strives to foster an inclusive environment that promotes and nurtures diversity, broadly defined, on all campuses of Indiana University. To fulfill its mission, the office strategically focuses on the recruitment and retention of faculty, staff and students; the promotion of a welcoming and positive campus climate; and engagement in outreach and advocacy locally and nationally. The 2017-2018 IU OVPDEMA Annual Report can be downloaded at http://diversity.iu.edu/doc/annual_report_2018.pdf


Does the institution have mentoring, counseling, peer support, academic support, or other programs designed specifically to support students from underrepresented groups on campus?:
Yes

Does the institution have mentoring, counseling, peer support or other programs designed specifically to support academic staff from underrepresented groups on campus?:
Yes

Does the institution have mentoring, counseling, peer support or other programs to support non-academic staff from underrepresented groups on campus?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s programs designed specifically to support students, academic staff, and/or non-academic staff from underrepresented groups:

Indiana University Bloomington was honored with a 2017 Institutional Excellence Award by the National Association of Diversity Officers in Higher Education.

The organization presents this award to recognize institutions of higher education that have “demonstrated measurable progress in promoting and sustaining innovative diversity efforts within their campus community.”

From 2015 to 2017, Indiana University underwent a university-wide, objective and comprehensive diversity assessment, conducted by external consultants Halualani & Associates. The independent firm found that over the last five years, IU Bloomington initiated nearly 2,000 diversity and inclusion efforts.

U Bloomington received a 2016 Higher Education Excellence in Diversity Award from Insight Into Diversity Magazine, the oldest and largest diversity-focused publication in higher education, and was included on the 2016 “Best of the Best” list as one of the nation’s top 30 LGBTQ campuses by Campus Pride, a national nonprofit network devoted to improving life for LGBTQ students in the U.S.

Indiana University Bloomington has many affinity groups and support programs to support under-represented groups on campus.

Such groups include:

*Academic Support Centers: offer a wide range of free services, including tutoring, advising, workshops, review sessions and other academic support.

* African American Arts Institute: Performing arts program that focuses on the rich and varied traditions of African American heritage. The institute funded by IU OVPDEMA consists of three ensembles: 1) African American Choral Ensemble, 2) African American Dance Company, and 3) Soul Revue. http://www.indiana.edu/~aaai
* Archives of African American Music and Culture: A group devoted to establishing a unique collection of primary and secondary source materials on African-American music and culture where such materials are scarce or nonexistent.

* Asian Culture Center: Provides a home for all students interested in Asian cultures.

* Black Film Center/Archive: The Black Film Center/Archive was established in 1981 as a repository of films and related materials by and about African Americans.

* Communication and Culture, Department of: Explores the cultural dimensions and implications of communication practices from oral and written language, to film, television, and digital media.

*Center for Excellence for Women In Technology (CEWiT) has a mentor/mentee program (student mentees may be partnered with a faculty OR staff mentor), an annual symposium, professional development opportunities for faculty, staff, and students, job boards, annual free head-shots for faculty, staff, and students, and other resources aimed to support women in the traditionally male-dominated tech sector.

* First Nations Educational & Cultural Center: Provides educational programs, recruitment and support for Native American students.

*The Faculty and Staff for Student Excellence Mentoring Program (FASE): provides faculty, staff, and peer mentors, and a variety of cultural and social activities.

*Groups Scholars Program: supports, retains, and increases the graduation rates of first-generation, low-income, and disabled students by helping them adjust to university life.

* Helene G. Simon Hillel Center ("Jewish home away from home"): Dedicated to assuring that Jewish college students have opportunities to recognize and develop their leadership potential and to express their Jewishness in many traditional and creative ways.

*The Hudson & Holland Scholars Program: provides financial and educational support to academically talented undergraduate students from traditionally underrepresented minority populations at IU Bloomington. HHSP focuses specifically on students pursuing degrees in biology, chemistry, computer science, mathematics, or physics.

* International Center, Leo R. Dowling: Acts as a link between international students, international student organizations and the Indiana University Bloomington community.

* Islamic Center of Bloomington: Provides a mosque for Islamic students.

* La Casa Latino Cultural Center: Purpose is to achieve through educational and social programs, a greater historical, political and cultural awareness regarding Latina/os.

* Mentoring Services and Leadership Development, Office of: makes available a variety of mentoring services and initiatives to support student success, with special emphasis in working on behalf of students from under-represented and/or under-served populations.

* Neal-Marshall Black Culture Center: Focused on supporting the teaching, research, and service missions of the university, while also providing a positive and hospitable social environment for African American and African students, faculty, and staff.

* IU 21st Century Scholars Program: Provides academic and social support for all students who receive the Indiana 21st Century Scholarship at IUB funded by the Indiana Commission for Higher Education (CHE). The scholarship funds low-income Indiana students with up to 4 years of tuition at IUB. http://21centuryscholars.indiana.edu

* IU Office of the Vice Provost for Diversity and Inclusion (OVPDI): Develops, encourages, and facilitates programming related to diversity issues, and support services for students, faculty and staff of diverse ethnicities.

* IU OVPDEMA Overseas Studies and Scholarship Program: Provides overseas scholarships to underrepresented students within OVPDEMA (21st Century Scholars, Groups Scholars, Hudson & Holland Scholars). Study abroad programs include both faculty-led study abroad programs and custom-designed programs created by OVPDEMA. http://ovpdemaoverseas.indiana.edu

* IU Thomas I. Atkins Living Learning Center: Provides underrepresented groups a supportive living environment where students serve others, study African American culture and history and succeed academically at IUB.

* Groups Scholars Alumni Association: Provides alumni from the IU Groups Scholars Program to remain in touch with other Groups Scholars alumni through professional and social events.

Faculty and Staff:
The Employee Assistance Program provides professional, confidential counseling to faculty and staff free of charge. http://www.indiana.edu/~uhrs/benefits/eap.html
The Office of International Services provides counseling to faculty, staff, and students, in addition to financial resources where legally permissible, to faculty, staff, and students experiences difficulty in language barriers, immigration-related legal concerns, and transition difficulties.

The LGBTQ+ Culture Center offers support to faculty, staff, and students, including counseling, safe space, and mental health assistance. http://glbt.indiana.edu/resources/index.php


Does the institution have training and development programs, teaching fellowships and/or other programs that specifically aim to support and prepare students from underrepresented groups for careers as faculty members?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s programs to support and prepare students from underrepresented groups for careers as faculty members:

IU has a number of programs aimed at preparing future faculty. Every year, IU hosts a free, day-long Preparing Future Faculty Conference (http://www.indiana.edu/~pffc/).

Future Faculty Teaching Fellowships (FFTF) are also available that enable advanced IU Bloomington doctoral and M.F.A. students to enhance their career preparation by teaching and experiencing faculty life in
a different academic setting.
https://facet.indiana.edu/events-programs/future-faculty-teaching-institute.shtml

Both of these preparing future faculty programs are open to all graduate students to participate (PFFC) or to apply (FFTF). In terms of helping to increase the diversity of higher education faculty, there are additional programs specifically for underrepresented graduate students. The President’s Diversity Initiatives seek to
broaden participation of underrepresented minority (URM) students pursuing M.F.A. and Ph.D. degrees at Indiana University. The URM designation applies to racial, ethnic, gender, and disability classifications.

These initiatives include awards and fellowships, recruitment support, and mentoring and community building programming. Examples include the President's Diversity Recruitment Fellowship, the President's Diversity Dissertation Year Fellowship, and the Diversity Doctoral Scholar Program. The annual Innovators and Trailblazers Seminar Series hosts a speaker whose research highlights different factors that enable or inhibit the success of URM graduate students, and the Compact for Diversity runs an annual Institute on Teaching and Mentoring that brings together undergraduates, graduates, and postdocs for workshops and networking with other URM scholars. For information on these and other programs, please visit:
http://graduate.indiana.edu/doc/shared/presidents-diversity-initiatives-brochure.pdf

The Faculty Mentoring Initiatives was implemented in January 2016, and more than 100 faculty members are already serving as mentors to nearly 150 students. Part of IU Bloomington’s Mentoring Services and Leadership Development Program, a unit within the Office of the Vice President for Diversity, Equity, and Multicultural Affairs (OVPDEMA), the program aims to enhance undergraduate student retention and timely degree completion through faculty mentoring students one-on-one or in small groups via email, phone, in person and at large group events with campus partners. Mentors and protégés will determine when, where, how often, and for how long they will meet during the semester, while faculty will receive support from the Faculty Mentoring Initiatives staff.


Does the institution produce a publicly accessible inventory of gender-neutral bathrooms on campus?:
Yes

Does the institution offer housing options to accommodate the special needs of transgender and transitioning students?:
Yes

Website URL where information about the institution’s support for underrepresented groups is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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IU's LGBT Student Support Services office has a Google map of gender-inclusive restrooms that is updated regularly: https://www.google.com/maps/d/u/0/viewer?mid=1RNwb6-OnW_bzbP_8VUtlaGyUNKXNeJkk&ll=39.17178939750591%2C-86.51687320000002&z=16

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.