Overall Rating Expired
Overall Score Expired
Liaison Ciannat Howett
Submission Date July 25, 2014
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

Emory University
OP-27: Rainwater Management

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete Expired Brent Zern
Environmental Engineer
Campus Services
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution use Low Impact Development (LID) practices as a matter of policy or standard practice to reduce rainwater/stormwater runoff volume and improve outgoing water quality for new construction, major renovation, and other projects?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s Low Impact Development (LID) practices:

As part of the Campus Master Plan 2005 Update, Emory University produced a Stormwater Master Plan that incorporates best management practices (BMPs) needed to address current stormwater system shortcomings and reduce the impact of continuing development on the watershed receiving streams. The plan addresses water quality and quantity design guidelines and references both existing and future stormwater systems. All new, large capital projects have underground "water quality devices" (aka, CrystalStream units) installed to filter rainwater to county and state code requirements.


Has the institution adopted a rainwater/stormwater management policy, plan, or strategies that mitigate the rainwater runoff impacts of ongoing campus operations through the use of green infrastructure? :
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s rainwater/stormwater management policy, plan, and/or strategies for ongoing campus operations:

Emory has incorporated several green infrastructure strategies regarding stormwater. Pervious pavement, several bioswales, irrigation cisterns, the above-mentioned CrystalStream units, and an innovative stormwater harvesting system are all examples.


A brief description of any rainwater harvesting employed by the institution:

Besides collection in cisterns for irrigation use, one of Emory's residence halls employs a stormwater harvesting system that captures and reuses rainwater for toilet flush water in the building.


Rainwater harvested directly and stored/used by the institution, performance year:
1000000 Gallons

A brief description of any rainwater filtering systems employed by the institution to treat water prior to release:

Two bio-retention areas were installed during renovations of shuttle and passenger drop-off circles, and a bioswale was installed adjacent to the Emory University Hospital valet drop-off. All three systems are planted and landscaped with low-water use materials, and designed to reduce stormwater runoff volumes and provide water quality treatment and filtration of stormwater before it enters the watershed. Additionally, a rain garden is being installed at the new Raoul Hall.


A brief description of any living or vegetated roofs on campus:

Currently, Emory has two vegetated plazas over two different parking decks and two experimental green roofs, one being managed via academic research and the other by Emory's Campus Planning department.


A brief description of any porous (i.e. permeable) paving employed by the institution:

Emory has fire lanes and other low-traffic areas where grass pavers are used to provide a stable road base yet allow for adequate stormwater infiltration. A porous concrete pavement was installed in a small parking lot last summer.


A brief description of any downspout disconnection employed by the institution:
---

A brief description of any rain gardens on campus:


Two bio-retention areas were installed during renovations of shuttle and passenger drop-off circles, and a bioswale was installed adjacent to the Emory University Hospital valet drop-off. All three systems are planted and landscaped with low-water use materials, and designed to reduce stormwater runoff volumes and provide water quality treatment and filtration of stormwater before it enters the watershed. Additionally, a rain garden is being installed at the new Raoul Hall.


A brief description of any stormwater retention and/or detention ponds employed by the institution:

Emory is an urban campus and, as such, does not have the space for many engineered detention/retention ponds. Most of Emory's water is managed underground in either detention vaults or cisterns. We have 9 cisterns that are used for irrigation. The few ponds we do have are small basins field engineered to fit the natural topography in which they are located.


A brief description of any bioswales on campus (vegetated, compost or stone):

There are various grass swales located on different areas of campus that collect concentrated flows and filter sediments, thereby reducing on-site erosion and downstream sediment loading impacts, respectively.
Two bio-retention areas were installed during renovations of shuttle and passenger drop-off circles, and a bioswale was installed adjacent to the Emory University Hospital valet drop-off. All three systems are planted and landscaped with low-water use materials, and designed to reduce stormwater runoff volumes and provide water quality treatment and filtration of stormwater before it enters the watershed. Additionally, a rain garden is being installed at the new Raoul Hall.


A brief description of any other rainwater management technologies or strategies employed by the institution:

Emory has several cistern systems that capture runoff and hold it for reuse. We also utilize bio-swales and stormwater leaching (i.e. groundwater recharge) systems that collect runoff quickly and then hold it to allow for slow leaching back into the subsurface. This is the currently preferred stormwater management strategy given Georgia's drought conditions.


The website URL where information about the institution’s rainwater management initiatives, plan or policy is available:

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.