Overall Rating Silver
Overall Score 53.85
Liaison Vic Shelburne
Submission Date Nov. 26, 2018
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

Clemson University
EN-1: Student Educators Program

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 1.09 / 4.00 Dr. Suzanne Price
Director of Residential Learning,
University Housing & Dining
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Number of students enrolled for credit (headcount):
23,406

Total number of students enrolled for credit that are served (i.e. directly targeted) by a student peer-to-peer sustainability outreach and education program (avoid double-counting to the extent feasible):
6,400

Percentage of students served by a peer-to-peer educator program:
27.34

Name of the student educators program:
EcoReps

Number of students served (i.e. directly targeted) by the program (headcount):
6,400

A brief description of the program, including examples of peer-to-peer outreach activities:

The Ecology Representatives (Eco-Reps) Program was established in 2011 to better educate and raise awareness about supporting a sustainable lifestyle, specifically within on-campus residences. This program provides opportunities to not only learn more about sustainable initiatives but facilitate discussion within housing complexes to deepen education and promote leadership in these areas.

The Eco-Reps Program encompasses numerous topics such as:

Environmental Awareness and Leadership
Recycling and Waste Stream Management
Energy Conservation
Clean Energy
Water Conservation
Building Design, Construction, Utility Usage, and Building Controls
Transportation and Mobility
Carbon Footprint and Green House Gas Emissions
Resource Management
Food Production, Preparation, Composting, and Gleaning (gardening)
Packaging Materials
Chemical Use
Human Population


A brief description of how the student educators are selected:

EcoReps are elected through each residential community’s community council. At the start of the school year, EcoReps Exec Board (elected the prior spring) recruit for open EcoReps positions. There are up to two EcoReps per community. After elections are held, if there are any vacancies, EcoReps are recruited by interest and appointment.


A brief description of the formal training that the student educators receive to prepare them to conduct peer outreach:

EcoReps engage in education and training year-round. We start during the RHA/Community Council Leadership Summit with basic sustainability training. We introduce students to sustainability socially, environmentally, and economically. Throughout the year at weekly EcoReps meetings, we continue to explore areas of sustainability. Additionally, EcoReps meetings are a space for EcoReps to do Ten-to-Teaches to share their passions with their peers. Outside of EcoReps meetings, we complete several experiential learning opportunities: Game Day Recycling where we sort trash after a football game, Storm Drain marking to learn about local waterways, Composting and Recycling facilities tour, and a Tour with Community Service opportunity at the Student Organic Farm.


A brief description of the financial and/or administrative support the institution provides to the program (e.g. annual budget and/or faculty/staff coordination):

EcoReps are supported through University Housing & Dining with an annual budget of $6,100.00. The budget covers programming expenses, EcoReps Exec Board stipends, EcoReps t-shirts, marketing materials and full coverage for attendance of the Southeastern EcoReps Conference (travel, lodging, conference fee, etc.). Overall, EcoReps are well supported within their communities and University Housing & Dining.


Name of the student educators program (2nd program):
Residence Hall Association (RHA) Executive Board

Number of students served (i.e. directly targeted) by the program (2nd program):
6,400

A brief description of the program, including examples of peer-to-peer outreach activities (2nd program):

The mission of RHA is to be a residential resource organization, advocate for on-campus residents and promote leadership, services, and opportunities in order to create a link between the residents and the University by educating the residents, promoting diversity and serving as a voice.


A brief description of how the student educators are selected (2nd program):

RHA Executive Board members are elected the spring semester before they start their position. Prior to election, students must present to the General Assembly and undergo a question and answer process.


A brief description of the formal training that the student educators receive to prepare them to conduct peer outreach (2nd program):

The RHA Executive Board receives training about sustainability from the Graduate Assistant for Sustainability. The training consists of a one-hour session about the triple bottom line of sustainability and a brief overview of the sister organization, EcoReps.


A brief description of the financial and/or administrative support the institution provides to the program (e.g. annual budget and/or faculty/staff coordination) (2nd program):

University Housing and Dining provides $5,000 annually to the organization.


Name of the student educators program (3rd program):
Students for Environmental Action

Number of students served (i.e. directly targeted) by the program (3rd program):
24,387

A brief description of the program, including examples of peer-to-peer outreach activities (3rd program):

We are Clemson University's Students for Environmental Action. Each semester this group comes together to dedicate time to campaigns that focus on environmental activism for the welfare of our planet and only home. These campaigns are both local and global. We also place emphasis on education and awareness as well as enjoy social events such as dinners and hikes. You'll come across a variety of perspectives, learn about topics you may have never considered before, and experience a feeling of accomplishment that you are contributing to an urgent and significant cause.

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/#!/CUSEA

Website: http://cusea.strikingly.com


A brief description of how the student educators are selected (3rd program):

Student educators are selected through a volunteer process. Anyone who is interested in the environment or who meets the requirements as stated in the constitution are eligible to become a member of SEA. Leadership roles are determined by members through a nomination and voting process.


A brief description of the formal training that the student educators receive to prepare them to conduct peer outreach (3rd program):

Students receive no formal training on the behalf of SEA. Any training comes from the University or other organizations members may be participate in.


A brief description of the financial and/or administrative support the institution provides to the program (e.g. annual budget and/or faculty/staff coordination) (3rd program):

Students for Environmental Action receives financial support from Clemson University’s Undergraduate Student Government and University Housing and Dining on an as needed basis. Administrative support is provided by an advisor who works as a faculty/staff member in one of the various University Departments


A brief description of all other student peer-to-peer sustainability outreach and education programs, including the number of students served and how student educators are selected, trained, and supported by the institution:

Name of the Program
• Solid Green Committee

Number of students served
• The entire campus community.

Description of how the student educators are selected
• By department or other committees.

Description of the formal training the student educators receive
• No formal training.

Description of the financial/administrative support the institution provides to the program
• None.


Total number of hours student educators are engaged in peer-to-peer sustainability outreach and education activities annually (all programs):
---

The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.