Overall Rating Expired
Overall Score Expired
Liaison Kathleen Crawford
Submission Date July 28, 2014
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

Florida Gulf Coast University
PA-2: Sustainability Planning

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete Expired Katie Leone
Sustainability Coordinator
Environmental Health & Safety
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have current and formal plans to advance sustainability in the following areas? Do the plans include measurable objectives?:
Current and Formal Plans (Yes or No) Measurable Objectives (Yes or No)
Curriculum Yes Yes
Research (or other scholarship) Yes Yes
Campus Engagement Yes Yes
Public Engagement Yes Yes
Air and Climate Yes Yes
Buildings Yes Yes
Dining Services/Food Yes Yes
Energy Yes Yes
Grounds Yes Yes
Purchasing No No
Transportation Yes Yes
Waste Yes Yes
Water Yes Yes
Diversity and Affordability Yes Yes
Health, Wellbeing and Work Yes
+ Date Revised: Sept. 8, 2014
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Investment --- ---
Other --- ---

A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Curriculum:

University Colloquium is a required course for all undergraduate students at FGCU. The University Colloquium is an interdisciplinary environmental education course designed to explore the concept of sustainability as it relates to a variety of considerations and forces in Southwest Florida. In particular, the course considers environmental, social, ethical, historical, scientific, economic, and political influences. http://www.fgcu.edu/Colloquium/

+ Date Revised: Sept. 8, 2014

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Curriculum plan(s):

Passing the University Colloquium is an undergraduate degree requirement for all baccalaureates.
The course goals are:
• to provide a sense of place and an understanding of the unique ecological features of the Southwest Florida environment;
• to assist in achieving the Florida Gulf Coast University learning goal of developing "an ecological perspective" and in teaching the related outcomes that the student will
• "..know the issues related to economic, social, and ecological sustainability, analyze and evaluate ecological issues locally and globally, participate in collaborative projects requiring awareness and/or analysis of ecological and environmental issues;"
• to provide experiences to assist in moving toward achieving the eight other FGCU learning goals and their related outcomes (a list of the nine FGCU Student Learning Goals and Outcomes is attached);
• to enable a working understanding of sustainability, of environmental education, and of ecological literacy.

Concept Adopted At The January 15, 1997 Dean's Council Meeting

We have made a commitment as a university to make environmental education an integral part of our identity. One of our university-wide outcomes is that all students will develop "an ecological perspective". A way to accomplish this perspective is to devise a course, or group of experiences, with an environmental focus that all FGCU students must complete, and in which faculty from all four colleges would be involved. Because "ecology" applies to our total living space and interrelationships, human and natural, it is relevant to all our disciplines and professions. Thus, an ecology course would touch on all nine of the university-wide goals and outcomes, and more. Students would not only be introduced to FGCU values, they would participate in them.

(http://www.fgcu.edu/Colloquium/)

+ Date Revised: Sept. 8, 2014

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Curriculum plan(s):

University Colloquium Advisory Council (UCAC), Office of Undergraduate Studies


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Research (or other scholarship):

As stated in the 2010-2015 Strategic Plan, “As a public comprehensive regional university, FGCU will emphasize the discovery and application of knowledge in its degree programs, through its research and sponsored programs, and through its efforts designed to diversify and develop the region’s economy in cooperation with local industry whenever possible.”

+ Date Revised: Sept. 8, 2014

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Research plan(s):

Goal 1: Academic Excellence of the Campus 2-10-2015 Strategic Plan benchmarks to increase Foundation scholarship support to students by 5% annually and to also increase the amount of supported student travel, undergraduate research assistantships by 5%. The strategic plan specifically states that environmental sustainability is a priority for research at FGCU in Goals 5 & 7 and benchmarks to pursue private public partnerships that “promote alignment of FGCU academic programs and research with the external community” and increases the amount of research proposals submitted, funded and published. (http://www.fgcu.edu/Provost/files/FGCU_Strategic_Plan_2010-2015.pdf)

Also see policy 2.001 regarding Centers and Instituters at FGCU: :http://www.fgcu.edu/generalcounsel/files/policies/2_001_Centers_and_Institute_1_20_09.pdf

+ Date Revised: Sept. 8, 2014

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Research plan(s):

The Office of Research and Graduate Studies, The University Foundation, and any Centers and Institutes responsible for funding or conducting and/or supporting research initiatives at FGCU.

+ Date Revised: Sept. 8, 2014

A brief description of the plan(s) to advance Campus Engagement around sustainability:

FGCU has adopted a formal civic engagement requirement for all undergraduate students in the Campus Master Plan. Those entering FGCU as a Freshman must complete 80 hours of service learning as a graduation requirement (transfer students 40 hours). FGCU curates a list of community partners where students may earn these hours. Many of these community partners are also vital to the University Colloquium course, prioritizing social and environmental sustainability.
The University values the development of the responsible self, grounded in honesty, courage, and compassion, and committed to advancing democratic ideals. Through service learning requirements, the University engages students in community involvement with time for formal refection of their experiences. Integral to the University’s philosophy is instilling in students and environmental consciousness that balances their economic and social aspiration with the imperative for ecological sustainability.

+ Date Revised: Sept. 8, 2014

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Campus Engagement plan:

Student involvement in service learning is reported to the Office of Service-Learning. Certain service based courses are also routinely audited including University Colloquium and Foundations of Civic Engagement.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Campus Engagement plan(s):

Office of Service-Learning


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance Public Engagement around sustainability:

The University will increasingly become a force for positive change in Southwest Florida through the leadership and actions of its faculty, staff, and students, in terms of the following: workforce development; cultural/recreational events; scholarship; lifelong learning and the Renaissance Academy; and public service that are intended to promote economic diversity and the welfare of its people. In turn, the community will increase its engagement with the University and contribute to its success.
From FGCU’s Strategic Plan 2010-2015: “Service to Southwest Florida, including access to the University, is a public trust. The University is committed to forging partnerships and being responsive to its region. It strives to make available its knowledge resources, services, and educational offerings at times, places, in forms and by methods that will meet the needs of all its constituents. Access means not only admittance to buildings and programs, but also entrance in the spirit of intellectual and cultural community that the University creates and nourishes”

+ Date Revised: Sept. 8, 2014

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Public Engagement plan(s):

Through WGCU Public Media on FGCU, the university will measure success of public engagement by
-Retain high ratings; produce 4 “Your Voice” initiatives;
produce 200 one-hour “Gulf Coast Live” programs; use its
resources to continue 48 minutes of weekday local radio
newscasts.
-Produce 12 “Perspectives” broadcasts; publish faculty
articles; work with the Foundation; explore FGCU Athletics –
focused programming.
-Monthly analysis of Web use and similar statistics.

Through curriculum objectives will be measured by
- Assessment of the Foundations of Civic Engagement course; additional collaboration between the Office of Service Learning and the faculty and the Office of Student Involvement, in the Division of Student Affairs with the faculty; development of
Professional Development Schools with two schools in Naples; service hours contributed by the Athletics Department student athletes and staff; and at least 10,000 hours of service learning focusing on environmental sustainability contributed by Colloquium


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Public Engagement plan(s):

Office of Service-Learning, WGCU Public Media


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Air and Climate:

Our most recent American Colleges and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment progress report can be found at http://rs.acupcc.org/progress/970/

Also see UNDERSTANDING THE PRESIDENT’S CLIMATE COMMITMENT:
TOWARD A CARBON NEUTRAL FLORIDA GULF COAST UNIVERSITY at http://www.fgcu.edu/CESE/files/Carbon_Neutral_FGCU.pdf

+ Date Revised: Sept. 8, 2014

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Air and Climate plan(s):

Study recommendations of the Environmental Sustainability Committee (ESC) and identify those to be implemented;


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Air and Climate plan(s):

Environmental Sustainability Committee, Environmental Health and Safety Department, Center for Environmental and Sustainability Education, The Planning and Budgeting Committee

+ Date Revised: Sept. 8, 2014
+ Date Revised: Sept. 8, 2014

A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Buildings:

Since the 2005 master plan, making the buildings multiple stories has helped to vary the architectural language
of the buildings. It has made design features a little more flexible as well as allowing for flat roofs to be included. A continued focus on sustainability in future buildings will also result in design choices regarding form, orientation and façade treatment that lead to visual interest. Combining all these features together, the campus will express the architectural variety without sacrificing cohesiveness.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Buildings plan(s):

All new buildings will be built to at least LEED standards; automate buildings and retrofit to reduce energy consumption; realize a 5% reduction per square foot in savings during 2010-11 from these actions. (See Goal 5 in 2010-2015 Strategic Plan- http://www.fgcu.edu/Provost/files/FGCU_Strategic_Plan_2010-2015.pdf )

+ Date Revised: Sept. 8, 2014

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Buildings plan(s):

University Provost, FGCU Physical Plant


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Dining Services/Food:

The Student Government formally adopted a Resolution to participate in the Real Food Challenge on June 24, 2014 (http://fgcusg.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/1314-010-Real-Food-Challenge.pdf). The Food Foresters Service Learning Leaders will work with our food service provider to ensure that the amount of “Real Food” on campus to at least 20% by 2020.

+ Date Revised: Sept. 8, 2014

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Dining Services/Food plan(s):

To ensure the amount of real food on campus to at least 20% by 2020.

+ Date Revised: Sept. 8, 2014

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Dining Services/Food plan(s):

Food Forest Service Learning leaders and Aramark.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Energy:

FGCU has a commitment through the University Strategic Plan to implement and promote strategies to reduce building energy consumption.
Florida Gulf Coast University has completed construction of a 15-acre solar photovoltaic array that produces approximately 85 percent of the energy needed to operate its Engineering and Business School buildings, as well as AB-7, the newest science laboratory and classroom building for the College of Arts and Sciences. The University Main Campus’s total reliance on Florida Power & Light Co. is reduced by 18 percent (this excludes Housing).
The HVAC system for the FGCU campus is based upon central HVAC plant with high-efficiency, water-cooled centrifugal chillers incorporating cooling towers, partial thermal storage, and campus distribution piping networks of 42°F chilled water for central HVAC cooling system. The Central Energy Plant model was designed to provide chilled
water to all the campus buildings within the Loop Road. These four chillers, two 1200-ton
centrifugal chillers, a 600-ton rotary screw chiller and a 300-ton rotary screw chiller, can be arranged in a variety of peak and off-peak operating modes to optimize chiller part load performance and shift electrical demand to off-peak hours.

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Energy plan(s):
All new buildings will be built to at least LEED standards; automate buildings and retrofit to reduce energy consumption; realize a 5% reduction per square foot. (See Goal 5 in 2010-2015 Strategic Plan- http://www.fgcu.edu/Provost/files/FGCU_Strategic_Plan_2010-2015.pdf )

+ Date Revised: Sept. 8, 2014

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Energy plan(s):

All new buildings will be built to at least LEED standards; automate buildings and retrofit to reduce energy consumption; realize a 5% reduction per square foot in savings during 2010-11 from these actions.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Energy plan(s):

University Provost, FGCU Physical Plant


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Grounds:

In addition to maintenance of the buildings and landscaped grounds, the Physical Plant Department currently has responsibility for managing and monitoring extensive University areas (approximately 420 acres) devoted to restored, created, and preserved wetlands and upland areas, to ensure compliance with the U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers, Department of Environmental Protection, and South Florida Water Management District permit requirements. The University has an active program of Melaleuca eradication using Department of Corrections’ inmates and physical and chemical methods. Master Plan policies dictate the use of “natural” or informal landscape designs and indigenous plant materials in order to minimize maintenance and achieve the University’s aesthetic vision and goals. The Athletic Department maintains the athletic and recreation fields on campus. All work on the wetlands and grounds is done through contractual services with consultants and qualified private firms.

As part of the mitigation process on campus, the Ground Department is responsible for the removal of non-native plant species. The Grounds Department is currently focusing on the eradication of invasive non-native species, as these types of plant can cause the most damage to natural areas. The invasive non-native species most commonly removed from FGCU’s campus include Brazilian Pepper, Melaleuca, Old World Climbing Fern, Caesar Weed, Cogongrass, Torpedo Grass, Downy Rose Myrtle, and Earleaf Acacia.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Grounds plan(s):

• Please see Section 13 of the Campus Master Plan. (http://www.fgcu.edu/Facilities/Files/20120417GOP.pdf)
• Also read more details about hot FGCU is increase the health of the campus ecosystem by removing exotics and planting 10,000-12,000 natives each year as specified in the Master Plan and by reading the Pinnacle article on Invasive Plants here: http://www.fgcupinnacle.com/pinnacle-articles/features/invasive-plants

+ Date Revised: Sept. 8, 2014

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Grounds plan(s):

FGCU Physical Plant


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Purchasing:
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The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Purchasing plan(s):
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Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Purchasing plan(s):
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A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Transportation:

From the Campus Master Plan:
11.0 TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT

11.1 Introduction
The traffic circulation and parking plan for the University is designed to provide maximum flexibility for future development of all portions of the campus, while minimizing the impacts of construction of these facilities on the natural environment. The proposed traffic circulation plan includes three access points to the University campus off Ben Hill Griffin Parkway, which connect to the main interior circulation road which circles the academic core. The circular configuration provides maximum flexibility for distribution of traffic between the northern and main entrances.

Coordination between the University, Lee County, and adjacent developments will be important to ensure that safe, convenient access to the University is provided. The policies defined in the Intergovernmental Element of this Master Plan define how this coordination will be achieved.

11.2 Goals, Objectives and Policies
TRANSIT, CIRCULATION AND PARKING SUB-ELEMENT
GOAL 1101
Provide sufficient parking on campus to accommodate the needs of the University (See Figure 11-1 Future Vehicular Circulation and Parking Campus Access).

Objective 1101.1 – Provision of On-Campus Parking Spaces
Provide parking spaces on campus that are conveniently located to destinations and meet the anticipated needs of faculty, staff, students, and visitors.

Policy 1101.1.1
Provide parking spaces on campus in proportion to the number of faculty and staff and based upon the student
headcount enrollment at the University, at a ratio of 0.3358 parking spaces per student headcount.

Policy 1101.1.2
Locate the primary parking spaces serving the University academic functions within the campus roadway encircling the academic core.

Policy 1101.1.3
Locate parking spaces outside the academic core to support student housing, recreational facilities, support facilities, and other facilities planned within the University property. A new parking garage should be located near the Athletics Complex to support the multiple programs hosted there.

Policy 1101.1.4
Distribute the parking spaces on campus in order to minimize walking time for students, faculty and staff.

Policy 1101.1.5
Designate visitor parking at locations that can be clearly signed and are easily accessible for visitors.

Policy 1101.1.6
Monitor the operation and utilization of parking facilities on an annual basis after the start of classes to identify the need for more spaces or changes to parking operations. Based on this analysis, modify operations and plans for future parking.

Policy 1101.1.7
Develop parking facilities in the academic core as new projects are implemented or as parking demand increases, as shown in the Phasing Sequence included in the Capital Improvements Element.

Policy 1101.1.8
Ensure that parking spaces for the disabled are provided within close proximity to buildings. Provide such spaces immediately adjacent to high-use facilities such as the library and athletics and recreation facilities.

Policy 1101.1.9
Make use of service access roads and/or loading areas to provide more disabled parking closer to buildings and facilities than can be provided in general parking areas.

GOAL 1102
Develop a roadway system within the campus that will serve the internal and external access and internal circulation needs of the University.

Objective 1102.1 – Provision of Future Traffic Circulation Improvements - External Access

Develop an access system for the campus with sufficient capacity to accommodate the peak traffic movements at acceptable levels of service and to achieve a reasonable distribution of campus traffic on the external roadways.

Policy 1102.1.1
Provide three access connections to Ben Hill Griffin Parkway, linking the internal circulation roads with the external roadway system. Maintain Level of Service “D” conditions for the peak inbound and peak outbound movements at the access points.

Policy 1102.1.2
Provide four lanes on the main access roadway, four lanes on the secondary access roadway, and two lanes on the third access roadway.

Policy 1102.1.3
If and when development occurs east of the University campus, work with Lee County and adjacent land owners to develop an access route into the campus from the east. The access easement is indicated in Figure 11-
1a.

Objective 1102.2 – Provision of Future Traffic Circulation Improvements - Internal Access Develop and maintain an internal system of roadways to circulate traffic between sub areas within the campus and to discourage use by non-campus traffic.

Policy 1102.2.1
Provide a circular roadway around the academic core area to distribute traffic between access roadways, parking facilities, and service areas.

Policy 1102.2.2
Provide circulation roads that serve each sub area, which link to the external access roadways or the main circular roadway, and which provide convenient access for service and emergency vehicle use.

Policy 1102.2.3
Provide two through-lanes on the internal circulation roadways with provisions for separate turn lanes at key intersections and access driveways.

Policy 1102.2.4
Maintain Level of Service "D" continuous (daily) on all roadways within the campus. Maintain Level of
Service "D" conditions (peak hour) on all roadways and signalized intersections within the campus.

Policy 1102.2.5
At the time of the next Campus Master Plan update – or earlier if warranted, undertake a special on-site traffic study of primary on-campus roadways, primary on-campus intersections and campus access points. Study should obtain daily and peak-hour traffic volumes and evaluate existing and future Level of Service conditions.
Objective 1102.3 – Priorities and Phasing of Transit, Circulation and Parking Facilities Develop on-campus transit, circulation and parking facilities in a sequence that meets the development needs of the University, and maintains Level of Service standards.

Policy 1102.3.1
Develop on-site transit, circulation, and parking facilities in the sequence defined in the Capital Improvements
Element. Modifications of the phasing sequence shall be identified in the
University's annual C.I.P. submission to the State University System Board of Governors and incorporated in
Master Plan amendments as required by Sec. 1013.30, F.S.

Objective 1102.3 – Provision of Traffic Circulation

Improvements - Context Area
Ensure that transportation system improvements are coordinated with the future land uses shown on the future land use map or map series, and with those improvements identified in Lee County’s comprehensive plan.

Policy 1102.3.1
Assist Lee County, the Florida Department of Transportation, and the SWRPC in a University Community Transportation and Traffic Circulation Coordinating Committee to coordinate planning activities and to ensure that external roadway improvements identified in Lee County’s Long Range Transportation Plan are scheduled to keep pace with development activity at the University and in the community.

Objective 1102.4
Organize service vehicle access in and around the campus to minimize intrusion of service vehicles on campus activities.

Policy 1102.4.1
Establish times and locations for regular service providers to enter and park on campus so as to be least disruptive to campus activities and campus visual character.

Policy 1102.4.2
Golf cart vehicles shall be prohibited from driving and parking within the central campus pedestrian spaces – the central pedestrian corridor, campus “Library Green,” and their extensions to the north, south, east and west.

Objective 1102.4.3 – Physical Accommodation of Service Vehicles Develop physical designs for new facilities that accommodate appropriate and necessary space for service vehicle access and parking.

Policy 1102.4.4
Design new service locations in accordance with policies contained in Chapter 3.0 Urban Design Element.

GOAL 1103
Reduce the need for future roadway capacity and parking at the University through the provisions designed to reduce dependence on the single-occupant vehicle and promote of public transit service of regional counties to serve the needs of the University and surrounding areas.

Objective 1103.1 – Provision of Transit Service
Provide public transit service to the campus from major activity centers and system transfer points.

Policy 1103.1.1
Coordinate with Lee County Transit and other regional transportation organizations to continue and enhance present transit service to the campus.

Policy 1103.1.2
Provide designated bus stops for public transit buses at four main locations around the campus loop road:
a) Western edge of the Academic Core
b) Eastern edge of the Academic Core
c) Southern edge of the Academic Core
d) Northern edge of the Academic Core
Bus stops should provide for shelter from the elements, and act as points of convenient transfer from the county bus system to the campus shuttle system.

Policy 1103.1.3
Design the campus roadways to accommodate bus turning movements, bus stops and bus layover areas at locations identified in Policy 11034.1.2.

Policy 1103.1.4
Assist in the daily scheduling of bus service to the University by providing Lee County Transit and other transportation organizations with student enrollment by class with hourly starting and finishing times, along with location of residence, on an annual basis.

Policy 1103.1.5
Work with Lee County Transit and other transportation organizations to establish favorable rate structures, semester-oriented transit passes and other fee options specifically oriented toward increasing transit use by
University students, faculty, and staff.

Policy 1103.1.6
Continue the parking fee program for on-campus parking that encourages the use of public transit service and other non-automobile transportation.

Policy 1103.1.7
As the southeast housing and student life district is developed, extend the campus shuttle service currently serving the North Lake Village Housing area to the new residential zone. This will interconnect the academic core, north lake district and southeast district with convenient intra-campus transit service. Such service should have the effect of reducing vehicular traffic on the campus loop road between the three major districts, reducing vehicle emissions and the use of fossil fuels, and reducing the need for additional parking facilities on the academic core.

Policy 1103.1.8
At the time of the next campus master plan update, the University should consider the feasibility of extending campus shuttle service to the northwest and/or southwest districts of campus, to reduce vehicular traffic on the campus loop road and increase the convenience of travel between the various campus districts.
Objective 1103.2 – Reduce Dependence on the Single-Occupant Vehicle
Promote the application of Transportation Demand Management (TDM) strategies within the campus and host community designed to reduce the dependence on the single-occupant vehicle as the primary mode of transportation and to encourage alternative modes of travel.

Policy 1103.2.1
The University shall implement (where feasible) transportation demand management (TDM) strategies designed to encourage the use of alternative modes of transportation and to reduce the dependence on the single-occupant vehicle as the primary mode of transportation. These strategies may include:
a) Operational modifications, such as preferential parking for carpools, working with transit providers to develop additional transit routes to student housing areas, and extended evening service;
b) Improvement of pedestrian and non-vehicular facilities;
c) Increasing the number of students living on campus;
d) Academic scheduling modifications, including scheduling more classes during non-peak hours;
e) Parking pricing strategies designed to make other modes of travel more economical;
f) Free bus pass for FGCU employees;
g) Traffic system management approaches; and
h) Locating student-oriented housing in close proximity to the campus.

Policy 1103.2.2
The University shall evaluate the potential uses of distance learning techniques (i.e., stay at home working; telecommuting) to reduce the need to travel to the

University.Policy 1103.2.3
The University shall work closely with the Lee County Planning Department and the Lee County DOT to evaluate strategies for multiple occupancy vehicles.

Policy 1103.2.4
The University shall pursue funding from the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) and other agencies for the establishment and operation of an off-campus park and ride program. Upon receipt of such funds, the adopted Campus Master Plan shall be modified as needed to reflect the operation of this program. The University will consider coordination with Lee County Transit and other transportation organizations.

PEDESTRIAN AND NON-VEHICULAR CIRCULATION SUB-ELEMENT
GOAL 1105
Develop the campus of Florida Gulf Coast University with a comprehensive system of pedestrian and non-vehicular circulation facilities to meet the future needs of the University (See Figure 3-2 Urban Design Framework: Pedestrian Paths).
Objective 1105.1 – Coordination of On and Off-Campus Circulation Facilities
Coordinate the location and design of on- and off-campus pedestrian and non-vehicular circulation facilities with those planned and proposed to be developed in areas around the University.

Policy 1105.1.1
Coordinate with adjacent property owners in the development of concepts and plans for a pedestrian circulation system(s) in the southeast housing/student life district and northwest mixed-use district.

Objective 1105.2 – Provision of On-Campus Pedestrian and Non-Vehicular Circulation Facilities Develop the academic core as a pedestrian oriented environment that encourages walking and discourages automobile trips.

Policy 1105.2.1
Develop the main pedestrian paths of the academic core as shown in Figure 3-2, and as described conceptually in policies described in the Urban Design Element. These facilities include:
A. Main pedestrian-ways running generally north-south and east-west.
B. Loop paths linking parking areas to the academic buildings and generally following along the lakes and wetlands within the academic core.
C. Pedestrian/Bicycle facilities along the loop road encircling the academic core.
D. Pedestrian/Bicycle facilities along the main entry road.
E. Pedestrian/Bicycle facilities linking the academic core and the lakefront and Southeastern parcels.
F. Pedestrian/bicycle facilities linking the academic core and the northwestern mixed-use parcel.

Policy 1105.2.2
Develop campus access roadways with 5-foot wide on-road bicycle lanes to accommodate bicycling to and from the campus.

Objective 1105.3 – Priority and Phasing of Pedestrian and Non- Vehicular Improvements
Develop pedestrian and non-vehicular circulation facilities in increments along with the construction of academic and support facilities to ensure a "completed" pedestrian circulation system at each stage of University construction.

Policy 1105.3.1
Continue to promote the pedestrian environment of the central "great space" during future construction and development of the campus core. Provide pedestrian amenities, such as shade and protection from the elements, within this space to encourage activity.

Policy 1105.3.2
To the maximum extent possible, build permanent pedestrian facility improvements rather than temporary facilities within the academic core, in accordance with the Campus Master Plan.

Policy 1105.3.3
Develop pedestrian and non-vehicular circulation system facilities in the sequence shown in the Capital Improvements Element.

Policy 1105.3.4
Permanent lighting of pedestrian and non-vehicular circulation facilities shall be constructed at the time those facilities are constructed to ensure adequate safety for pedestrians on-campus.

Objective 1105.4 – Programs to increase utilization
Provide programs, information, and physical facilities that will encourage increased utilization of pedestrian and non-vehicular movement systems.

Policy 1105.4.1
Provide maps of bicycle routes within Lee County as part information packages provided to new students.

Policy 1105.4.2
Indicate pedestrian and non-vehicular movement systems as part of the campus-wide system of information graphics.

Policy 1105.4.3
Provide attractive service areas and facilities on-campus for storage of bicycles to encourage their use.

Policy 1105.4.4
Encourage bicycle use through periodic "bike-to-school" days or other special events promoting awareness of other modes of travel to the University.

Policy 1105.4.5
Provide, as part of bicycle route information disseminated on-campus, safety guidelines as defined by Lee County/ FDOT/Federal DOT etc, in bicycle-related publications. Objective 1105.5 – Safety of Pedestrian and Non-Vehicular Circulation Facilities Provide a safe, multi-modal transportation system that maximizes the protection of faculty, staff, students, and visitors moving throughout the University and surrounding areas.

Policy 1105.5.1
Maintain records of accidents occurring on pedestrian and non-vehicular circulation facilities.

Policy 1105.52
The University shall conduct an annual review of the pedestrian and non-vehicular circulation facilities on campus to assess the safety of existing facilities and identify improvements needed to upgrade safety.

Policy 1105.5.3
Improvements identified in Policy 1105.5.2 shall be incorporated in the University's annual C.I.P. statement submitted to the State University System Board of Governors, and incorporated in Master Plan amendments as required by Sec. 1013.30, F.S.

Policy 1105.5.4
Identify primary intersections where a high incidence of vehicle/pedestrian/bicycle conflict exists.
Policy 1105.5.5
Manage the speeds of vehicular traffic travelling along the ring road and the internal street network to allow for more driver reaction time, resulting in a safer pedestrian experience.

Policy 1105.5.6
The campus-wide speed limit is 25 mph. Thoroughfare design will match this speed limit using a 25 mph design speed.

Policy 1105.5.7
Intersection curb return radii will be no more than 20’. Travel lane width is limited to 10’.

Policy 1105.5.8
Increase the effectiveness, comfort, and safety of multi-use paths found within the University.

Policy 1105.5.9
Widen the paths to 10’-12’ to allow for ease of movement between the various modes of transportation (bicycle/pedestrian/skateboard/etc.)

Policy 1105.5.10
Golf carts vehicles shall be prohibited from driving and parking within the central campus pedestrian spaces – the central pedestrian corridor, campus “Library Green,” and their extensions to the north, south, east and west.

Policy 1105.5.11
Where paths cross roads, a speed table will be used to slow vehicle traffic to no more than 20 mph, thereby enabling drivers to see and yield to pedestrian traffic.

Policy 1105.5.12
Where paths cross roads and at signalized intersections, high visibility Continental-style crosswalks will be used to ensure drivers are alerted to pedestrian traffic. Locations for these crossings are shown in Figure 11-1c.

Objective 1105.6 – Provision of Lighting along Pedestrian and Non-Vehicular Circulation Routes Develop a lighting program for pedestrian and non-vehicular routes according to appropriate safety standards.

Policy 1105.6.1
Determine appropriate safety standards for each route based on its location with respect to high-activity areas, level of travel, and type of travel.

Policy 1105.6.2
Maintain a minimum average horizontal illumination ranging between 0.5 and 1.0 footcandles, depending on the appropriate safety standards (the higher the footcandle, the brighter the light).

Policy 1105.6.3
Maintain an average vertical illumination ranging between 0.5 and 2.2 footcandles for routes with special pedestrian needs.
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On Sept 3, 2013 The FGCU Student Senate resolved to support the continual funding of Lee county’s route 60, the only public transportation route that stops at FGCU (http://fgcusg.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/1314-001-Support-in-Funding-of-Route-60.pdf).

+ Date Revised: Sept. 8, 2014

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Transportation plan(s):

Ongoing assessments of parking facilities on campus and existing campus infrastructure to best plan new strategies for more sustainable transportation.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Transportation plan(s):

FGCU Provost, Environmental Health and Safety Department.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Waste:

Physical Plant is also the lead University unit in developing and implementing programs for the collection of recyclable materials and for reduction of solid waste, in compliance with the Campus Master Plan’s policies that address FGCU’s commitment to environmentally sound practices. Physical plant provides marked collection containers, some of which are solar compactors in strategically placed locations throughout the campus for the deposit of recyclables and waste.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Waste plan(s):

The Physical Plant monitors and sets measurable waste reduction goals through Recyclemania as described in EN-5 of this report.

+ Date Revised: Sept. 8, 2014

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Waste plan(s):

FGCU Physical Plant


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Water:

In addition to maintenance of the buildings and landscaped grounds, the Physical Plant Department currently has responsibility for managing and monitoring extensive University areas (approximately 420 acres) devoted to restored, created, and preserved wetlands and upland areas, to ensure compliance with the U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers, Department of Environmental Protection, and South Florida Water Management District permit requirements. The University has an active program of Melaleuca eradication using Department of Corrections’ inmates and physical and chemical methods. Master Plan policies dictate the use of “natural” or informal landscape designs and indigenous plant materials in order to minimize maintenance and achieve the University’s aesthetic vision and goals. The Athletic Department maintains the athletic and recreation fields on campus. All work on the wetlands and grounds is done through contractual services with consultants and qualified private firms.

Currently, the building sites in Basins 2 and 3 have been predominantly developed with stormwater management infrastructure in place. These two basins (Basin 2= The Academic Core and Basin 3 and the Student Housing/Recreation Area) have obtained permits that account for much of the developable land. No additional mitigation will be required for development of the remainder of these basins, provided this development is
consistent with the direction provided in the initial conceptual permit. Future development in these areas that varies from the term of the initial conceptual permit will require SFWMD stormwater attenuation and mitigation as specified when those permits are issued.

Basin 4 consists of the development of approximately 48 acres. Stormwater Management criteria are included with this permit application including the utilization of dry detention, wet detention, and incorporation of existing wetlands as attenuation features.

The potable water and fire systems in the central core have been installed and are designed to be extended to future development in the central core area as that development takes place. A proposed South Entrance road to the South Village Housing Area will also include a future water main connection that provides redundancy to the area.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Water plan(s):

Active monitoring of invasive species and wetlands are done by staff and faculty at FGCU.

Water conservation and use also monitored in partnership with the South Florida Water Management District.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Water plan(s):

FGCU Physical Plant


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance Diversity and Affordability:

From the FGCU 2010-2015 Strategic Plan: “Diversity is a source of renewal and vitality. The University is committed to developing capacities for living together in a democracy whose hallmark is individual, social, cultural, and intellectual diversity. It fosters a climate and models a condition of openness in which students, faculty, and staff engage multiplicity and difference with tolerance and equity.”
Examine participation in university exchange agreements: increase number of FGCU participants and balance with number of J visa students from abroad, and integrate
international students with FGCU students.
Increase the number of students from abroad studying at FGCU.
Enhance recruitment efforts to meet University goals for increasing FTICs, transfer
students, students of color, international students and other underrepresented groups.

Expansion of directed efforts to recruit more diverse student body.
Further improve graduate student diversity and retention of non-traditional graduate
students.
Improve coordination of faculty-led study abroad.
http://www.fgcu.edu/Provost/files/FGCU_Strategic_Plan_2010-2015.pdf
Additionally, Policy 1.008, The Disability Access and Reasonable Accommodation Policy and Procedure describes how access is ensured access to all applications, faculty, staff, students, and visitors. (http://www.fgcu.edu/generalcounsel/files/policies/Policy1_008_Disability_Access102213.pdf)

+ Date Revised: Sept. 8, 2014

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Diversity and Affordability plan(s):

Monitor students attending on a visa. Production of Faculty Handbook for Study Abroad. Feedback from students and faculty participants. Implement Eagle Ambassador program with Student Government support.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Diversity and Affordability plan(s):

Office of Equity and Diversity


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Health, Wellbeing and Work:

Policy 4.009m Counseling and Health Services Health Bridge Program states “The Office of Counseling and Health Services provides psychological and physical health services to all enrolled students. This policy states conditions under which students receive such services and exceptions for students who are temporarily not enrolled for a term.”

+ Date Revised: Sept. 8, 2014

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Health, Wellbeing and Work plan(s):

Enrolled students, non-enrolled students and employees are eligible for psychological and physical health services. (http://www.fgcu.edu/generalcounsel/files/policies/47225_6_Health_Bridge_071411.pdf)

+ Date Revised: Sept. 8, 2014

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Health, Wellbeing and Work plan(s):

Vice President for Student Affairs, Student Health Services

+ Date Revised: Sept. 8, 2014

A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Investment:
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The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Investment plan(s):
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Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Investment plan(s):
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A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in other areas:
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The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the other plan(s):
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Accountable parties, offices or departments for the other plan(s):
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The institution’s definition of sustainability:
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Does the institution’s strategic plan or equivalent guiding document include sustainability at a high level?:
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A brief description of how the institution’s strategic plan or equivalent guiding document addresses sustainability:
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The website URL where information about the institution’s sustainability planning is available:

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.