Overall Rating Expired
Overall Score Expired
Liaison Ciannat Howett
Submission Date July 25, 2014
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

Emory University
OP-11: Biodiversity

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete Expired Emily Cumbie-Drake
Sustainability Programs Coordinator
Office of Sustainability Initiatives
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution own or manage land that includes or is adjacent to legally protected areas, internationally recognized areas, priority sites for biodiversity, and/or regions of conservation importance?:
Yes

A brief description of any legally protected areas, internationally recognized areas, priority sites for biodiversity, and/or regions of conservation importance on institution owned or managed land:

Right in the middle of Emory's campus, Lullwater Preserve offers acres of green space with trees, lawns and a lake for community members to enjoy. The estate is home to an English Tudor mansion where the University president lives.. Lullwater Preserve has been identified as preserved land on Emory’s campus which is prohibited from being developed due to its unique ecological value and essential contribution to the campus identify and quality of life.

Emory University has set aside a total of 306 acres of preserved land, including Lullwater, which are priority sites for biodiversity and important for conservation because of the forested habitat connectivity purpose they serve, in addition to the protection of stream habitats and the preservation of native Piedmont forest ecosystem biodiversity.


Has the institution conducted an assessment or assessments to identify endangered and vulnerable species with habitats on institution-owned or –managed land?:
Yes

Has the institution conducted an assessment or assessments to identify environmentally sensitive areas on institution-owned or –managed land?:
Yes

The methodology(-ies) used to identify endangered and vulnerable species and/or environmentally sensitive areas and any ongoing assessment and monitoring mechanisms:

Species lists of amphibians and reptiles residing in Lullwater were compiled from biology class trips and research papers. Species lists of birds were compiled from biology class trips, individuals' visits and the Atlanta Audubon Society's list of birds' arrival/departure dates.
The Committee on the Environment/Lullwater Task Force Subcommittee, comprised of staff, faculty and student representatives, began working in May 2001 to:
• Inventory the current ecological health of Lullwater, i.e., the state of vegetation, wildlife and streams.
• Review all available data on the numbers of people regularly visiting Lullwater to determine the type of use and where activities are concentrated within the preserve.
• Examine current guidelines for accessing Lullwater’s resources, including the campus forest use policy, and document problems that may have occurred regarding enforcement of these guidelines.
• Propose a plan for restoring the ecological health of Lullwater and managing sustainable human use of the preserve.


A brief description of identified species, habitats and/or environmentally sensitive areas:

All of Emory's protected land falls in Georgia’s Piedmont region and is home to a variety of habitats and vegetation. Lullwater contains areas of hardwood forest dominated by Oak and Oak Beech species, a section of mature Hardwood Forest, mixed forest, floodplain forest, wetlands, and turf.

Areas that are the most environmentally sensitive are the small streams which have been impaired by storm water runoff and the after-effects of dredging Candler Lake in the 1980s. Since then, most sensitive areas have been vegetated to prevent erosion. Forest edges caused by past clearings are another sensitive area because this area is open to cultivation by invasive species.

A complete list of species residing in Lullwater can be found here: http://sustainability.emory.edu/uploads/press/2014/03/2014031314311242/merged_document.pdf.


A brief description of plans or programs in place to protect or positively affect identified species, habitats and/or environmentally sensitive areas:

In regards to protecting wildlife habitat on institution-owned land, Emory University's Campus Master Plan (2005) has committed to leave 48% of its land undeveloped. Beginning in 2003, a University policy has required that campus land suffer "no net loss of forest canopy", ensuring every time a tree is removed, trees are replanted to maintain the same forest canopy.

The University’s 2005 Campus Master Plan categorized 26% of Emory's total campus area as Restricted Land. These areas, i.e., stream buffers and floodplains, are precluded from development by law, ordinance, or covenant. 22% of Emory's total campus area has been identified as Preserved Land. These areas, including the forests of Lullwater Preserve, should not be developed due to their unique ecological value and essential contribution to the campus identity and quality of life.


The website URL where information about the institution’s biodiversity policies and programs(s) is available:

List of wildlife species in Lullwater Preserve---http://www.emory.edu/home/about/anniversary/175-of-everything/wildlife.html#Birds:%20Spring/Fall%20Migrants
Lullwater Comprehensive Management Plan--http://sustainability.emory.edu/uploads/press/2014/03/2014031314311242/merged_document.pdf
No Net Loss of Forest Canopy Policy--http://www.campserv.emory.edu/facilities_management/Documents/forest_canopy.pdf

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