Overall Rating Bronze
Overall Score 42.75
Liaison John Stolz
Submission Date Feb. 28, 2019
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

Duquesne University
PA-3: Participatory Governance

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 0.75 / 3.00
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Do the institution’s students have a representative body through which they can participate in governance (e.g. a student council)? :
Yes

Do the institution’s students have an elected representative on the institution’s highest governing body?:
No

A brief description of the bodies and mechanisms through which students are engaged in governance, including information to support each affirmative response above:

Students can participate via the Student Government Association. Each of Duquesne University's School's has a Senate seat for every 200 students. Additionally the elected Executive Board is able to work on the highest governing body on campus.


Do the institution’s staff members have a representative body through which they can participate in governance (e.g. a staff council)?:
Yes

Do the institution’s non-supervisory staff members have an elected representative on the institution’s highest governing body?:
No

A brief description of the bodies and mechanisms through which staff are engaged in governance, including information to support each affirmative response above:

The mission of the Duquesne University Staff Advisory Council (DUSAC) is to provide active and direct communication to appropriate University officials on matters of interest or concern to University non-faculty, non-union employees. DUSAC is a forum for input and discussion of issues important to staff members, supporting the Duquesne University Mission. DUSAC does not address subjects within the purview of existing University committees or individual complaints/grievances.


Do the institution’s teaching and research faculty have a representative body through which they can participate in governance (e.g. a faculty senate)?:
Yes

Do the institution’s teaching and research faculty have an elected representative on the institution’s highest governing body? :
No

A brief description of the bodies and mechanisms through which teaching and research faculty are engaged in governance, including information to support each affirmative response above:

The mission, as stated in the Faculty Senate Constitution, shall be to provide a forum for mutual understanding and effective communication between the faculty and other interdependent components within the University. The Faculty Senate shall be the voice of a collective faculty view in matters of concern to them and establish an effective means by which the faculty can contribute to the governance of the University.


Does the institution have written policies and procedures to identify and engage external stakeholders (i.e. local residents) in land use planning, capital investment projects, and other institutional decisions that affect the community?:
No

A copy of the written policies and procedures:
The policies and procedures:

Throughout its history, our University has contributed to the dramatic development of the city, the region, the nation, the Catholic Diocese that
serves as its home, and its partners around the globe. The challenges that confront communities today—locally, nationally and internationally—make Duquesne
an invaluable partner. In the role of a servant leader, therefore, Duquesne will
• refashion and broaden its community engagement initiatives to develop authentic, mutually beneficial alliances with governmental, faith-based and community organizations, focusing in particular on those in the Hill District,
Uptown, the Mon Valley and other underserved areas;
• enhance the University’s community engagement initiatives so as to promote civic awareness among students, faculty and staff, and support
the work that results;
• play a central role in the development and sustainability of the Uptown Eco-Innovation District along the Forbes and Fifth Avenue corridors adjoining the Duquesne campus;
• collaborate with the Diocese of Pittsburgh and other dioceses to assist in the development of their lay associates and clergy as these dioceses reconfigure themselves for the 21st century;
• develop creative programs for students in diocesan and public schools, including in underserved areas, through a new “Duquesne Prep” initiative as well as educational programming for senior citizens in the community;
• expand global engagement by solidifying rich existing relationships in Africa while also exploring new connections in areas of the world where Spiritans are already present or their Mission needed;
• expose students to languages, cultures and religions that differ from their own in order to encourage them to respond to the needs of others; and
• ensure that all students have an opportunity for an international and/or intercultural experience during their time at Duquesne.


Does the institution have formal participatory or shared governance bodies through which community members representing the interests of the following stakeholder groups can regularly participate in institutional governance?:
Yes or No
Local government and/or educational organizations No
Private sector organizations No
Civil society (e.g. NGOs, NPOs) No

A brief description of the bodies and mechanisms through which external stakeholders are engaged in institutional governance (including information about each stakeholder group selected above):

Throughout its history, our University has contributed to the dramatic development of the city, the region, the nation, the Catholic Diocese that
serves as its home, and its partners around the globe. The challenges that confront communities today—locally, nationally and internationally—make Duquesne
an invaluable partner. In the role of a servant leader, therefore, Duquesne will
• refashion and broaden its community engagement initiatives to develop authentic, mutually beneficial alliances with governmental, faith-based and community organizations, focusing in particular on those in the Hill District,
Uptown, the Mon Valley and other underserved areas;
• enhance the University’s community engagement initiatives so as to promote civic awareness among students, faculty and staff, and support
the work that results;
• play a central role in the development and sustainability of the Uptown Eco-Innovation District along the Forbes and Fifth Avenue corridors adjoining the Duquesne campus;
• collaborate with the Diocese of Pittsburgh and other dioceses to assist in the development of their lay associates and clergy as these dioceses reconfigure themselves for the 21st century;
• develop creative programs for students in diocesan and public schools, including in underserved areas, through a new “Duquesne Prep” initiative as well as educational programming for senior citizens in the community;
• expand global engagement by solidifying rich existing relationships in Africa while also exploring new connections in areas of the world where Spiritans are already present or their Mission needed;
• expose students to languages, cultures and religions that differ from their own in order to encourage them to respond to the needs of others; and
• ensure that all students have an opportunity for an international and/or intercultural experience during their time at Duquesne.


The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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