Overall Rating Expired
Overall Score Expired
Liaison Ali Dutton
Submission Date May 13, 2016
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

Florida International University
PA-2: Sustainability Planning

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete Expired Alexandra Dutton
Program Manager
Office of University Sustainability
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have current and formal plans to advance sustainability in the following areas? Do the plans include measurable objectives?:
Current and Formal Plans (Yes or No) Measurable Objectives (Yes or No)
Curriculum Yes Yes
Research (or other scholarship) No No
Campus Engagement No No
Public Engagement No No
Air and Climate Yes Yes
Buildings Yes Yes
Dining Services/Food Yes No
+ Date Revised: June 3, 2016
Energy Yes Yes
Grounds Yes Yes
Purchasing No No
Transportation No No
Waste Yes Yes
Water Yes Yes
Diversity and Affordability Yes Yes
Health, Wellbeing and Work No
+ Date Revised: June 3, 2016
No
Investment No No
Other --- ---

A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Curriculum:

FIU’s Global Learning for Global Citizenship program is the centerpiece of internationalized undergraduate education on campus. This curricular and co-curricular initiative provides students with multiple opportunities for active, team-based, interdisciplinary exploration of real-world problems.
Capitalizing on FIU’s unique demographics and location in the gateway to the Americas, Global Learning for Global Citizenship enables students to achieve specific learning outcomes: global awareness, global perspective, and global engagement. Sustainability is inherent these topics and is incorporated into the curriculums of the GL courses. More than 160 global learning courses have been developed by faculty in nearly every academic department. Students in global learning courses enhance and extend their scholarship through participation in integrated co-curricular activities.
Ultimately, Global Learning for Global Citizenship is a promise to every FIU student: graduates of the University will be empowered with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes they need to become informed and engaged citizens of the world.
https://goglobal.fiu.edu

The FIU Beyond Possible 2020 Strategic Plan also address sustainability and the environment through its many research centers:

The fragile South Florida ecosystem is a major national point of research, study and concern. FIU enjoys unique opportunities to leverage our tropical location for learning and research that focuses on environmental issues. With the Florida Everglades in our backyard, FIU scientists at the Southeast Environmental Research Center have been at the forefront of Florida Everglades research for more than two decades and have made great strides to restore and build resiliency for this vital ecosystem. Additionally, our academic centers include the International Center for Tropical Botany at The Kampong (the only garden of the National Tropical Botanical Garden outside Hawaii) in Coconut Grove, the Aquarius Reef Base in the Florida Keys, the Wall of Wind at the Engineering Center and the Batchelor Environmental Center (in collaboration with the Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science) at BBC. These initiatives will play an important role moving forward in the development of our preeminent programs and in helping our community enhance community sustainability.

+ Date Revised: June 3, 2016

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Curriculum plan(s):

Global Learning:
As a graduation requirement, the program aims for every graduating student from he university to have taken a minimum of 6 credits from the Global Learning list of courses.
Since the initiative’s launch in 2010, over 35,000 students have taken FIU’s signature global learning courses and participated in a vast array of co-curricular global learning
activities. Every one of these learning experiences are specifically designed
to build our students’:
Global Perspective: Ability to conduct a multi-perspective analysis of local, global, international, and intercultural problems.
Global Awareness: Knowledge of the interconnectedness of local, global, international, and intercultural issues, trends, and systems
Global Engagement: Willingness to engage in local, global, international, and intercultural problem solving.
https://goglobal.fiu.edu

Beyond Possible 2020 Strategic Plan:
GOAL: FIU will identify and support preeminent programs that are directly aligned with the university’s mission and strategic plan and that meet objective criteria that have been identified and agreed upon by university stakeholders.
Strategies
A. Identify key characteristics of preeminent programs.
• Preeminent programs at FIU will:
o align directly with FIU’s mission and strategic plan;
o elevate FIU’s Worlds Ahead initiatives in the arts, environment, globalization and health;
o be locally/nationally/globally recognized and regarded highly;
o leverage strengths, challenges, opportunities and characteristics unique to FIU, Miami-Dade and South Florida;
o partner with external partners as relevant and innovative solution centers for communities and businesses;
o address emerging global challenges and concerns;
o offer state-of-the-art and unique learning and research opportunities;
o provide fertile paths for winning grants or philanthropic dollars;
o enhance the reputation and strengthen the credibility and brand of FIU;
o be cost effective when compared with programs and endeavors of a similar nature; and
o be inclusive, interdisciplinary and sustainable through the collaboration of multiple faculty members across a range of academic ranks and disciplines.

https://president.fiu.edu/download/beyond-possible-2020-strategic-plan2015-2020/

+ Date Revised: June 3, 2016

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Curriculum plan(s):

Office of Global Learning

https://goglobal.fiu.edu/about/


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Research (or other scholarship):
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The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Research plan(s):
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Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Research plan(s):
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A brief description of the plan(s) to advance Campus Engagement around sustainability:
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The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Campus Engagement plan:
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Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Campus Engagement plan(s):
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A brief description of the plan(s) to advance Public Engagement around sustainability:
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The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Public Engagement plan(s):
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Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Public Engagement plan(s):
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A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Air and Climate:

In 2007 FIU committed to working towards carbon neutrality by signing the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment in 2007. Since then FIU has taken significant steps such as creating an Office of University Sustainability, producing a Climate Action Plan, committing to LEED Silver construction standard, inventorying all greenhouse gas emissions every two years, creating an energy conservation plan, completing the STARS report as needed, and many more. All of these work toward the goal of reducing carbon emissions from FIU.

http://gogreen.fiu.edu/climate/greenhouse-gas/index.html


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Air and Climate plan(s):

The Climate Action Plan lays out three reduction scenarios.
1) a reduction of 25% below 2007 levels
2) 20% below 2007 levels
3) 15% below 2007 levels.
All achieve reductions by 2030, with climate neutrality as a goal as soon as possible thereafter. 2020 is another benchmark year. There should be a 10% reduction in emissions by 2020 in all three scenarios. Below is a graph that outlines the reduction scenarios as well as a business as usual track.

it should be noted that this Climate Action Plan is from 2009 and does not accurately reflect the growth and progress FIU has made since then. FIU aims to develop a sustainability strategic plan that would incorporate updated emission reduction targets.

The 2009 Climate Action Plan can be found at: http://gogreen.fiu.edu/_assets/documents/climate/FIU-Climate-Action-Plan-2009.pdf

+ Date Revised: May 26, 2016

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Air and Climate plan(s):

Office of University Sustainability

http://gogreen.fiu.edu/index.html


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Buildings:

The Campus Master Plan addresses Architectural Design Elements for the university.

ELEMENT 15.2
SUSTAINABLE DESIGN GUIDELINES

It is the intent of these guidelines to establish that FIU’s expectations is to build in an environmentally responsible manner which is sensitive to geography, sensitive to energy and resource consumption as well as supporting regional resources and strong local relationships.
These guidelines are aimed to establish direction for a successful outcome of new Buildings.
All buildings at FIU campuses will be required to follow the USGBC guidelines for a minimum LEED level of Silver certification. The criteria outline by the USGBC score card should be utilized and monitored at every phase of project.

All buildings must also meet basic Energy Star criteria and must comply with all the FIU building standards regarding Master plan infrastructure strategies and overall sustainable Campus practices.
The FIU sustainable office must review and comment during all phases of the project to Assure campus wide best practices are being taken into account.

All new buildings must meet all FIU building standard criteria that refers to hurricane preparedness assuring all building systems, envelop and infrastructure strategies are not in conflict or will enhance sustainable criteria, such as with storm water management, and overall water collection systems, day lighting, power redundancies, envelop materials and design.

The following drivers should be taken into consideration:
 Set goals and benchmarks for each building aligned with budget.
Conduct site survey and evaluation of existing conditions
 Analyze various methods of meeting goals and benchmarks and use results to make decisions.
This analysis should be repeated during all phases to further refine and validate
decisions.
Expected outcome must be reviewed and monitored during construction.
 This outcome should be measured to determine success and establish benchmarks
or lessons learned for future projects.

http://facilities.fiu.edu/Documents/Planning/MasterPlans/MasterPlans10_20/CMP_Update_Docs_10_20/CMP_Update_Chapters_10_20/Element_15_Architectural_Design_Guidelines.pdf


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Buildings plan(s):

All buildings at FIU campuses will be required to follow the USGBC guidelines for a minimum LEED level of Silver certification. The criteria outline by the USGBC score card should be utilized and monitored at every phase of project.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Buildings plan(s):

Facilities Management Department

http://facilities.fiu.edu


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Dining Services/Food:

FIU’s food service provider is Aramark who has a company culture of sustainability. While on campus they have worked with the Office of University Sustainability and other departments to put in place sustainable operations and programs. As an Aramark campus, FIU has adopted many of the Green Thread goals and strategies that they have provided for us.
Below are the programs that have been put in place and that we continue to operate and improve upon:

• We Compost: Panther Dining, Aramark Grounds and the Agroecology Program have partnered to make a nutrient-rich soil with pre-consumer food scraps from the dining locations. The compost is used in the organic garden to grow produce sold at the FIU Farmer's Market.
• Recycled Coffee Grounds: Panther Dining and Aramark Grounds have recycled used coffee grounds from Starbucks, Einstein Bros. Bagels and Café Bustelo to be used as a natural fertilizer for campus landscaping needs. While this program is temporarily in hiatus, we look forward to renewing it as it can significantly cut the amount of waste send to our landfills each year and promote a healthier environment on campus!
• Think Clean...Think Green: We use environmentally friendly, Green Seal cleaning supplies. We clean our floors using Blue Cleaning Technology, which is chemical free and only uses an electrically activated water cleaning solution that breaks apart and lifts dirt from surfaces like a magnet.
• Organic Snacks: Want something nutritious, great tasting and organic? Check out our organic selection in the P.O.D Market convenience store. We offer a variety of prepared meals, dried fruits and energy bars.
• Donated Food: We serve our community by donating leftover and unused food to local community organizations. Panther Dining managers also take time to volunteer throughout the year.
• Reduce, Reuse, Recycle: We are working with F.I.U Facilities and the Office of Sustainability to recycle our cardboard, office paper, plastics, glass and pens.
• Feel Good Coffee: Einstein Bros. Bagels and Starbucks use Fair Trade Coffee. This ensures that the coffee bean farmers receive fair market value for their product and encourages future production of a high quality product.
• Reusable Mugs: Get a reusable mug at Starbucks and Einstein's and get a discount on future coffee purchases at each location at the respective location. Go Green - Save Green!
• We Keep Conservation in Mind: We are initiating energy and water conservation programs along with training for managers and employees.
• Our French Fries Can Power a Car: We are partnering with FiltaFry to recycle our used fryer oil into biodiesel.
• Tray-less Dining: The Fresh Food Co. is a tray-less dining facility. Studies show that by removing trays from all-you-can-eat venues, we significantly reduce our washing/rinsing water consumption and reduce food waste by 20%-30%.
• Less Waste on the Go: At The Fresh Food Company, you can purchase a meal to-go in a reusable To-Go box - helping to minimize one-time use of paper and Styrofoam products. The To-Go box has multiple compartments and is dishwasher safe - perfect for the next use!

http://fiu.campusdish.com/Sustainability.aspx

http://www.aramark.com/about-us/corporate-responsibility/environmental-sustainability

+ Date Revised: June 3, 2016

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Dining Services/Food plan(s):

Aramark focuses on 4 key areas to reduce environmental impact:

RESPONSIBLE PURCHASING
The call for locally sourced food and goods that have been responsibly produced has become stronger over the last decade. Aramark's purchasing choices influence our health, our environment and even our local and global economies. That’s why responsible purchasing is a priority for Aramark.

Aramark has taken important steps to make sure purchases are made in a responsible and ethical way, including:
Providing a wide spectrum of responsibly sourced food products, such as sustainably sourced seafood, humanely raised proteins and fair-trade, certified coffee
Adopting animal welfare principles and purchasing commitments that address a broad spectrum of issues impacting the treatment of animals for egg, pork, veal, beef, poultry and dairy products served across our operations.
Offering clients and customers fresh, safe, whole foods that are raised, grown, and harvested in a sustainable manner, whenever possible
Sourcing products locally, supporting local farmers and fisheries while reducing transportation fuel and emissions
Using environmentally preferable products, like reusable or compostable to-go containers

WASTE MINIMIZATION
Waste minimization extends to every stage of Aramark's operations—from what is purchased to what is served. If not managed properly, waste adds up, and can have a long-term impact on the environment. That’s why environmentally responsible waste management practices—reducing, reusing, recycling and composting—are standard procedure at thousands of our locations every day.
Aramark's focus on waste minimization reduces our environmental impact and decreases the overall cost of waste disposal. Whether it’s efficient planning for exactly the right amount of food to purchase or recycling and composting waste, Aramark minimizes the environmental footprint and demonstrates a commitment to sustainability.
Multiplied across all our locations, the potential impact is enormous: Over the course of a year, just one large convention center can recycle more than 170 tons of cardboard, 2,400 pounds of aluminum cans, 3,300 gallons of kitchen oil, 180 tons of mixed paper, plastic and glass, 12 tons of scrap metal, and as many as 8,000 wood shipping pallets.

EFFICIENT OPERATIONS
Efficient operations go well beyond conservation at Aramark. They cover an array of practices that range from efficient building design to water-and energy-saving practices to low-impact green and even “blue” cleaning.
Aramark's water-saving programs include the design and implementation of conservation plans and installation of water-saving hardware and fittings like low-flow bathroom and kitchen fixtures. And in our uniform business, the laundering process we use is even more efficient than home laundering – which uses 3 gallons of water per pound of home laundry versus 1.3 to 1.4 gallons of water per pound of laundry through our commercial service.
As for energy conservation, Aramark works hard to promote efficiency in buildings, while lending our skills and expertise to clients to help them manage energy use in their facilities.
Not only that, but with Aramark's environmentally friendly program Blue Cleaning™, electrically activated or ionized tap water is used to safely clean or sanitize surfaces as well as hard floors and carpets without the use of harmful chemicals.

FLEET MANAGEMENT
Every day, we count on over 8,000 vehicles to deliver excellent and safe service. Our fleet transports the food we serve, the uniforms we launder and the supplies we need in our facilities. Given the size of our fleet and the distances covered on a day-to-day basis, we’re going the extra mile in minimizing emissions and maximizing efficiency.
We work directly with manufacturers to provide input on the design of our service fleet vehicles for increased efficiency and longevity. We also monitor our vehicles’ performance through advanced maintenance diagnostics, allowing our fleet operators to significantly lessen fuel consumption.
Additionally, in partnership with federal, state and local governments, we explore opportunities with high-efficiency, alternate-fueled vehicles and incorporate them into our fleet. And through our route-optimization program, our uniforms fleet reduces miles, fuel and emissions using GPS devices and state-of-the-art routing software to map out the most efficient travel routes.

http://www.aramark.com/about-us/corporate-responsibility/environmental-sustainability


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Dining Services/Food plan(s):

Business Services - Panther Dining - Aramark

https://shop.fiu.edu/dining/restaurants/fresh-food-company/index.html


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Energy:

FIU is committed to reducing energy consumption per the Florida HB 5201 Section 30. For the last six years, FIU has ranked #1 in Energy Efficiency among the Florida State University System.

To continue improving energy efficiency FIU is committed to:
1) Finish chilled water and electrical metering on all buildings
2) Expand chilled water loop as campuses grow and continue automation of the central chiller plants
3) Increase operational efficiency of chiller plants & chilled water loop by utilizing computer-controlled chiller sequence operation
4) Transition to LED Lighting where appropriate & feasible (Streets, Walkways, Garages, etc.)
5) Work side-by-side with the Sustainability office to maximize “green” goals and increase our current Silver rating in the Sustainability Tracking, Assessment, & Rating System (STARS) program by implementing energy initiatives that directly impact sustainability performance
6) Research ... Benchmark ... Listen ... Learn ... Advance

http://facilities.fiu.edu/Documents/Energy_Docs/FY12-13%20FIU-SUS%20Energy%20Performance%20Presentation%2001-27-14.pdf


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Energy plan(s):

In May 2010 Florida HB 5201 Section 30 declared “Each Florida college and state university shall strive to reduce its campus wide energy consumption by 10%... The reduction may be obtained by either reducing the cost of the energy consumed or by reducing total energy usage, or a combination of both.” FY 2007-2008 was decided as the baseline year.

Projects that have been completed include:
1) Chilled water plants provide cooling to most buildings on campus
High efficiency chillers (result in lowered KW/Ton consumption)
Recently completed satellite chiller plant in AHC quadrant with back- up power & high efficiency equipment
2) Meters & Measurements
Electrical and chilled water sub-meters on buildings approximately 70% of buildings provide real-time monitoring to achieve efficiency and reduce waste
Monthly reporting focus on kBTU/sf performance
3) On-line Energy Management System (EMS)
Central EMS balances temperatures in 95% of buildings, and also monitors general lighting areas such as hallways in main buildings
4) Building design focused on efficiency. All new buildings are LEED certified
with a goal of Silver rating.
5) Culture of energy conservation
Chilled water temperature synchronized with environmental conditions
Motion-sensor switches throughout majority of the campus
Replacement of T12 with T8 lighting fixtures
Temperature set point raised from 72 to 75°F during daylight hours, and
75 to 80°F during night hours
Replacement of liquid propane gas with natural gas in Summer
2009 on MMC resulted in savings of more than $355K over each of the last four years. Additionally, switching to a new provider of natural gas in FY 13-14 should result in an additional 15-20% savings in the price currently paid for natural gas each year.
Installation of low-flow water fixtures such as sinks, showers, toilets and urinals (these use about 30% less water than conventional counterparts)
Landscape irrigation with captured rainwater at MMC, and with graywater at BBC
6) Craftsman’s approach & lunch-bucket work ethic

Energy Performance results for the last six years can be found at http://facilities.fiu.edu/Documents/Energy_Docs/FY12-13%20FIU-SUS%20Energy%20Performance%20Presentation%2001-27-14.pdf


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Energy plan(s):

Facilities Management Department

http://facilities.fiu.edu


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Grounds:

The Campus Master Plan addresses Landscape Design Guidelines for the university.

ELEMENT 16.0
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
The purpose of the Landscape Design Guidelines is to provide the campuses of Florida International University with a framework for landscape and hardscape treatments in order to maintain a high level of design quality to new spaces and to the enhancement of existing landscaped areas. It is the intent of the Landscape Design Guideline Element to provide an overall landscape framework, which unifies each campus with its distinct built and natural environment.
A defined hierarchy of spaces has been identified and main circulation routes should be reinforced with identifiable landscape treatments. Significant pedestrian corridors should continue link the academic cores within the campus. As the overall character of the FIU campus continues to mature, various spaces will be defined following these guiding principles:
 Integrate architectural, site design and infrastructure improvements in conjunction with landscape architectural design in the planning process to ensure that attractive settings and ample open spaces are provided in conjunction with new buildings and infrastructure improvements.
 Develop new significant landscape features in association with campus growth, including campus spaces such as quads, plazas, campus streets and campus edges while enhancing the concept of the primary axes and regulating lines.
 Blend new development sites with the character of the mature campus landscape and natural areas. Retain islands of vegetation in new development areas and/or creating new and similar vegetative that seamlessly integrates buildings and site facilities into the surrounding context.
 Maintain a selective palette of indigenous and site-adaptive plant species that express the subtropical environment configured to promote Xeriscape and principles and Florida appropriate design.

http://facilities.fiu.edu/Documents/Planning/MasterPlans/MasterPlans10_20/CMP_Update_Docs_10_20/CMP_Update_Chapters_10_20/Element_16_Landscape_Design_Guidelines.pdf


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Grounds plan(s):

The following are objectives of the Landscape Design Guidelines Element that address sustainability:

Objective 1.5 Develop a hierarchy of landscape treatment for Campus Streets

Objective 1.7 Plant materials shall further inform the five underlying goals of incorporating research and teaching opportunities, improving walkability, enhancing Art, incorporate sustainable strategies and increase the amount and quality of student spaces while eliminating use of invasive exotic species and those which necessitate excessive maintenance.

Objective 1.10 Retention/Stormwater Elements: Adopt standards for landscape edge treatments surrounding ponds, lakes and storm water features.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Grounds plan(s):

Facilities Management Department

http://facilities.fiu.edu


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Purchasing:
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The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Purchasing plan(s):
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Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Purchasing plan(s):
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A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Transportation:
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The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Transportation plan(s):
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Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Transportation plan(s):
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A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Waste:

In 2008, the Florida Legislature enacted House Bill 7135 which created Section 403.7032, Florida Statutes. This established a new statewide recycling goal of 75% to be achieved by the year 2020. FIU has working toward this goal by increasing waste diversion in the form of recycling and exploring other diversion techniques such as composting.

http://www.dep.state.fl.us/waste/recyclinggoal75/

http://gogreen.fiu.edu/topics/recycling/index.html

Waste is also addressed in the Campus Master Plan under Element 13, Conservation.

http://facilities.fiu.edu/Documents/Planning/MasterPlans/MasterPlans10_20/CMP_Update_Docs_10_20/CMP_Update_Chapters_10_20/Element_13_Conservation.pdf


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Waste plan(s):

Recycling goal of 75% to be achieved by the year 2020

ELEMENT 13.0
CONSERVATION

Objective 2.3 Improve Solid Waste Recycling and Resource Conservation: Establish measures that expand solid waste recycling.

Policy 2.3.1
Maintain and expand the general recycling program for paper, aluminum, glass, etc. Increase recycling goals for proportions of materials recycled established. Monitor compliance with the program on a regular basis. Coordinate with the Environmental Studies Program/

Policy 2.3.2
Review State, regional and local standards for waste management annually. Solid waste management on all campuses shall be in compliance with state, regional and local standards.

Policy 2.3.3
Single stream recycling bins shall be made available in all buildings, courtyards, in open space areas, etc. on both campuses. This program should be made compulsory on a university-wide basis.

Policy 2.3.4
Expand recycling collection to include compostable materials.

Policy 2.3.5
Purchase and promote the use of recycled and reusable food and beverage containers by students patronizing campus dining facilities.

http://facilities.fiu.edu/Documents/Planning/MasterPlans/MasterPlans10_20/CMP_Update_Docs_10_20/CMP_Update_Chapters_10_20/Element_13_Conservation.pdf


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Waste plan(s):

Facilities Management Department

http://facilities.fiu.edu

Office of University Sustainability

http://gogreen.fiu.edu/index.html


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Water:

The Campus Master Plan addresses Landscape Design Guidelines and Architectural Design Guidelines for the university.

ELEMENT 16.0
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES

Policy 1.1.10 Improve the integration of existing and new storm water retention areas as landscape enhancement elements.

Policy 1.7.1
To the degree possible, landscape plans shall include the use of plant species that are indigenous to the native plant communities of the South Florida area. The appropriate selection of native plant species shall be based on their desired size, form, texture and color in the landscape and their positive response to localized environmental conditions including available light levels, soil type and plant community context (Figure 16.45-16.48). In addition, selection of native species should be based on tolerance of existing site conditions, compatibility with other indigenous species and sustainability of the landscape to promote water conservation, to reduce maintenance considerations and to ensure a sustainable landscape or for educational purposes. In cases where non-invasive exotic plants are to be used to enhance the landscape, plantings should be limited to those non-invasive species that are able to resist periods of drought and which require little fertilization and use of pesticides. Prohibited plants as identified by Miami-Dade as well as the Exotic Pest Plant Council's "Florida's Most Invasive Species List" shall not be permitted in any future plantings.

Policy 1.8.4 New projects and major renovations should be seen as opportunities to utilize new pervious paving. The use of pervious pavers in appropriate locations, such as courtyards, plazas and service drives to reduce stormwater runoff and improve water quality is encouraged. All materials shall comply with universal accessibility requirements.

http://facilities.fiu.edu/Documents/Planning/MasterPlans/MasterPlans10_20/CMP_Update_Docs_10_20/CMP_Update_Chapters_10_20/Element_16_Landscape_Design_Guidelines.pdf

ELEMENT 15.0
ARCHITECTURE DESIGN
Building Performance and Hardening
The guidelines highly encourage for early analysis of building performance to assist in the design process. This will help understand and inform siting, scale, materials and energy efficiencies.
The guidelines encourage a minimum of 25% reduction of energy consumptions based on ASHRAE standards as well as a maximization of water re-use strategies on site.
It is encouraged to look into potential capturing of water condensation as well as rain water, into cisterns that can supply the building and it’s irrigation during normal operations peaks as well as help on emergency conditions such as hurricanes or water shortages.

http://facilities.fiu.edu/Documents/Planning/MasterPlans/MasterPlans10_20/CMP_Update_Docs_10_20/CMP_Update_Chapters_10_20/Element_15_Architectural_Design_Guidelines.pdf


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Water plan(s):

ELEMENT 15.0
ARCHITECTURE DESIGN
Building Performance and Hardening
The guidelines encourage a minimum of 25% reduction of energy consumptions based on ASHRAE standards as well as a maximization of water re-use strategies on site.

http://facilities.fiu.edu/Documents/Planning/MasterPlans/MasterPlans10_20/CMP_Update_Docs_10_20/CMP_Update_Chapters_10_20/Element_15_Architectural_Design_Guidelines.pdf

ELEMENT 13.0
CONSERVATION
Objective 2.2 Maximize Water Conservation:
Establish measures that reduce water utilization.

Policy 2.2.1
Conserve water and reduce chemical use through the use of xeriscape design principles, which include but are not limited to:
- Use of drought tolerant and native plant materials;
- Use of low volume delivery fixtures;
- Zoned irrigation systems;
- Moisture sensors and rain switches;
- Use of drought tolerant ground cover;
- Use of canopy trees; and
- Use of soil amendments and mulch to enable soils to retain
moisture.

Policy 2.2.2
Retrofit existing campus buildings with water-saving devices. Require that water-efficient (high efficient) fixtures and other water-saving devices be installed in all future buildings and adhere to Miami-Dade County Water Efficiency Standards in Section 8-31 of the Miami-Dade County Code, and Chapter 6, Section 604.4 of the Florida Building Code

Policy 2.2.3
Reduce the use of potable water for landscape irrigation by expanding the use of harvested greywater. All irrigation must comply with the Miami-Dade County's permanent landscape irrigation restrictions in Section 32-8.2 of the Miami-Dade County Code

Policy 2.2.4
Promote Florida Friendly principles through the use of drought- tolerant landscape species, the use of irrigation systems that conserve the use of potable and non-potable water supplies, and restrictions on the amount of lawn areas.

Policy 2.2.5
Decorative fountains consuming large quantities of potable water should be discouraged. Natural water features such as raingardens and retentions ponds should be used to promote conservation and best practices for stormwater management.

http://facilities.fiu.edu/Documents/Planning/MasterPlans/MasterPlans10_20/CMP_Update_Docs_10_20/CMP_Update_Chapters_10_20/Element_13_Conservation.pdf


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Water plan(s):

Facilities Management Department

http://facilities.fiu.edu


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance Diversity and Affordability:

Diversity is inherent at Florida International University. It alludes to the “International” part of our name, and is incorporated in our mission statement and one of it’s core values:

"Institutional Mission Statement: FIU is an urban, multi-campus, public research university serving its students and the diverse population of South Florida. We are committed to high-quality teaching, state-of-the-art research and creative activity, and collaborative engagement with our local and global communities.
Core Value: Respect – for diversity and the dignity of the individual."

Our unique South Florida location makes us a nexus for attracting a diverse student and faculty population from many countries. As a federally designated minority-serving institution, diversity is addressed in many institutional goals from the 'Beyond Possible 2020 Strategic Plan.'

Today, FIU offers 196 bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees. Our enrollment of more than 54,000 students places us fifth among the largest public universities in the United States. But size itself is less important than scale to leverage institutional priorities in a context of a dynamically growing community with a high percentage of foreign-born residents, English-language learners, first-generation students and place-bound learners. FIU serves a diverse community with a student body that represents the future of American public universities. More than half of our undergraduate students qualify for Pell grants and are the first in their families to graduate from college. We see ourselves as a 21st century urban public research university that is a solutions center for our community and reflects the dynamism and diversity of our immigrant community.

One of the goals from the strategic plan is to continue to develop and expand seamless and accelerated success pathway programs that attract and support different types of students. We need to ensure that every high-potential student wishing to graduate from FIU has a pathway that ensures his or her success.
• Increase support for transfer students. FIU will work with the eight state colleges in South Florida to develop a robust FIU “Connect4Success” dual admissions program. We will develop relationships with students while they are in state colleges to build affinity for FIU, admit them as FIU students to receive campus benefits and prepare them for academic success upon transferring to FIU.
• Expand student access programs like Education Effect, ACCESS, Golden Scholars, McNair Achievement, Panther LIFE and Fostering Panther Pride, among others, to give students opportunities to realize their college dreams.
• Expand dual enrollment offerings to reach more high school students wishing to earn their college degrees faster and to help us recruit these students to FIU.
• Expand FIU’s enrollment area beyond the South Florida region, strategically targeting specific in-state, national and international regions.

This goal specifically supports population growth and success of different types of students at FIU.

The 'Beyond Possible 202 Strategic Plan' can be found at: https://president.fiu.edu/download/beyond-possible-2020-strategic-plan2015-2020/

+ Date Revised: May 26, 2016

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Diversity and Affordability plan(s):

The FIU Strategic Plan’s name, 'Beyond Possible 2020', reflects the fact that these are precedent-setting goals. We plan to be the first public, majority-minority research institution to achieve these goals. Success will require a collective will to move beyond the familiar. It will take broad-based and continuous support from our internal and external communities. It will force us to step collectively outside our comfort zone to address new challenges.

The Strategic Plan also identifies specific Performance Indicator Goals that address growing diversity and affordability:
• Reduce average cost of bachelor’s degree from $26k (2014) to $20k (2020).
• Increase bachelor degrees awarded to minorities from 6,219 (2014) to 7,200 by 2020
• Increase the number of first generation college students from 1,982 (2014) to 2,300 by 2020
• Increase the total number of students enrolled from 54,000 (2014) to 65,000 by 2020

All performance indicators can be found on page 5 of the 'Beyond Possible 2020 Strategic Plan.' https://president.fiu.edu/download/beyond-possible-2020-strategic-plan2015-2020/

+ Date Revised: May 26, 2016

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Diversity and Affordability plan(s):

Office of the President

https://president.fiu.edu


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Health, Wellbeing and Work:

The FIU Wellness Committee recently launched the Panthers Active Wellness Services (PAWS) for Your Health website that focuses on mental and physical health of the university community. As a new program, FIU is still formalizing plans.
A message from FIU President Mark B. Rosenberg:
"Florida International University and its administration value your personal health and well-being. The employee wellness program is dedicated to providing awareness, education, and support for healthy lifestyle habits. I encourage you to participate in the employee wellness program in whatever manner will help you to enhance your own health and well-being. The healthier we all are, the better equipped we are to fulfill our responsibilities to our students, our families, and our communities (and to ourselves!)."
This program also addresses Environmental Well-being and the Office of University Sustainability holds a position on the Committee.
http://hr.fiu.edu/index.php?name=panthers_active_wellness_services

+ Date Revised: June 3, 2016

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Health, Wellbeing and Work plan(s):
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Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Health, Wellbeing and Work plan(s):
A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Investment:
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The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Investment plan(s):
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A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in other areas:
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The institution’s definition of sustainability:
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Does the institution’s strategic plan or equivalent guiding document include sustainability at a high level?:
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A brief description of how the institution’s strategic plan or equivalent guiding document addresses sustainability:
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The website URL where information about the institution’s sustainability planning is available:
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The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.