Overall Rating Silver
Overall Score 46.07
Liaison Akrivi Papadaki
Submission Date April 30, 2020

STARS v2.2

George Brown College
OP-11: Sustainable Procurement

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 1.25 / 3.00 Stephanie Foster
Green Team/Sustainability Coordinator
George Brown College
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have written policies, guidelines, or directives that seek to support sustainable purchasing across multiple commodity categories institution-wide?:
Yes

A copy of the policies, guidelines or directives:
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The policies, guidelines or directives:

Green Purchasing Policy

I. Preamble:
George Brown College is committed to reducing the environmental impacts of its operations and moving towards environmentally sustainable campus practices. As such, it recognizes that there are environmental impacts associated with the College’s purchasing decisions, including “upstream” impacts related to the extraction of natural resources, manufacturing, transportation and packaging, and “downstream” in the final disposal, recycling or re-use of products.

II. Application:
Provided that the pricing, quality and other criteria are the same, preference will be given to products / services that are proven to be environmentally preferable.

When making purchasing decisions, a life-cycle cost analysis should also take into account factors such as operating and energy costs, maintenance, consumable supplies, disposal and recycling costs, when selecting products.
III. Green Purchasing Definition
Green Purchasing is the purchase of goods and services that are environmentally preferable. It includes the purchase of products that have a lesser or reduced effect on human health and the environment when compared with competing products that serve the same purpose.
When determining whether a product is environmentally preferable all phases of a
product’s life cycle will be considered, including raw materials acquisition, production, manufacturing, packaging, distribution, operation, maintenance, disposal, potential for
reuse and ability to be recycled.
IV. Environmental Attributes:

The following environmental attributes are considered preferable:

• Biodegradable/Compostable: The ability of a substance to decompose in the natural environment.

• Chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-free: CFC’s are compounds that contain carbon, chlorine, fluorine and have been used as refrigerants, cleaning solvents, aerosol propellants and in the manufacture of plastic foams.

• Durable: As opposed to single use or disposable, a product that remains useful and usable for a long time without noticeable deterioration in performance.

• Energy efficient: A product that is in the upper 25 percent of energy efficiency
for all similar products. (See also Section V. Product Specific Green Recommendations regarding Energy Star appliances and equipment.)

Heavy metal and persistent, bio-accumulative toxin (PBT)-free free: No lead, mercury, or cadmium content; no mercury, dioxins or PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls).

• Locally or regionally manufactured in order to reduce the environmental costs associated with shipping.

• Low volatile organic compound (VOC) content: VOC’s are chemicals found in paints, adhesives, glues, textiles and furnishing materials that that readily evaporate and contribute to the formation of air pollution when released into the atmosphere. Many VOCs are classified as toxic and carcinogenic. (See also Section V. Product Specific Green Recommendations regarding Furniture.)

• Made from recycled materials with a maximum of post-consumer content (by-products recovered or diverted from the solid waste stream).

• Made from raw materials obtained in a sustainable, environmental sound manner.

• Non-toxic, minimally toxic and carcinogen-free.

• Recyclable: A product that after its intended end use can be diverted from the solid waste stream for use as a raw material in another product.

• Reduced packaging

• Upgradeable: The ability to increase a product’s performance or features
without replacing the product.

• Water efficient: A product that is in the upper 25 percent of water efficiency for all similar products


Does the institution employ Life Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA) when evaluating energy- and water-using products and systems?:
No

Which of the following best describes the institution’s use of LCCA?:
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A brief description of the LCCA policy and/or practices:
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Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating chemically intensive products and services?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for chemically intensive products and services:

GREEN CLEANING STANDARD
- George Brown College -

Preamble
In line with George Brown College’s Green Plan, the goal of the College is to demonstrate best environmental sustainability practices in terms of the products and processes used in the College's Housekeeping program and thus ensure a college environment with indoor air quality that is comfortable, clean and safe.

From a health and safety perspective, the College’s goal is to meet the Association of Physical Plant Administrators (APPA) Cleanliness Standard of 2.0. The College works to promote the highest standards and best practices in terms of Infection Prevention Control (IPAC) and at the Waterfront Campus the cleaning program for clinical areas meets the criteria set out by the Ontario Health Care Housekeeping Association.
Purpose:
Green Cleaning is meant to provide improved health and safety, increase productivity, and improve indoor air quality in every building. The intent is to reduce the exposure of building occupants and maintenance personnel to chemicals and particulate contaminants which adversely affect indoor air quality, human health, and the environment.

Scope:
This Green Cleaning Standard applies to all cleaning services carried out by College staff and service contractors, on College owned premises, including all three campus.

Goals and Strategies:
• Educate, train and motivate staff to work in an environmentally responsible manner; ensure that custodial staff is aware of the benefits and proper use of green cleaning products and aware of their responsibilities in applying this standard.

• All cleaning products used are to be certified environmentally friendly by either Eco-Logo or Green Seal with certain site specific exceptions where chemically assisted cleaning will be required.

• Tissue paper products and plastic bags will be certified environmentally friendly by either Eco-Logo or Green Seal. Alternative, non-forest based paper products, will be considered on a case by case basis to evaluate their environmental impacts.

• Hand soaps will be certified environmentally friendly by either Eco-Logo or Green Seal and contain no anti-microbial agents except where required by health codes and other regulations (e.g., food services and health care requirements).

• Other cleaning processes will reduce impacts on the environment such as the use of steam cleaning which uses no chemicals and minimizes water consumption.

• Develop a complimentary, comprehensive Green Housekeeping Program and operating procedures that would apply to all cleaning service contractors and cleaning staff. Green Housekeeping is the process of cleaning for a healthier workplace using cleaning products and techniques to improve the indoor air quality and the overall health of the workplace.


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating consumable office products?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for consumable office products:

George Brown College Paper Purchasing and Use Policy

George Brown College is committed to reducing the environmental impacts of its facilities and operations by conserving resources and reducing waste. In line with this commitment, the College has a Green Plan which sets goals for reducing consumption of natural resources including paper. We are concerned about the future of the world’s forests and the environmental impacts of paper production. We are therefore committed to purchasing paper that has been harvested in a sustainable manner and manufactured in mills that minimize their environmental impact. We are also committed to reduce the amount of paper the College uses as one way to reduce our ecologic footprint.

This Policy commits the College to:

1. Use Paper Efficiently: Using paper efficiently is a key first step in reducing the environmental impacts associated with paper use. The College’s Green Plan has set a goal of reducing paper consumption by 15% by 2012.

(See Appendix I: George Brown College Guide for Reducing Paper Consumption for a summary of institutional and personal practices that should be used to increase paper efficiency.)

2. Maximizing Recycled Content: Purchasing post consumer waste (PCW) recycled-content paper and paper products has extensive environmental benefits and will encourage suppliers to increase their capabilities in providing these products.

- At a minimum, and where suitable, all College publications will use paper with 75% recycled content, including 30% post-consumer waste PCW recycled content. As affordable and suitable paper with higher PCW content becomes available, the College will utilize it.

- At a minimum, purchase photocopy paper that has 30% recycled content.

- Give preference to paper and paper products whose recycled content is verified by an independent, third party organization, such as the Forest Stewardship Council.

3. Choosing Responsibly Sourced Paper: The College supports reasonable forest management practices that protect biodiversity, ecosystem integrity and long term benefits to local communities. To promote the use of responsibly sourced fiber in paper and paper products, the College will:

- Give preference to paper and paper products with virgin tree fiber content that is certified by independent, third-party organizations that employ the most environmentally and socially responsible forest management and restoration practices, including the Forest Stewardship Council and the Sustain Forest Initiative.

- Where feasible and time allows, verify supply origins of any virgin fiber content in paper and give preference to suppliers and manufacturers that establish a credible “Chain of Custody” tracking system to identify the origin of fiber sources.

4. Supporting Cleaner Production Practices: The College supports minimizing the environmental impacts of paper production. To encourage cleaner production practices the College will:

- Give preference to paper and paper products processed without chlorine or chlorine compounds (i.e. process-chlorine-free or PCF paper) as long as they meet recycled content goals. Maria to check, it may be that we’ll need to change this.

- Avoid paper coatings such as varnish and opt for aqueous coatings instead whenever possible.

- Use vegetable-based inks and inks free of toxic metals whenever possible.


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating furniture and furnishings?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for furniture and furnishings:
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Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating Information technology (IT) and equipment?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for Information Technology (IT) and equipment:
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Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating food service providers?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for food service providers:

Sustainability Vision Content for 2019 Food Services RFP:

One of the strategic commitments in George Brown College’s Vision 2030 is that sustainability should be foundational to the success of the College with the goal that we demonstrate “behaviours, actions and policies that lead to environmental, financial and social sustainability". Our Sustainability Plan 2022 also lays out steps for the College to reduce its carbon footprint and lead by example. Beyond recycling and composting, the food service should clearly demonstrate a commitment to sustainability across all of its domains – environmental, social and financial.

Local and sustainable procurement of food is an important strategy to reduce an institution’s carbon footprint while having positive effects on the local economy, the environment, and the community. Food service providers should be prepared to suggest creative ways to emphasize local, sustainable and Fair Trade food procurement while managing costs and addressing barriers such as related to tracking, measuring and reporting food purchases.

Food waste and use of single use plastics are huge environmental concerns with the need to shift to a circular economy being addressed in Toronto’s Long Term Waste Management Strategy, the provincial Strategy for a Waste Free Ontario and the Government of Canada’s plans to ban single use plastics as early as 2020. Locally, the City of Toronto is currently undertaking consultations to help develop a strategy to reduce the use of single-use and takeaway items in Toronto.

Food service providers should be prepared to innovate and suggest strategies to help George Brown College address these difficult sustainability challenges.

It is expected that the College’s food services will measure and report on its sustainable practices through procurement policies and decisions, by preventing food waste and diverting food materials from the waste stream, by making low impact dining options available, by demonstrating a commitment to social justice and equity, and by educating its customers about more sustainable options and practices.


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating garments and linens?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for garments and linens:
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Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating professional service providers?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for professional service providers:
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Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating transportation and fuels?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for transportation and fuels:
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Website URL where information about the institution’s sustainable procurement program or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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