Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 72.90
Liaison Kathleen Crawford
Submission Date July 23, 2020

STARS v2.2

Florida Gulf Coast University
IN-36: Stormwater Modeling

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 0.50 / 0.50 Tom Mayo
Director of Facilities Planning
Facilities Planning
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

A brief description of the methodology/tool used to calculate the percentile local or regional rainfall events for which the institution manages runoff on-site using LID practices and green infrastructure:

Our stormwater system mimics natural processes for water infiltration, evapotranspiration, and reuse to minimize run-off on site. The campus contains an interconnection throughout the property. The rain first enters dry bioswales and once the water level gets to a pre-specified height, the water is slowly released into the wet retention areas. When the water in the wet retention holding areas gets to a pre-specified height at the control structures, the water is slowly released into a wetland for further filtration before exiting campus. Additionally, FGCU has a perimeter berm around our exterior property line to minimize stormwater runoff leaving our campus. Our north and south sloughs are a part of the student housing basin which filters the water before it exits the campus. FGCU has numerous acres of conservation land for the retention of water before exiting campus property until the water is “clean” and the flow has slowed.

Rain gardens and other natural areas on campus serve as habitats to a variety of plants and animals. One new all-native rain garden was planted on the east side of Parking Garage 2 in March 2017 to increase groundwater recharge in that area.

FGCU has large areas of undeveloped land that is used as flood storage and for water quality treatment. The green infrastructure has increased the on-site infiltration, retention, and detention of stormwater and the system has proved to significantly reduce off-site runoff from campus property.

Every building on campus has downspout disconnections. The runoff flow is directed to either a lawn, other kinds of vegetated areas, or onto a pervious surface (such as stones). Roof runoff pollutants are reduced as the water infiltrates and is taken up by the plant roots.

Native tree and vegetative planting and nature trail clean-up events occur each semester to increase our campus biomass, remove litter and debris, and increase stormwater filtration.

Bridges for pedestrian and vehicle traffic allow water and wildlife to flow naturally without additional impermeable concrete or asphalted surfaces. Some LIDs around campus include: bioretention areas (grading, inlets, etc.), green roofs (Parking Garage 4), permeable pavers in walkways, constructed treatment wetlands, rain barrels, and downspout disconnectivity. FGCU uses several types of multi-functional open drainage systems along with more conventional curb-and-gutter systems.

Regular maintenance on the storm drain systems are performed around campus by Physical Plant Grounds Department and is crucial for the functionality. Maintenance operations include:
• Mowing, weed control, and trimming
• Structural repairs
• Sediment removal
• Debris and trash cleanup with focus on the flow control structures
• Replacement, removal, and re-vegetation of the porous detention media
• Pruning trees and other shrubs

Before breaking ground in 1995 to build FGCU's campus, Johnson Engineering completed stormwater modeling analyses to maximize Low Impact Development (LID). Please see the attached file for details of their modeling studies. These studies date back to our campuses inception and continue prior to any new development.

Our green infrastructure and low impact development is consistent with the EPAs stormwater best management practices. Our system mimics the natural processes for infiltration, evapotranspiration, and reuse of stormwater run-off on site. LID on campus helps to maintain the natural hydrologic and ecological functions. Examples of LID on campus include: bioretention areas (grading, inlets, etc.), green roofs (Parking Garage 4), permeable pavers in walkways, constructed treatment wetlands, rain barrels, and downspout disconnectivity. FGCU uses several types of multi-functional open drainage systems along with more conventional curb-and-gutter systems.

Johnson Engineering, as well as students, faculty, and staff, monitor the health and functionality of our campus stormwater systems. Methodologies used for the program follow Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s “Nonpoint Source Management Section” for the Florida Stormwater Erosion and Sedimentation Controls. The Physical Plant’s Grounds Department, Facilities Planning, and Environmental Health and Safety are responsible for inspecting both existing and new construction sites where there may be environmental impacts on the stormwater systems. Tools used to monitor our stormwater systems include piezometers, YSI technology, GPS satellite data, and visual inspections. Regular maintenance on the storm drain systems are performed around campus by Physical Plant Grounds Department and is crucial for the functionality. Maintenance operations include:
• Mowing, weed control, and trimming
• Structural repairs
• Sediment removal
• Debris and trash cleanup with focus on the flow control structures
• Replacement, removal, and re-vegetation of the porous detention media
• Pruning trees and other shrubs


Percentile of local or regional rainfall events for which the institution manages runoff on-site using LID practices and green infrastructure:
95th

Website URL where information about the stormwater modeling is available:
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Additional documentation to support the submission:
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Dr. Seneshaw Tsegaye, Assistant Professor in the Department of Environmental and Civil Engineering, (https://www.fgcu.edu/eng/facultystaff/drseneshawtsegaye#ResearchInterests) has developed a 3D virtual reality tool to simulate flooding and water flow through the Florida Gulf Coast University campus. Through virtual reality, instructors and students work side-by-side to simulate hurricane flooding on FGCU’s landscape. Currently, the model uses data from previous weather events like Hurricane Irma.
https://www.winknews.com/2019/08/31/fgcu-developing-technology-that-can-predict-weather-damage-before-it-happens/

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution or simply email your inquiry to stars@aashe.org.