Overall Rating Silver - expired
Overall Score 51.18
Liaison Joseph Kahn
Submission Date April 20, 2017
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

Central Michigan University
PA-3: Participatory Governance

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.00 / 3.00 Thomas Rohrer
Director Great Lakes Institute for Sustainable Systems
Humanities, Social & Behavioral Science
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Do the institution’s students have a representative body through which they can participate in governance (e.g. a student council)? :
Yes

Do the institution’s students have an elected representative on the institution’s highest governing body?:
No

A brief description of the bodies and mechanisms through which students are engaged in governance, including information to support each affirmative response above:

Academic Senate: shared governance at work

The Academic Senate has enjoyed over a 40-year history as the University’s primary policy-making body for a wide range of issues involving academic life at CMU. The senate has a long tradition of productive and open debate and is committed to enhancing the academic experiences of students and faculty. The senate is the final faculty curricular authority for graduate and undergraduate programs, both on campus and off campus at CMU.

As a shared decision-making body, the senate’s membership consists of representatives elected by each academic department, six student representatives chosen by the Student Government Association, the academic deans, the provost, and the president. Academic Senate meetings are open to the public and are held bi-weekly on Tuesdays, 3:30 - 5:00 p.m., in Pearce Hall, Room 138.

Much of the work of the senate takes place through an elaborate network of committees. The senate is indebted to the many faculty, students, and administrators whose efforts have been responsible for the senate’s success.


Do the institution’s staff members have a representative body through which they can participate in governance (e.g. a staff council)?:
No

Do the institution’s non-supervisory staff members have an elected representative on the institution’s highest governing body?:
No

A brief description of the bodies and mechanisms through which staff are engaged in governance, including information to support each affirmative response above:
---

Do the institution’s teaching and research faculty have a representative body through which they can participate in governance (e.g. a faculty senate)?:
Yes

Do the institution’s teaching and research faculty have an elected representative on the institution’s highest governing body? :
No

A brief description of the bodies and mechanisms through which teaching and research faculty are engaged in governance, including information to support each affirmative response above:

Academic Senate: shared governance at work

The Academic Senate has enjoyed over a 40-year history as the university’s primary policy-making body for a wide range of issues involving academic life at CMU. The senate has a long tradition of productive and open debate and is committed to enhancing the academic experiences of students and faculty. The senate is the final faculty curricular authority for graduate and undergraduate programs, both on campus and off campus at CMU.

As a shared decision-making body, the senate’s membership consists of representatives elected by each academic department, six student representatives chosen by the Student Government Association, the academic deans, the provost, and the president. Academic Senate meetings are open to the public and are held bi-weekly on Tuesdays, 3:30 - 5:00 p.m., in Pearce Hall, Room 138.

Much of the work of the senate takes place through an elaborate network of committees. The senate is indebted to the many faculty, students, and administrators whose efforts have been responsible for the senate’s success.


Does the institution have written policies and procedures to identify and engage external stakeholders (i.e. local residents) in land use planning, capital investment projects, and other institutional decisions that affect the community?:
Yes

A copy of the written policies and procedures:
---

The policies and procedures:

​​​​​Students, faculty, staff, alumni, and community members engaged with the Master Plan consultants as follows:

Over 3,200 people took the on-line survey.
Over 420 people attended the discovery charrette providing input through discussions, on comment cards, and by placing stickers in response to questions on maps. An additional 200+ people provided input by completing comment cards and placing stickers in response to questions on maps placed throughout the University Center.
Over 90 people participated in the design charrette providing input and comments on the consultants plans for land use. More than 60 people attended the presentations of concepts at the end of the 3 day process.
The facility condition assessment consultants, together with more than 175 people (BMWs, building coordinator, custodians and CMU shop personnel), inspected more than 5,000,000 square feet of space in 80 buildings.
The space utilization consultant walked more than 5,400,000 square feet to confirm it​s use (e.g. office, classroom, etc.). He then met with more than 30 groups to discuss current space usage and future needs.
The Town Hall presentation was attended by 45 people who asked questions and provide input via comment cards.


Does the institution have formal participatory or shared governance bodies through which community members representing the interests of the following stakeholder groups can regularly participate in institutional governance?:
Yes or No
Local government and/or educational organizations Yes
Private sector organizations Yes
Civil society (e.g. NGOs, NPOs) Yes

A brief description of the bodies and mechanisms through which external stakeholders are engaged in institutional governance (including information about each stakeholder group selected above):

Local community members, educators, local government officials, non-governmental officials (such as members of the Michigan Recycling Coalition and the Chippewa Watershed Conservancy), local business owners, in addition to CMU affiliates, were invited to join in on the strategic planning process at Central Michigan University.

The above text, found in *Policies & Procedures*, explains how the University engaged external stakeholders in the governance process.


The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
---

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.