Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 73.84
Liaison Careen Arsenault
Submission Date Feb. 27, 2019
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

Cornell University
EN-1: Student Educators Program

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 4.00 / 4.00 Sarah Zemanick
Director, Campus Sustainability Office
FS - Energy & Sustainability
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Number of students enrolled for credit (headcount):
23162

Total number of students enrolled for credit that are served (i.e. directly targeted) by a student peer-to-peer sustainability outreach and education program (avoid double-counting to the extent feasible):
23162

Percentage of students served by a peer-to-peer educator program:
100

Name of the student educators program:
ALS 2000: Leadership for Sustainability course

Number of students served (i.e. directly targeted) by the program (headcount):
3000

A brief description of the program, including examples of peer-to-peer outreach activities:

The ALS 2000: Leadership for Sustainability course is a 3-credit course taught each semester that focuses on developing climate solutions for first-year and upper-level residential communities. The course is co-taught by Professor Mike Hoffman, and staff members Kimberly Anderson, Sarah Brylinsky (Campus Sustainability Office), Karel Hilversum, Marcus Brooks (Cornell Team and Leadership Center). Any student can take the course for one semester. The course description follows: "This course develops leadership, project management, research, and behavior change skills needed to become effective leaders for sustainability and climate change solutions on campus and beyond. Students will acquire knowledge about the effects of energy use on climate change, and analyze which sustainable actions have the greatest impact on reducing energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. Students will learn to design, coordinate, and implement behavior change programs focused on reducing building energy use on campus in collaboration with campus partners. Students will develop their leadership, teamwork, and conflict management skills, and participate in active self-reflection to improve their understanding for how best to influence, motivate, and collaborate with people to improve sustainable outcomes for our world."

In Spring 2018, 19 students completed nine projects which impacted approximately 3000 students.


A brief description of how the student educators are selected:

The ALS 2000 course is open to new and returning students. The course is available during the course registration process and listed in the Courses of Study guide. The course is advertised during orientation, and via events and emails during the fall semester.


A brief description of the formal training that the student educators receive to prepare them to conduct peer outreach:

The course meets on Tuesdays from 1:25-4:10pm in the spring semester, and divides the content of the course between leadership development (including self-assessments and self-reflection), and sustainability and energy conservation content. The course uses the Community-Based Social Marketing research framework to design, implement, and evaluate projects in residential communities -- in partnership with residential and facilities staff within project buildings.


A brief description of the financial and/or administrative support the institution provides to the program (e.g. annual budget and/or faculty/staff coordination):

The Campus Sustainability Office (CSO) funds Cornell Outdoor Education's involvement in the class, which includes the administration of several leadership assessments for each student like the Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode assessment (~$4000/semester). The CSO also provides each project team with a budget of ~$100 ($1000 total) to purchase materials for their project (e.g. stickers, printing posters, surge protectors, drying racks).

The course is administered through Blackboard, and receives course support from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.


Name of the student educators program (2nd program):
EcoRep Orientation Leaders

Number of students served (i.e. directly targeted) by the program (2nd program):
4000

A brief description of the program, including examples of peer-to-peer outreach activities (2nd program):

EcoRep Orientation Leaders spearhead the effort to educate all incoming first-year students and transfer students about composting and recycling during New Student Orientation. These volunteers monitor composting and recycling stations at events and educate their peers about recycling and composting at each site.

https://sustainablecampus.cornell.edu/programs-guides/student-resources


A brief description of how the student educators are selected (2nd program):

EcoRep Orientation Leaders are a subset of Orientation Leaders (OLs) recruited by the office of New Student Programs to assist with Opening Day and Orientation. Thus, they were recruited through the Orientation Leader application form; all interested volunteers were selected.


A brief description of the formal training that the student educators receive to prepare them to conduct peer outreach (2nd program):

EcoRep Orientation Leaders participate in a one-hour training, provided by the Campus Sustainability Office, preparing them to facilitate proper waste sorting at orientation events. The training occurs at the end of the broader Orientation Leader training.


A brief description of the financial and/or administrative support the institution provides to the program (e.g. annual budget and/or faculty/staff coordination) (2nd program):

The EcoRep Orientation Leader program is organized by the Campus Sustainability Office (CSO) in partnership with New Student Programs (NSP). Development and delivery of training are provided by the CSO; logistics for training and recruitment are supported by NSP; EcoRep OL supplies are purchased by the CSO (e.g. blue tape, waste signage, gloves, t-shirts, paper bags for compost, compost liners); and the event coordination, scheduling, and on-site communication with EcoRep OLs is managed by the CSO (including a paid intern).


Name of the student educators program (3rd program):
Dilmun Hill Student Farm

Number of students served (i.e. directly targeted) by the program (3rd program):
2000

A brief description of the program, including examples of peer-to-peer outreach activities (3rd program):

Student-operated organic farm offers tours to agriculture classes in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, sells produce to the cooperative residences on campus, holds yoga classes for students on the farm, recruits farm managers and workers, provides an on-campus farm stand and offers produce shares to students. Offers tours, events, and classes on land supplied by the university since 1996.

https://sustainablecampus.cornell.edu/campus-initiatives/food/dilmun-hill-farm


A brief description of how the student educators are selected (3rd program):

The farm managers are in paid positions under the supervision of a professor and can register for an agricultural practicum course as Teaching Assistants. The farm managers go through a competitive application process every spring. The Outreach and Education section of the farm makes use of managers, volunteers, and student researchers as appropriate, and the section is supervised by professional staff.


A brief description of the formal training that the student educators receive to prepare them to conduct peer outreach (3rd program):

The farm hosts regular work parties where volunteers learn about sustainable agricultural practices. Student researchers help with daily operations through 2-4 hours per week of work in the fields. Students propose and apply to conduct research projects. There is a faculty, staff, and student advisory board that creates policy and provides continuity of knowledge and operations. A professional organic coordinator is employed by the farm, and there are four faculty/staff board members. The steering committee and farm managers receive independent-study credit as they do hands-on learning and management.


A brief description of the financial and/or administrative support the institution provides to the program (e.g. annual budget and/or faculty/staff coordination) (3rd program):

Student managers are in paid positions, the university provides land and facilities to operate the farm, the organic coordinator is a full time university position, and numerous faculty and staff support the operations and make use of the farm for instruction and research. The farm is housed under the Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station and engages a number of Cooperative Extension specialists and volunteers as well.


A brief description of all other student peer-to-peer sustainability outreach and education programs, including the number of students served and how student educators are selected, trained, and supported by the institution:

Anabel's Grocery is "for students, by students," and its grocery store and programming opportunities are open and accessible to all 23,600 students on campus. Students can apply to join the Anabel's Grocery leadership team by sending an application and resume to the Director of HR (student). Students can also volunteer by signing up through their website. Leaders and volunteers receive ample training on-site. Anabel's provides nutritious, affordable food for all Cornell students through a student-run grocery store and offers educational programs that create a fun, inclusive, empowering community around quality food, food choices, wellness, and positive social change. Anabel's Grocery was created and designed by students with the support of Cornell staff and faculty for over 2 years. Anabel's is supported by the Center for Transformative Action; its housed in an on-campus building; an academic course supports its development through research. Anabel's provides free, quality, perishable food for students over academic breaks (e.g. Fall Break, Thanksgiving Break, February Break). https://www.facebook.com/anabelsgrocery/


Total number of hours student educators are engaged in peer-to-peer sustainability outreach and education activities annually (all programs):
200500

The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.