Overall Rating Silver
Overall Score 48.37
Liaison Calandra Lake
Submission Date Dec. 20, 2016
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

College of William & Mary
PA-7: Affordability and Access

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 3.67 / 4.00 Calandra Waters Lake
Director of Sustainability
Office of Sustainability
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have policies and programs to make it accessible and affordable to low-income students?:
Yes

A brief description of any policies and programs to minimize the cost of attendance for low-income students:

W&M Promise
Most Virginians pay less under the W&M Promise. For incoming freshmen, the plan provides a lower "net price" for all low- and middle-income* Virginia families qualifying for need-based financial aid. As an example, for a family of four with two children in college and a combined household income of $100,000, the annual total cost in 2013-14 (including tuition, fees, room and board, books, travel and incidentals) after grants and financial aid was actually $1,000 less than it would have been under the old model. Previously, that family paid $16,515 through their own funds, loans and work-study. Under the W&M Promise, that cost was reduced to $15,515. The total cost includes $3,250 estimated for books, travel and incidentals.

In addition to need-based aid, W&M is committed to helping promising students – both in-state and out-of-state – access the distinct brand of education that William & Mary offers through a mix of scholarships and other financial aid support. To that end, the university has made scholarships a top priority in the recently launched fundraising campaign, and we aspire to raise $350 million to help remove financial barriers that prevent talented students from attending William & Mary.


A brief description of any programs to equip the institution’s faculty and staff to better serve students from low-income backgrounds:
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A brief description of the institution’s programs to guide and prepare students and families from low-income backgrounds for higher education:

All admitted students who meet two or more of the following five criteria—underrepresented racial or ethnic background, first-generation college student, graduate of a high schools where 50% or less go on to attend four- year colleges and universities, and low-income background—will be invited to apply to W&M's week-long Preparing for Life as a University Student (PLUS) pro- gram during the summer prior to enrollment. The purpose of the PLUS program, which is run by the director of W&M's Center for Student Diversity, is to provide a positive, transitional summer experience between high school and college life. The cost of attendance, including room and board, is covered in full by W&M.


A brief description of the institution's scholarships for low-income students:

W&M awards approximately 40 enrolling students per year a William & Mary Scholar award, which is equal to the full amount of in-state tu- ition and fees. Recipients are admitted students who are achieving at a high level academically, have overcome significant adversity and/or would contribute to the diversity of the campus. Many will be the first members of their family to attend a four-year college or university. All recipients also are invited to participate in the the William & Mary Scholars Undergraduate Research Experience (WMSURE) program, which supports William & Mary Scholars with workshops, guidance and social opportunities designed to instill an interest in academic research.

In addition to need-based aid, W&M is committed to helping promising students – both in-state and out-of-state – access the distinct brand of education that William & Mary offers through a mix of scholarships and other financial aid support. To that end, the university has made scholarships a top priority in the recently launched fundraising campaign, and we aspire to raise $350 million to help remove financial barriers that prevent talented students from attending William & Mary.


A brief description of the institution’s targeted outreach to recruit students from low-income backgrounds:

As of October 1, 2016, families will be able to use older tax information in order to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). This change, referred to as the use of "prior-prior year" income data will allow families to submit their financial aid applica- tions earlier in the admission process. As a result, W&M's admission and financial aid teams are likely to have better information sooner and will be able to use that to target their outreach to students from low-income backgrounds.
In late February, 2016, the admission office brought nearly 100 high school counselors to campus for a new program that prominently featured the impact of the W&M Promise and how it creates affordability for in-state students with the greatest financial need.


A brief description of the institution’s other policies or programs to make the institution accessible and affordable to low-income students:
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Does the institution have policies and programs to support non-traditional students?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s scholarships provided specifically for part-time students:

School of Education Tieso Family Scholarship: For in-service educators who are enrolled part-time in a master's degree program in the School of Education at The College of William & Mary. Preference will be given to educators currently working in the following school divisions: New Kent County, Newport News, York County, or Williamsburg-James City County


A brief description of the institution’s on-site child care facility, partnership with a local facility, and/or subsidies or financial support to help meet the child care needs of students:
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A brief description of the institution’s other policies and programs to support non-traditional students:

FlexTrack is a program for non‐traditional students with significant time constraints outside of the classroom--family commitments, full‐time employment, etc. Because FlexTrack students can take anywhere between 3 to 18 credits per semester, they are the only students on campus that can be classified as part-time undergraduates (taking fewer than 12 credits). Many FlexTrack students, however, do take a full course load (taking 12 credits or more)


Does the institution wish to pursue Part 2 of this credit (tracking accessibility and affordability)? (If data is not available, select 'No'):
Yes

The percentage of entering students that are low-income (0-100):
35

The graduation/success rate for low-income students (0-100):
89.69

On average, the percentage of need that was met for students who were awarded any need-based aid (e.g. as reported to the U.S. Common Data Set initiative, item H2) (0-100):
79

The percentage of students graduating with no interest-bearing student loan debt or for whom no out-of-pocket tuition is required (i.e. the percentage of graduates who have not taken out interest-bearing loans) (0-100):
63

Estimated percentage of students that participate in or directly benefit from the institution’s policies and programs to support low-income and non-traditional students (0-100):
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The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
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Additional documentation to support the submission:
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William & Mary meets 100% of the demonstrated financial need for all in-state students.

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.