Overall Rating Silver
Overall Score 46.07
Liaison Akrivi Papadaki
Submission Date April 30, 2020

STARS v2.2

George Brown College
EN-10: Community Partnerships

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 3.00 / 3.00 Kizzie Bedeau
Director
Community Partnerships Office
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Name of the institution’s formal community partnership to advance sustainability :
Good Food Market

Does the institution provide financial or material support for the partnership? :
Yes

Which of the following best describes the partnership timeframe?:
Multi-year or ongoing

Which of the following best describes the partnership?:
Sustainability-focused

Are underrepresented groups and/or vulnerable populations engaged as equal partners? :
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s formal community partnership to advance sustainability:

The Good Food Market (GFM) at George Brown College is a non-profit initiative of the Academic Upgrading Program through the support of FoodShare. The GFM strives to offer access to fresh food at affordable prices for the college community. Beyond simply selling produce, the GFM seeks to be a hub for connecting, learning and organizing around something that connects us all: food. This market is held every Thursday 2 to 4 in room 356E at the St James Campus at George Brown College located at 200 King St E Toronto. Everyone is welcome.
FoodShare works in partnership with community organizations and neighbourhood leaders to run the markets, and delivers top-quality fresh produce purchased from local farmers and the Ontario Food Terminal on market day. We pass on tools, training and ongoing support to community partners and residents who manage all operational aspects of the market. At the George Brown location the market is run by interns and volunteer students and is overseen by a faculty member.
MISSION
The Good Food Market at George Brown College exists to:
•Increase the college community’s access to fresh food at affordable prices
•Become a vibrant gathering space for the college community at large
•Increase food literacy: knowledge and skills associated with food such as how to select, prepare and consume
healthy foods
•Build connections with other Community Food Security initiatives on and off campus
•Offer volunteer, field placement and learning opportunities to students
https://goodfoodmarketgbc.wordpress.com/about/


Name of the institution’s formal community partnership to advance sustainability (2nd partnership):
School to College to Work Initiative (SCWI)

Does the institution provide financial or material support for the partnership? (2nd partnership):
Yes

Which of the following best describes the partnership timeframe? (2nd partnership):
Multi-year or ongoing

Which of the following best describes the partnership’s sustainability focus? (2nd partnership):
Sustainability-related

Are underrepresented groups and/or vulnerable populations engaged as equal partners? (2nd partnership):
No

A brief description of the institution’s formal community partnership to advance sustainability (2nd partnership):

The School to College to Work Initiative (SCWI) is a co-operative effort with a mandate to assist in creating a transition for at risk students from secondary school to college. In addition to a wide array of learning and awareness opportunities for students, teachers, parents and the broader community, projects have been developed to provide dual credit programs for secondary students through the partnership of secondary schools and colleges. SCWI demonstrates remarkable success in inspiring at risk students to complete their high school diploma and continue in career oriented postsecondary education. (Note the Ontario Ministry of Education defines “at risk” as those students from historically under-represented groups who have a higher risk of not succeeding in post-secondary education. This includes disengaged and underachieving students with the potential to succeed but who are at risk of not graduating from high school, and students who have left high school before graduating.)

The CPO has been participating in the School to College to Work initiative since 2008. In the early years, the Community Partnerships Office averaged 100 dual credit course participants and 300 student participants in reach ahead activities. Today, the CPO averages 800 – 900 dual credit program participants per year, and roughly 500 students register in reach ahead activities.
The CPO offers 4 programs within the initiative:
• The Dual Credit program is intended to assist secondary school students in their completion of their Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) and successfully transition to college and apprenticeship programs. Students take a college course and receive both a high-school credit and college credit upon successful completion.
• The School Within A College program in partnership with Toronto District School Board (TDSB), Toronto Catholic District School Board (TCDSB) and George Brown College to offer secondary students the opportunity to earn secondary school credits and dual credit ‘General Education’ college credits with the goal for students to complete their Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) and transition to post-secondary destinations. The primary focus is on students facing challenges in graduating and who have the potential to succeed in college. Courses are delivered by Secondary School Teachers and College Instructors
• The Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program (OYAP) allows students in Grades 11 & 12 to explore apprenticeship options in a skilled trade career
• Reach-Ahead Activities / Forums – O\one-day, hands-on activities for secondary students and accompanying teachers, at the college. Activities are experiential and aimed at increasing awareness of college programming


Name of the institution’s formal community partnership to advance sustainability (3rd partnership):
Building Owners and Manager Association (BOMA) SMART Education Council

Does the institution provide financial or material support for the partnership? (3rd partnership):
Yes

Which of the following best describes the partnership timeframe? (3rd partnership):
Multi-year or ongoing

Which of the following best describes the partnership? (3rd partnership):
Sustainability-related

Are underrepresented groups and/or vulnerable populations engaged as equal partners? (3rd partnership):
No

A brief description of the institution’s formal community partnership to advance sustainability (3rd partnership):

Dr. Rick Huijbregts, George Brown College VP of Strategy and Innovation is part of the Building Owners and Manager Association (BOMA) SMART education council: looking at ways to education GTA real estate developers and operators on smart and sustainable practices. In 2019, BOMA Toronto released a Technical Guidance Note to help managers of commercial real estate to consider resilience and risks imposed by extreme weather. The Note, called Resilience in the Commercial Real Estate Industry – Designing for a Graceful & Survivable Future, was carried out in collaboration with the City of Toronto and its efforts to develop a Resilient Strategy.
To access the note, please visit https://cdn.ymaws.com/www.bomatoronto.org/resource/resmgr/2019/Resilience_Guide_Book_Final.pdf


A brief description of the institution’s other community partnerships to advance sustainability:
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Website URL where information about the institution’s community partnerships to advance sustainability is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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Oct 1:
Updated partnership #1 to Sustainability-Focused and added partnership #3.

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