Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 65.91
Liaison Elizabeth Swiman
Submission Date Dec. 19, 2018
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

Florida State University
EN-1: Student Educators Program

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 3.77 / 4.00 Jamie Valentine
Partnerships Coordinator
Sustainable Campus
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Number of students enrolled for credit (headcount):
41,900

Total number of students enrolled for credit that are served (i.e. directly targeted) by a student peer-to-peer sustainability outreach and education program (avoid double-counting to the extent feasible):
39,439

Percentage of students served by a peer-to-peer educator program:
94.13

Name of the student educators program:
Eco-Reps

Number of students served (i.e. directly targeted) by the program (headcount):
6,733

A brief description of the program, including examples of peer-to-peer outreach activities:

Eco-Reps are student ambassadors charged with increasing sustainable behaviors at FSU through peer-to-peer education. Eco-Reps participate in bi-monthly sustainability education from the Eco-Reps student coordinator, highlighting a different issue each month. Eco-Reps take what they have learned to their residence halls and develop peer-to-peer programs to engage students in fun sustainability-themed programs. Eco-Reps table at various campus events and conduct food waste audits in the dining halls to reach a diverse audience. Some examples of the successful peer-to-peer outreach events from the year include the “Solutions Through STEM” Dinner Dialogue where students learned from STEM professionals through round table discussions. The Eco-Reps and Social Justice Living Learning Community ventured to Ripe City Urban Farm to deepen the conversation about the intersection of sustainability and social justice using Tallahassee as a case study. Eco-Reps also hosted a cooking class and Spring Harvest at the Seminole Organic Garden. Both the cooking class and the spring harvest utilized herbs grown at the student garden to engage conversations about where food comes from, reasons to reduce meat consumption, and issues around food access.


A brief description of how the student educators are selected:

Eco-Reps are selected a number of ways:
1. Through Inter-Residence Hall Council (IRHC) elections: one Eco-Rep per residence hall complex
2. Second year Eco-Reps are part of the leadership board
3. Students living off campus attend meetings and volunteer at events
4. Invitation by Sustainable Campus staff or student coordinator


A brief description of the formal training that the student educators receive to prepare them to conduct peer outreach:

Eco-Reps elected through IRHC are asked to attend IRHC-U, an all-day intensive orientation where Eco -Reps to learn how to maximize their connection to both IRHC and Sustainable Campus resources. Eco-Reps also attend the Eco-Reps Retreat to learn about sustainability and plan program goals for the year. Throughout the year, Eco-Reps attend bi-monthly meetings to become familiar with a specific sustainability topic, with each month dedicated to a different issue. Typically, the first meeting of the month is a case study while the second is activity based. With guidance from the Sustainable Campus Program Coordinator, Eco-Reps plan programming and sustainability themed events across campus. The entire program focuses on developing leadership and a diverse understanding of sustainability.


A brief description of the financial and/or administrative support the institution provides to the program (e.g. annual budget and/or faculty/staff coordination):

FSU Facilities provides the financial support for the Eco-Reps program staff as well as provides funds for events and necessary educational materials. Sustainable Campus, funded through Facilities, provides the day to day operations of the program via two main student staff with high level oversight by the Program Coordinator:
● Campus Sustainability Graduate Assistant
○ Develops pre and post assessments to measure student engagement and creates a mentor/support system to meet with student program coordinator to provide guidance for Eco-Reps.
● Student Program Coordinator
○ The Eco-Reps student coordinator is the program lead and oversees Eco-Reps recruitment and maintain regular communication with volunteers. The student program coordinator plans meetings and outreach events as well as oversees general operation of the bi-monthly meetings and trainings. The student program coordinator also maintains regular communication with our close partner organization, the IRHC Executive Board to make the most of Eco-Reps belonging to Sustainable Campus and Hall Council.


Name of the student educators program (2nd program):
Service Leadership Seminar

Number of students served (i.e. directly targeted) by the program (2nd program):
66

A brief description of the program, including examples of peer-to-peer outreach activities (2nd program):

The Service Leadership Seminar is a unique experience for incoming freshman at Florida State University. The weeklong event is held before the start of fall semester at no cost for students. The seminar provides an opportunity to learn about community service, identity and leadership. During the week, students participate in community service projects, workshops, speakers and interaction with current campus leaders. The activities are designed to enable the participants to discover how they can help create positive, sustainable change on Florida State’s campus.


A brief description of how the student educators are selected (2nd program):

Student educators apply to become an SLS facilitator or coordinator and go through an interview process with the staff Program Coordinator.


A brief description of the formal training that the student educators receive to prepare them to conduct peer outreach (2nd program):

Facilitators and coordinators go through weekly trainings regarding the first-year student transition, campus resources available to students, ways to get involved, how to facilitate a small group, emergency protocol, and logistics of the week.


A brief description of the financial and/or administrative support the institution provides to the program (e.g. annual budget and/or faculty/staff coordination) (2nd program):

SLS is funded through the Center for Leadership and Social Change, a program of Student Activities.
https://thecenter.fsu.edu/leadership/service-leadership-seminar


Name of the student educators program (3rd program):
Leadership Learning in the Outdoors for Group and Individual Change

Number of students served (i.e. directly targeted) by the program (3rd program):
50

A brief description of the program, including examples of peer-to-peer outreach activities (3rd program):

Leadership Learning in the Outdoors for Group and Individual Change, better known as Leadership LOGIC, is a two-day overnight leadership development program at no cost to students. Specifically, LOGIC caters to FSU students who have not participated in a leadership development program before. It is a great way to explore leadership knowledge and skills through individual, small group and large group interactions.
Not only do participants learn about leadership development, but they also meet fellow FSU students and participate in engaging activities. Weather permitting, the group will spend most of the weekend outside in hands-on exercises that apply leadership theories.


A brief description of how the student educators are selected (3rd program):

Student educator apply to become a LOGIC facilitator and go through an interview process with the staff Program Coordinator.


A brief description of the formal training that the student educators receive to prepare them to conduct peer outreach (3rd program):

Prior to LOGIC, student educators meet weekly to discuss curriculum and logistic with the staff Program Coordinator. Trainings include the practice of facilitating programs, different leadership development theories, and logistics of the weekend.


A brief description of the financial and/or administrative support the institution provides to the program (e.g. annual budget and/or faculty/staff coordination) (3rd program):

LOGIC is funded through the Center for Leadership and Social Change, a program of Student Activities, in collaboration with Campus Recreation.
https://thecenter.fsu.edu/leadership/logic


A brief description of all other student peer-to-peer sustainability outreach and education programs, including the number of students served and how student educators are selected, trained, and supported by the institution:

Living Learning Communities-Social Justice and Women in STEM
Number of students served (i.e. directly targeted) by the program:
A brief description of the program, including examples of peer-to-peer outreach activities:
Students apply to live in a Living Learning Community (LLC) for their freshman year based on interest and educational pursuits. Students then live together, take specific classes geared toward tier interest together, and participate in events together. Students return to the LLC after their freshman year and serve as peer mentors to new LLC students.
A brief description of how the student educators are selected:
Students apply and go through a rigorous interview process with staff and previous LLC students.
A brief description of the formal training that the student educators receive to prepare them to conduct peer outreach:
Students learn from other peer mentors and faculty advisers including: classes, events, trips, and projects.
A brief description of the financial and/or administrative support the institution provides to the program:
The LLC's are paid for by the college or department that developed the LLC with support from Housing.

Center for Participant Education
Number of students served (i.e. directly targeted) by the program: unknown
A brief description of the program, including examples of peer-to-peer outreach activities:
The Center for Participant Education was established in 1970 to provide an alternative to the traditional curriculum taught at FSU. Students explore socially relevant topics and foster a healthier philosophy of education through classes. The classes are open to anyone who wishes to attend and can be taught by anyone who wishes to teach.
CPE’s Mission:
1) Shall be a forum for progressive and alternative ideas on education, politics and the arts.
2) Shall provide an area where students and local citizens can initiate and enact new programs which interest them.
3) Shall provide guest lectures, movies, classes and other alternative programs to traditional programs.
4) Shall provide these educational classes and programs without charging a fee for instruction.

Participation is open to students, faculty, and staff of Florida State University and the Tallahassee community. Past CPE programs include: Anthroposophy and Bio-dynamics, urban foraging & plant identification tour, suggestions for a safe bike ride, The Real Food Challenge, taboo experiences series, activist training, and the American electoral system.
A brief description of how the student educators are selected:
If anyone is interested in teaching a CPE class, they can email the class title, description, and preferred dates to the program coordinators. Student educators are selected based on submissions.
A brief description of the formal training that the student educators receive:
There is no technical formal training because of the mission of the program but the training/education from each program attended spans a wide range and is typically in a small group setting.
A brief description of the financial or other support the institution provides to the program:
CPE is funded through FSU Student Government Association appropriations.

FSU supports 500+ student organization, many with sustainability themes. All FSU students are able to search for student organizations by interest on Nole Central, an online platform, to engage in peer to peer learning. Many student groups have an organizational structure where returning members can attain leadership positions within the group. Returning students mentor and support new students to the groups, maintaining a cycle of peer to peer education.

These peer to peer student educators’ programs cover topics such as: the environment, sustainability, vegan lifestyle, supporting social justice causes, analyzing social determinants of health, women’s empowerment, biking, multi-cultural experiences, animal rights, volunteering in the local community, mental health through yoga, minority development, global engagement, sustainability and law, outdoor experiences and others.


Total number of hours student educators are engaged in peer-to-peer sustainability outreach and education activities annually (all programs):
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The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.