Overall Rating Expired
Overall Score Expired
Liaison Tracy Edwards
Submission Date June 12, 2016
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

Frostburg State University
OP-27: Rainwater Management

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete Expired John Brewer
AD of planning & Construction
Physical Plant Department
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution use Low Impact Development (LID) practices as a matter of policy or standard practice to reduce rainwater/stormwater runoff volume and improve outgoing water quality for new construction, major renovation, and other projects?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s Low Impact Development (LID) practices:

Frostburg State University is mandated by the State of Maryland to perform Storm Water Management practices for new construction and major renovations. Additionally, any new buildings over 10,000 sf are mandated to be LEED certified. Part of the LEED certification is providing the best practices for rainwater (Storm Water) management.

There are fourteen storm water facilities on the campus. All of these facilities are water quality facilities, meaning that they are designed to provide infiltration of rain water back into the earth.

The latest building at Frostburg State is the CCIT Building. The CCIT building has a “green” roof. There is over an acre of plants growing on this green roof. Additionally, all the rain water collected from the roof runs into a storm water management infiltration facility.

There are two rain gardens on campus. The water supply to the rain gardens comes from .75 acres of existing roofs. The rain water is piped from the building down spouts to the rain gardens. What water is not used by the plants in the rain garden infiltrates back into the earth.

In the fall of 2015, a joint storm water management project with the local Soil Conservation Service, Allegany County Engineering Department, the City of Frostburg, and FSU was completed. This project focused on constructing a 5 acres storm water management pond that treats storm water from 103 acres of land from the City of Frostburg and Frostburg State University. Prior to the project, the storm water from these 103 acres was discharged into Sand Spring Run. Now, the storm water is treated for water quality before it infiltrates back into the earth and is discharged into Sand Spring Run.

In 2005, FSU performed a comprehensive survey of the sanitary sewer and storm drain systems on campus. From this survey, it was learned that there were a few cross overs of sanitary sewer and storm drain lines. This meant that some of the sewer lines were discharging into the storm drain system and some of the storm water was being discharged in the sanitary sewer system. From 2006 to 2008, these cross over issues were resolved by various construction projects. Now, there are no cross overs. Additionally, during these construction projects some of the down spouts and drainage pipes that discharged into the storm drain system were moved. This was practiced where the drainpipes were on the down slope side of the buildings. The water now discharges onto the ground and is able to infiltrate back into the earth naturally.


Has the institution adopted a rainwater/stormwater management policy, plan, or strategies that mitigate the rainwater runoff impacts of ongoing campus operations through the use of green infrastructure? :
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s rainwater/stormwater management policy, plan, and/or strategies for ongoing campus operations:

Frostburg State University is mandated by the State of Maryland to perform Storm Water Management practices for new construction and major renovations. Additionally, any new buildings over 10,000 sf are mandated to be LEED certified. Part of the LEED certification is providing the best practices for rainwater (Storm Water) management.


A brief description of any rainwater harvesting employed by the institution:

There are fourteen storm water facilities on the campus. All of these facilities are water quality facilities, meaning that they are designed to provide infiltration of rain water back into the earth.

The latest building at Frostburg State is the CCIT Building. The CCIT building has a “green” roof. There is over an acre of plants growing on this green roof. Additionally, all the rain water collected from the roof runs into a storm water management infiltration facility.

There are two rain gardens on campus. The water supply to the rain gardens comes from .75 acres of existing roofs. The rain water is piped from the building down spouts to the rain gardens. What water is not used by the plants in the rain garden infiltrates back into the earth.

In the fall of 2015, a joint storm water management project with the local Soil Conservation Service, Allegany County Engineering Department, the City of Frostburg, and FSU was completed. This project focused on constructing a 5 acres storm water management pond that treats storm water from 103 acres of land from the City of Frostburg and Frostburg State University. Prior to the project, the storm water from these 103 acres was discharged into Sand Spring Run. Now, the storm water is treated for water quality before it infiltrates back into the earth and is discharged into Sand Spring Run.


Rainwater harvested directly and stored/used by the institution, performance year:
50000 Gallons

A brief description of any rainwater filtering systems employed by the institution to treat water prior to release:

There are fourteen storm water facilities on the campus. All of these facilities are water quality facilities, meaning that they are designed to provide infiltration of rain water back into the earth.


A brief description of any living or vegetated roofs on campus:

The latest building at Frostburg State is the CCIT Building. The CCIT building has a “green” roof. There is over an acre of plants growing on this green roof. Additionally, all the rain water collected from the roof runs into a storm water management infiltration facility.


A brief description of any porous (i.e. permeable) paving employed by the institution:

FSU and partner agency, Western Maryland Resource Conservation and Development Council, in their Frostburg Grows project, constructed a pervious concrete demonstration system funded by a grant from the Chesapeake Bay Trust.


A brief description of any downspout disconnection employed by the institution:
---

A brief description of any rain gardens on campus:

There are two rain gardens on campus. The water supply to the rain gardens comes from .75 acres of existing roofs. The rain water is piped from the building down spouts to the rain gardens. What water is not used by the plants in the rain garden infiltrates back into the earth.


A brief description of any stormwater retention and/or detention ponds employed by the institution:

There are three retention ponds have been developed to improve water quality from impervious areas.


A brief description of any bioswales on campus (vegetated, compost or stone):

These swales are used to control storm water that comes from off campus.


A brief description of any other rainwater management technologies or strategies employed by the institution:

FSU and partner agency, Western Maryland Resource Conservation and Development Council, in their Frostburg Grows project, constructed a rainwater collection system where the water captured is used for irrigation of food crops in high tunnel greenhouses. Rain is collected both from the covers of the high tunnels and via a network of French drains across the site, which is a former strip mine. This French drain system and associated 40,000 gallon irrigation pond were funded by a grant from the Chesapeake Bay Trust.


The website URL where information about the institution’s rainwater management initiatives, plan or policy is available:

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.