Overall Rating Expired
Overall Score Expired
Liaison Tavey Capps
Submission Date Feb. 25, 2015
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

Duke University
PA-2: Sustainability Planning

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete Expired Tavey Capps
Environmental Sustainability Director
Office of the Executive Vice President
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have current and formal plans to advance sustainability in the following areas? Do the plans include measurable objectives?:
Current and Formal Plans (Yes or No) Measurable Objectives (Yes or No)
Curriculum Yes Yes
Research (or other scholarship) Yes No
Campus Engagement Yes Yes
Public Engagement Yes Yes
Air and Climate Yes Yes
Buildings Yes Yes
Dining Services/Food Yes Yes
Energy Yes Yes
Grounds Yes No
Purchasing Yes No
Transportation Yes Yes
Waste Yes Yes
Water Yes Yes
Diversity and Affordability Yes No
Health, Wellbeing and Work --- ---
Investment Yes No
Other --- ---

A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Curriculum:

Incorporate sustainability into the depth and breadth of every student’s experience by including core concepts of sustainability in every applicable field and research opportunity and by using the campus as a living laboratory for sustainability.

Offer 5th Trillium Workshop in January 2015 and deepen sustainability education in classes taught by current Fellows

Host the new Unpark Yourself Challenge alternative transportation competition for employees and graduate students in spring 2015.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Curriculum plan(s):

Continued development of an undergraduate, experiential certificate in Sustainability Engagement that includes 450 hours of experiential learning outside the classroom.

Initiated pilot of an international Sustainability Literacy Test on campus to assess changes in undergraduate sustainability literacy and skill development at the beginning and end of their Duke careers.

Over 400 courses with sustainability-related content were offered to students in academic year 2013-14.

Continued to train faculty to integrate sustainability
into their courses with the Trillium Program. As of FY14, 9 external participants and 54 Duke Trillium Fellows have completed the workshop

Expand the Learning & Organizational Development sustainability workshop series for employees to specialized topics such as alternative transportation and carbon offsets.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Curriculum plan(s):

Sustainable Duke


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Research (or other scholarship):

Increase existing engagement with faculty and students by participating in additional academic research projects on greenhouse gas reduction related topics. Opportunities include: Bass Connections, group Master’s projects, in-class research projects, and more.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Research plan(s):

In 2013, Sustainable Duke worked with the Office of Research Support to utilize the Sponsored Projects Systems Database to search by key word for sustainability related research funded in the past three years. This identified research in numerous departments across Duke focusing on a myriad of sustainability themes.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Research plan(s):

Research has been completed with...
Duke Lemur Center
Organization for Tropical Studies
Duke University Wetland Center
Center for Energy, Development, and the Global Environment
Duke University Energy Initiative
Center for the Advancement of Social Entrepreneurship
Duke Center for Civic Engagement
Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions
Center on Global Change
Sustainable Apparel Coalition
Center on Globalization, Governance & Competitiveness
Duke Global Health Institute
Hubert-Yeargan Center for Global Health
Duke Environmental Law & Policy Forum Journal


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance Campus Engagement around sustainability:

The Duke University campus offers many living laboratories for diverse educational experiences in sustainability. Students can select from a list of on-campus and community sustainability project ideas in energy, water, recycling, transportation and carbon offsets.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Campus Engagement plan:

Developed an updated Sustainability Communications Plan to build on previous success, make progress more visible and continue to influence positive behavior changes across campus.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Campus Engagement plan(s):

Sustainable Duke


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance Public Engagement around sustainability:

Through the Duke Carbon Offsets Initiative, which was created in 2009, Duke is working with the local community to find carbon offset opportunities.

The DCOI has developed a portfolio approach to generating carbon offsets, focusing on
1. Methane capture projects from North Carolina swine farms through the installation of innovative animal waste management systems. Loyd Ray Farms is the pilot program and current core of DCOI's work;
2. Community-based energy efficiency projects, currently being piloted with Duke University students, faculty, and staff; and
3. The potential for carbon sequestration through forestry and land conservation-based projects


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Public Engagement plan(s):

To meet its goal of climate neutrality by 2024, Duke University will need to offset approximately 185,000 tons of carbon dioxide equivalent-emissions per year, starting in 2024.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Public Engagement plan(s):

Duke Carbon Offsets Initiative


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Air and Climate:

Duke also continues to implement the campus Climate Action Plan (CAP) to reach carbon neutrality by 2024. The FY14 greenhouse gas inventory shows significant progress towards this goal with a 21% reduction of overall GHG emissions from a 2007 baseline.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Air and Climate plan(s):

Created a five-year retrospective report on the Duke Carbon Offsets Initiative (DCOI) and recommendations for moving forward. With 10 years left before 2024, continued exploration of local offset opportunities, financial planning for these projects and leveraging of Duke’s ability to influence local carbon offsets development is essential.

Duke Carbon Offsets Initiative completed evaluation of a pre-pilot energy efficiency program and found that participating houses reduced energy use by an average of 13%. Pre-pilot experience has informed a new Employee Energy Efficiency Pilot program that will assist employees in completing energy saving retrofits on their homes and assess the offset potential of these efforts.

DCOI continued to collaborate with the City and County of Durham to develop an Urban Forest Carbon Offsets Program where Duke would fund local planting projects through the purchase of carbon offsets.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Air and Climate plan(s):

Sustainable Duke


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Buildings:

Finalized a Duke green building guideline that focuses on energy and water efficiency. The intent of this program is to guide design and construction teams in the development of new buildings that operate more efficiently than the existing building stock, and to exceed the current code requirements.Duke currently has 29 LEEDTM certified buildings and
9 buildings registered for future certification; this represents 27% of Duke University’s total square footage.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Buildings plan(s):

In 2011, Duke's Campus Sustainability Committee (CSC) drafted a LEED™ Plus policy that includes:

A documented process for LEED™ scorecard development with energy efficiency approvals;
Energy targets by building tech rating;
Measurement, verification and reporting of energy consumption versus energy modeling; and
A requirement that all value engineering efforts focus on areas outside of energy savings and that any proposed value engineering items within this category shall be accompanied with a full life cycle cost analysis.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Buildings plan(s):

Sustainable Duke


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Dining Services/Food:

Developed a draft definition of sustainable food for Duke in six product categories through assessment of current internal efforts and best practices from peer institutions. Developed broad guidelines for “best practices” in setting and maintaining sustainable sourcing goals in dining services at Duke.

As the Campus Sustainability Committee moves forward with this effort to hopefully determine quantifiable goals around sustainable food procurement it will be increasingly important to collaborate with campus stakeholders and local growers to be innovative in mitigating potential cost increases and demands on staff time. Duke will also emphasize communication of these efforts through educational labeling of products and incorporating sustainable food into coursework and research on campus.

Each year since 2010, students in Sustainable Duke’s Students for Sustainable Living program have selected winning eateries to be recognized with a Green Dining Award at Duke.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Dining Services/Food plan(s):

While hosting over 2,000 volunteer hours and many campus engagement opportunities such as Project Build and Alternative Spring Break, the Duke Campus Farm developed a 5-year strategic plan encompassing visions and goals related to both production and education.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Dining Services/Food plan(s):

Duke Campus Farm, Sustainable Duke


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Energy:

Finalized a Duke green building guideline that focuses on energy and water efficiency. The intent of this program is to guide design and construction teams in the development of new buildings that operate more efficiently than the existing building stock, and to exceed the current code requirements.Duke currently has 29 LEEDTM certified buildings and
9 buildings registered for future certification; this represents 27% of Duke University’s total square footage.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Energy plan(s):

Achieve a 15% reduction in energy in existing buildings by 2030.
Ensure all new construction and major renovations are certified with a goal of LEEDTM Silver and meet Duke’s green building guidelines for energy and water efficiency.
Focus water-reduction strategies on the top 20 buildings that account for 70% of the water use at Duke.Ensure that buildings, landscapes and natural areas are developed and sustained to create a campus community that conserves natural resources, restores environmental quality and protects biodiversity.

Implemented School of Medicine energy efficiency measures such as reduction of building air changes, fume hood velocity and LED lighting upgrades. These conservation measures produced $2 million in savings in FY14.

Overall energy greenhouse gas emissions are down 32% from a 2007 baseline. Existing building energy use is down 8% from 2007, and Duke continues to increase campus energy efficiency through projects such as replacing outdoor site lighting and athletic facilities with LED technology.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Energy plan(s):

Sustainable Duke


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Grounds:

Duke has committed significant resources, education and personnel to making the college buildings and grounds sustainable for future generations. The sustainability of the landscape requires planning at all stages of the review process, implementation of plans and a complete comprehensive management plan for maintenance

Duke is finding new and innovative ways to maintain the landscape including using environmentally-safe equipment and processes, recycling all reusable materials, capturing water for future use and preventing unnecessary runoff, using permeable vs. non-permeable materials, all while being cognizant of and consistent with campus planning and design objectives.

Goals include:
Develop and implement irrigation system management plan
Install additional collection systems for rainwater and condensate
Update current maintenance vehicles to use alternative fuels
Install solar panels to charge electric vehicles
Use organic fertilizers more
Continue to educate workforce
Coordinate all aspects of the planning and installation process of landscape projects
Reuse all uncontaminated organic material generated by Duke
Implement tree protection policy
Continue to survey and document trees and tree health throughout grounds
GIS all major landscape
Update all metrics for landscape sites


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Grounds plan(s):

Duke is committed to conserving green space on campus. In the 2000 Master Plan, "conservation zones" were designated for protection on campus. Assets to be conserved include forested areas, fragile ecological areas, riparian corridors, the Sarah P. Duke Gardens and central open spaces such as the historic quadrangles.

The plan also envisions the role for Duke as an integral part of the surrounding region’s economy, environment and community fabric. In fulfilling this commitment to conserving green spaces on campus, Duke has supported downtown revitalization efforts through strategic redevelopment of historic buildings. Since 2004, the University has moved over 1,000 staff into the restored Smith Warehouse, the American Tobacco District and the Fuller Street Powerhouse Building.

Natural Heritage Areas Registry - Duke University has signed an agreement with the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) to place 1,220 acres of Duke Forest in the Registry of Natural Heritage Areas, setting it aside from development and invasive research.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Grounds plan(s):

Sustainable Duke


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Purchasing:

Duke's Green Purchasing Program helps University purchasers and employees make environmentally responsible purchasing decisions to reduce negative effects on human health and the environment.

In July of 2004, Duke adopted a set of Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Guidelines (PDF) to reduce our environmental impact in six strategic areas:

Source Reduction
Forest Conservation
Recycled Content
Landscaping
Energy & Water
Toxics & Pollution


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Purchasing plan(s):

Revise Duke’s current environmentally preferable purchasing policy to make it more accessible and useful for campus purchasers while exploring opportunities to further green Duke’s supply chain.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Purchasing plan(s):

Sustainable Duke


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Transportation:

Created targeted transportation reports for individual schools at Duke to provide personalized outreach and alternative commute planning. Hired a part-time Transportation Demand Management Outreach Coordinator to assist with marketing and promotion of sustainable transportation programs at Duke. Continued to reduce single occupancy vehicle trips trips by employees in the University (including Schools of Medicine/Nursing) by 4% since 2012.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Transportation plan(s):

Achieve a 5% reduction in single occupancy vehicle (SOV) trips by all Duke employees by 2018 from 2013 baseline. The University remains committed to the long-term mode share goal set in the CAP to decrease the campus drive alone rate to 45% by 2050.

Initiate a transit planning study with local and regional partners to identify service gaps and opportunities to improve level of service for Duke commuters. Improve targeted marketing and personal commute coaching to reach unique employee cohorts.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Transportation plan(s):

Sustainable Duke


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Waste:

Develop future roll-out options for expanding campus recycling and composting efforts. Expand Zero Waste efforts to campus athletic events.

Continue to evaluate the effectiveness and efficacy of several pilot waste reduction programs including post-consumer composting, mixed recycling, mini-trash bins and standardized waste stations in buildings.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Waste plan(s):

Duke Recycles services nearly 1,600 recycling bins, collecting 17 different items. Deposit paper, newspaper and magazines, cardboard, bottles and cans, and plastics #1-7 in recycling bins around campus and help Duke prevent recyclable materials from entering landfills.

Today, Duke Recycles has become a necessary part of campus operation, with a staff of five full-time recyclers and several part-time student staff. This diverse team allows the Duke Recycles program to maintain its roots as a student-involved environmental organization.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Waste plan(s):

Duke Recycles
Arwen Buchholz, Duke's Recycling and Waste Reduction Coordinator


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Water:

Water efficiency retrofits have been completed in 15 campus buildings over the past two years. For both phases of the project, Duke expects savings to total 15 million gallons per year. Overall 43% reduction in potable water usage since 2006.

Conservation measures identified by a water audit of 6 buildings in 2012 are expected to produce an 8 million gallon reduction in water consumption each year at Duke. A new reclamation pond will collect rainwater and runoff from 22 percent of the main campus area for use in a nearby chilled water plant, which pumps water across campus to cool buildings. The pond is expected to save about 100 million gallons of potable water a year. Duke is also helping to improve the watershed it relies on through a stream restoration project on campus.

Recognizing the negative environmental and social impacts of bottled water, Duke University has recently undertaken several efforts to reduce consumption of single use bottled water on campus.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Water plan(s):

Construction continued on the campus water reclamation pond, scheduled to be completed in early 2015. In addition to helping reduce Duke’s reliance on potable water by 100 million gallons, the 5.5 acre pond will provide important new habitat areas to the campus and improve water quality downstream.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Water plan(s):

Sustainable Duke


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance Diversity and Affordability:

Under the auspices of the President, the Office for Institutional Equity provides institutional leadership in enhancing respectful, diverse and inclusive work and learning environments for the Duke Community. We provide a range of services that uphold values of equity and diversity, as well as support compliance efforts in the areas of equal opportunity, affirmative action and harassment prevention.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Diversity and Affordability plan(s):

This “Diversity Toolkit” has been compiled as part of OIE’s ongoing effort to provide resources to the whole Duke community, including all staff, faculty, and students across the University and the Health System. Each and every one of us carries responsibility for our workplace culture and educational climate at Duke. The toolkit can be used as an adjunct to the educational programs OIE already offers to departments and teams, or as a resource in developing strategies and plans to improve inclusion and engagement within a new initiative. The Diversity Toolkit provides links to publications (books, journals, reports, etc.), as well as links to electronic sources (websites, blogs, etc.). In the rapidly evolving field of diversity and inclusion, it is critically important that higher education and healthcare professionals keep abreast of research, new theories and approaches to diversity and inclusion, as well as strategies to enhance equity and high performance within the educational, healthcare and work environments of Duke.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Diversity and Affordability plan(s):

The Office for Institutional Equity

Other Diversity Resources Include:

Office for Institutional Equity
Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity
Center for Multicultural Affairs
International House
Jewish Life at Duke
Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture
Muslim Life
Women’s Center


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Health, Wellbeing and Work:

The Duke Student Wellness Center is dedicated to fostering a living/learning environment on campus and within the surrounding community that encourages the full development of the individual as an engaged member of the community. Part of the Duke Student Wellness's Center is an emphasis on environmental wellness.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Health, Wellbeing and Work plan(s):
---

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Health, Wellbeing and Work plan(s):

Duke Student Wellness Center


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Investment:

Duke University’s endowment is managed by DUMAC, LLC. DUMAC, LLC, also manages the employees’ retirement pool and Duke University Health System’s investments, and invests much of the University’s working capital.

To provide guidance to DUMAC, LLC, Duke has established a process for addressing investments that raise moral or ethical issues. While the primary fiduciary responsibility of the Board of Trustees is to oversee the management of the University’s investment assets to maximize return, the University is interested in maintaining socially responsible investments. As such, Duke University makes special considerations for moral and ethical issues raised by members of the University community with regard to investments. An example of such action was a resolution in 2008 that prohibits Duke from making future direct investment in companies engaged in business with the government of Sudan.

Sustainable Investment Highlights:

Several of the companies in which Duke is invested that produce exemplary environmental technologies are highlighted below:

A123 Systems – A123 Systems creates lithium ion batteries for electric cars and other applications, as well as energy storage systems for a smarter electricity grid.
SatCon Technology Corporation – SatCon Technology Corporation develops innovative power conversion solutions and provides system design services for utility-scale renewable energy plants.
1366 Technologies - With the mantra “solar at the cost of coal,” 1366 Technologies develops innovative manufacturing solutions for silicon cell manufacturers, including wafer and cell technologies that may cut the cost of installed solar power by more than fifty percent.

Additional areas of environmentally sustainable investments include, but are not limited to:

Greenhouse gas capture and carbon credit generation (coal mine methane and landfill gas capture)
Alternative energy sources (wind, hydro, biofuels, geothermal, solar, fuel cells)
“Smart Grid” technologies (energy consumption management software and solutions)
Recycling (soils, metals, rubber, biomass)
Consumer products (organic foods, recycling incentives, packaging, automobiles)


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Investment plan(s):
---

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Investment plan(s):

DUMAC, LLC


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in other areas:
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The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the other plan(s):
---

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the other plan(s):
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The institution’s definition of sustainability:

Sustainability is defined as meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. This must be achieved in a manner that is ecologically sound, socially just, and economically viable.


Does the institution’s strategic plan or equivalent guiding document include sustainability at a high level?:
Yes

A brief description of how the institution’s strategic plan or equivalent guiding document addresses sustainability:

Duke is developing a Sustainability Strategic Plan as an extension of the Climate Action Plan to focus on a broader spectrum of areas within campus sustainability. The Sustainability Strategic Plan addresses sustainability topics including water conservation, recycling, and land management.

The Sustainability Strategic Plan Progress Report outlines the goals, progress and areas of future focus for four key areas: Emissions & Carbon Offsets, Infrastructure, Campus Operations, and Education & Engagement.


The website URL where information about the institution’s sustainability planning is available:

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