Overall Rating Expired
Overall Score Expired
Liaison Ciannat Howett
Submission Date July 25, 2014
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

Emory University
PA-3: Governance

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete Expired Emily Cumbie-Drake
Sustainability Programs Coordinator
Office of Sustainability Initiatives
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Do all enrolled students, regardless of type or status, have an avenue to participate in one or more governance bodies (through direct participation or the election of representatives)?:
Yes

A brief description of the mechanisms through which students have an avenue to participate in one or more governance bodies:

The Student Government Association (SGA) is the governance organization for the entire University. SGA recognizes 12 subsidiary divisions of Emory University: Allied Health, BBA Council (Undergraduate Business), C3 – Candler Coordinating Council, Club Sports Council, College Council, ESNA (Undergraduate Nursing), Graduate Business, Graduate Nursing Council, Graduate SGA, Grad Student Council (Graduate School of Arts and Sciences), Media Council, Medical School Senate, Outdoor Emory, Oxford SGA, Rollins SGA, SBA (Law School), Student Government Association, and the Student Programming Council (SPC). SGA representatives are elected each spring and serve throughout the following academic year.


Is there at least one student representative on the institution’s governing body who was elected by peers or appointed by a representative student body or organization?:
Yes

A brief description of student representation on the governing body, including how the representatives are selected:

The Student Government Association President is the student representative on the Board of Trustees.


Do students have a formal role in decision-making in regard to the following?:
Yes or No
Establishing organizational mission, vision, and/or goals Yes
Establishing new policies, programs, or initiatives Yes
Strategic and long-term planning Yes
Existing or prospective physical resources Yes
Budgeting, staffing and financial planning Yes
Communications processes and transparency practices Yes
Prioritization of programs and projects Yes

A brief description of the formal student role in regard to each area indicated, including examples from the previous three years:

Establishing new policies, programs, or initiatives: The Student Government Association and student representatives on various University Senate committees are a part of the creation of new policies, programs, and initiatives on campus.
Strategic and long-term planning: Emory's university-wide strategic plan, “Where Courageous Inquiry Leads: 2005-2015”, outlines the university's vision to become a destination university, internationally recognized as an inquiry-driven, ethically engaged, and diverse community whose members work collaboratively for positive transformation in the world through courageous leadership in teaching, research, scholarship, health care and social action. The plan was written by and for all of Emory's stakeholders including, but not limited to, current and prospective students and their families, faculty, staff, alumni, board members, community members, local, statewide, national and international colleagues, and friends of the University.
Existing or prospective physical resources: The Campus Development Committee of the University Senate is responsible for advising the Senate and Administration for matters which affect the appearance and function of the campus environs. The Committee reviews the design and site selection for new buildings and reviews plans for remodeling existing buildings. Additionally, the Committee on the Environment discusses, proposes, creates policy statements, and reviews potential environmental impacts from Emory's activities within the campus and the activities of others which may impact the Emory campus. Student representatives serve on the Campus Development Committee and the Committee on the Environment.
Budgeting, staffing, and financial planning: Emory has several advisory committees with students.   The University Center Board- comprised all of students to direct programming and budget for the Dobbs University Center (DUC), Food Advisory Committee related to Food Services (both retail and residential) on campus, Residence Hall Association (RHA) for Residence Halls, Black Student Union Board, Student Health Advisory Committee, and others. All these committees have programming oversight and input with spending funds.  Students are almost always on search committees for key Campus Life positions.
Communications processes and transparency practices: The University Senate Standing Committee for Open Expression is a working group of community members—faculty, staff, and students—who seek to promote and protect the rights of community members related to issues involving speech, debate, open expression, and protest. The Committee’s primary responsibilities involve educating and advising the Community about rights and responsibilities under this Policy and investigating alleged infringements of those rights through mediation and informal conflict resolution. Its additional responsibilities include mediating when possible during campus incidents in order to prevent conflicts and violations of the Policy, advising administrative officials when requested, and interpreting the Policy at the request of any member of the University community.
Prioritization of programs and projects: As mentioned above, student representatives on the Strategic Plan committee, as well as the various University Senate committees enables students to have a formal role in the prioritization of programs and projects at Emory.


Do all staff, regardless of type or status, have an avenue to participate in one or more governance bodies (through direct participation or the election of representatives)?:
Yes

A brief description of the mechanisms through which all staff have an avenue to participate in one or more governance bodies:

Established in 1970 by the president of Emory University, the Employee Council facilitates communication between Emory employees and university administration and serves as an advisory body to the president.

The Employee Council represents the perspective of employees to the administration (recommending change when appropriate), facilitates communication between the administration and employees at all organizational levels regarding university policies, practices, and programs and fosters closer working relationships between organizational areas and groups of employees.

Members are charged with taking the information they receive at monthly meetings back to their respective areas, as well as soliciting feedback from their colleagues and reporting back to the Employee Council. Employee Council activities include:
Sponsoring the annual Presidential Town Hall
Representing staff concerns in the proposed benefits changes
Addressing questions about shuttle service and parking
Participating in blood drives, book drive, and community service activities
Exploring the Strategic Plan for staff members

Another goal of the Employee Council is to help promote community‐building programs and activities at Emory. These activities include attending performances on campus, tours of new buildings, and athletic events, to mention just a few.

The University Senate is comprised of faculty, staff, and students. The Senate:
considers and makes recommendations regarding all matters of general University interest, including matters referred to it by the President or Board of Trustees
reviews all new policies and changes to existing policies
submits recommendations to the President on any matter affecting the interests of the University
makes recommendations regarding Honorary Degree recipients.
The University Senate is composed of:
Ex officio members from the University Administration
Members of the Faculty Council
Executive board members from the Employee Council, Student Government Association, and Graduate Student Government Association
Faculty and Student Representatives from each School
Representatives from amongst the Alumni, Librarians, Staff, and Academic Deans


Is there at least one non-supervisory staff representative on the institution’s governing body who was elected by peers or appointed by a representative staff body or organization?:
No

A brief description of non-supervisory staff representation on the governing body, including how the representatives are selected:
---

Do non-supervisory staff have a formal role in decision-making in regard to the following? :
Yes or No
Establishing organizational mission, vision, and/or goals Yes
Establishing new policies, programs, or initiatives Yes
Strategic and long-term planning Yes
Existing or prospective physical resources Yes
Budgeting, staffing and financial planning Yes
Communications processes and transparency practices Yes
Prioritization of programs and projects Yes

A brief description of the formal staff role in regard to each area indicated, including examples from the previous three years:

Emory's Strategic Plan task force included non-supervisory staff who helped implement the Plan. The task force's work resulted in institutional changes called for by Emory's 2005-2015 Strategic Plan.
The Committee on Class and Labor includes both hourly and salaried non-supervisory staff and makes recommendations to the President and Board that have resulted in institutional changes.
Non-supervisory staff participated in the Emory Advisory Council on Community and Diversity (ACCD) which was launched in the fall of 2012 to replace Emory’s three president’s commissions. The President’s Commission on the Status of Women (PCSW), the President’s Commission on Race and Ethnicity (PCORE) and the President’s Commission on Sexuality, Gender Diversity and Queer Equality (PCSGDQE) that were established in 1976, 1979, and 1995, respectively. The Council advises the President on diversity-related issues.


Do all faculty, regardless of type or status, have an avenue to participate in one or more governance bodies (through direct participation or the election of representatives)?:
Yes

A brief description of the mechanisms through which all faculty (including adjunct faculty) have an avenue to participate in one or more governance bodies:

The University Faculty Council includes elected and appointed faculty members representing all of the schools and colleges. It serves as the chief representative body of the faculty. The Faculty Council:
considers and makes recommendations to the president concerning the academic affairs of the university; reviews all changes in existing policies or the establishment of new policies related to matters of general interest to the University faculty; monitors and reviews the terms and conditions of faculty employment, the state of facilities, policies that affect scholarship and teaching, budgetary commitments, general financial condition of the University, and relationship between faculty and administration; and considers suggestions and addresses problems and concerns raised by any recognized faculty group.


Is there at least one teaching or research faculty representative on the institution’s governing body who was elected by peers or appointed by a representative faculty body or organization?:
Yes

A brief description of faculty representation on the governing body, including how the representatives are selected:

The Board of Trustees chair appoints Faculty Counselors to serve on several of the major Board of Trustee committees, in accordance with the bylaws. They typically serve a three-year term, other than the president and president-elect of the University Senate (who serve ex officio for one year).


Do faculty have a formal role in decision-making in regard to the following?:
Yes or No
Establishing organizational mission, vision, and/or goals Yes
Establishing new policies, programs, or initiatives Yes
Strategic and long-term planning Yes
Existing or prospective physical resources Yes
Budgeting, staffing and financial planning Yes
Communications processes and transparency practices Yes
Prioritization of programs and projects Yes

A brief description of the formal faculty role in regard to each area indicated, including examples from the previous three years:

Faculty counselors participate in committees of the board of trustees in an advisory capacity:
A Faculty Counselor serves on the Board of Trustees' Campus Life Committee and assisted in a new organizational structure and vision for the Division of Campus Life.
Faculty serve on the Academic Affairs Committee of the Board, and participate in major decisions regarding academic programs at Emory.
The Real Estate, Buildings and Grounds Committee includes a faculty member, and it makes decisions about all capital projects on campus.
Faculty member serve on the Board's Finance Committee and Investments Committee, and, in that capacity weigh in on major financial decisions for the University.
Faculty serve on university-wide special committees.
The University Faculty Council advises the president and provost on existing and new policies, programs, and initiatives related to faculty.
The University Senate advises the president on existing and new policies, programs, and initiatives related to faculty, students, and staff.
Faculty counselors participate on the board of trustees committee that pertains to buildings and grounds in an advisory capacity.
Faculty counselors participate on the financial and investment committees of the board of trustees in an advisory capacity.
Faculty serve on an advisory committee to the Executive Vice President for Finance and Administration to discuss financial and administrative issues of the university and to communicate them to other faculty.
Faculty serve on search committees for new Deans of units and for senior financial administrators of the university.
Faculty serve in the Provost’s office to assist with developing data systems for transparency of reporting on standard academic indicators; budget-related issues.
The University Senate and Faculty Council have developed newsletters to report on policy-related issues and programs discussed in those forums.
The Provost and President have advisory committees that include representation of the faculty.


The website URL where information about the institution’s governance structure is available:

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.