Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 75.90
Liaison Deborah Steinberg
Submission Date Dec. 6, 2021

STARS v2.2

Carnegie Mellon University
OP-11: Sustainable Procurement

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 1.50 / 3.00 Tim Butala
Executive Director, Procurement Services
Procurement Services
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have written policies, guidelines, or directives that seek to support sustainable purchasing across multiple commodity categories institution-wide?:
Yes

A copy of the policies, guidelines or directives:
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The policies, guidelines or directives:
From CMU Procurement Manual (Updated 01.14.2019) https://www.cmu.edu/finance/procurementservices/policies-procedures/files/procurement-manual.pdf 3.5 Utilizing Small and Disadvantaged Businesses CMU is committed to supporting small business enterprises that are independently owned and operated concern, including its affiliates, that are not dominant in the field of operation in which it is bidding on government contracts, and are qualified as a small business under the criteria and size standards in 13CFR Part 121 (see FAR 19.102). These definitions are applicable to International Initiatives, but references to U.S. government regulations may not apply. These enterprises are defined as: Small Disadvantaged Business A small business concern, owned and controlled by individuals who are both socially and economically disadvantaged, as defined by the Small Business Administration at 13CFR Part 124, the majority of earnings of which must directly accrue to such individuals. This term also means a small business concern owned and controlled by an economically disadvantaged Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization that meets the requirements of 13CFR 124.112 or 13CFR124.113, respectively. In general, 13CFR Part 124 describes a small, disadvantaged business concern as a small business concern. Small Women-Owned Business A small business concern in which at least 51% of the concern is owned and day-to-day managed and controlled by women, or in the case of a publicly owned business, at least 51% of the stock is owned by women, with one or more women managing and controlling the daily operation of the business. Small Veteran-Owned Business A small business concern in which at least 51% of the concern is owned and day-to-day managed and controlled by veterans (as defined at 38 U.S.C. 101[2]), or in the case of a publicly owned business, at least 51% of the stock is owned by veterans, with one or more veterans managing and controlling the daily operation of the business. Small Disabled Veteran-Owned Business A small business concern in which at least 51% of the concern is owned and day-to-day managed and controlled by disabled veterans (as defined at 38 U.S.C. 101[2]), or in the case of a publicly owned business, at least 51% of the stock is owned by disabled veterans, with one or more disabled veterans managing and controlling the daily operation of the business. HUB Zone A historically underutilized business zone, which is an area located within one or more qualified census tracts, qualified nonmetropolitan counties, or lands within the external boundaries of an Indian reservation. A HUB Zone Business is defined as a small business concern that appears on the List of Qualified HUB Zone Small Business Concerns maintained by the Small Business Administration (SBA). On International Initiatives campuses, these definitions will remain applicable, but references to US government regulations may not apply. Participation Goals The university has an overall goal for small business enterprise, which is defined under a small business plan that is approved every three years by ONR, participation of fifteen percent of the dollar volume of university purchasing, excluding purchasing from sole source providers where there is no discretion in supplier selection (e.g., utilities). Within this overall goal, the university has also established goals for socially and economically disadvantaged business enterprises, women-owned, veteran-owned, and disabled veteran-owned and HUB Zone business enterprise participation of five percent of the dollar volume of university purchasing. Goal establishment on awards from federal government agencies may differ per award. Sponsored Project Accounting (SPA) and the university Small Business Liaison Officer (SBLO) are responsible for tracking and reporting to the appropriate agencies individual award goal attainment and overall university goal attainment. Although individual purchases or projects may not reach the goals, the university's intent is to work for the achievement of these goals over a fiscal year. Success depends on the active commitment of all authorized buyers. University procurement activities for goods and services should be as inclusive as possible to allow small, disadvantaged, women-owned, veteran-owned, disabled veteran-owned and HUB Zone business enterprises the maximum practicable opportunity to participate in Carnegie Mellon acquisitions. The university's goals for procurement from small, disadvantaged, and women owned, veteran and HUB Zone business enterprises should be given consideration along with other selection factors, such as cost, ability to meet required schedules and ability to perform the required work satisfactorily. University procurement activities for goods and services should be as inclusive as possible. All contractors and suppliers doing business with Carnegie Mellon should share these goals and participate in their achievement. Tracking and Measurement Procurement Services, Sponsored Projects Accounting and the Office of Sponsored Programs are responsible for classifying, tracking and compiling statistical data and submitting management, administrative and governmental filings and reports. Procurement Services and Sponsored Projects Accounting work with the Office of Sponsored Programs, the University's Diversity Business Council and representatives of international initiatives to develop, implement and monitor the effectiveness of appropriate strategies to achieve university purchasing goals. SPA maintains specific reporting requirements for the government, which are reported twice a year and measured on an award basis. To ensure that the university's total procurement dollars are accurately represented Procurement Services provides Sponsored Projects Accounting with a semiannual report on subcontracted small business awards and are included in all management and government audits or reports. Buyers should access the Small Business Administration's database at https://www.sba.gov/offices/headquarters/ohp for verification. Providing Equal Opportunity To ensure that the university does not overlook suppliers who could supply the item(s) or service(s) needed, buyers should following these established guidelines: • Contact Procurement Services to assist in identifying small, disadvantaged, women-owned, veteran-owned, disabled veteran-owned and HUB Zone businesses. • Give small businesses a greater opportunity to supply items, consider unbundling larger orders into separate groupings (competition requirements are still applicable). • Contact Procurement Services when developing specifications for needs. • When using competitive bidding, give small, disadvantaged, women owned, veteran-owned, disabled veteran-owned and HUB Zone business suppliers the opportunity to submit bids. For more information regarding utilizing small and disadvantaged businesses, visit the Procurement Services website.

Does the institution employ Life Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA) when evaluating energy- and water-using products and systems?:
No

Which of the following best describes the institution’s use of LCCA?:
Institution employs LCCA less comprehensively, e.g. for certain types of systems or projects and not others

A brief description of the LCCA policy and/or practices:
Although there is no stated policy on LCCA, total cost of ownership is strongly encouraged regardless of category.

Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating chemically intensive products and services?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for chemically intensive products and services:
All hazardous materials must follow the EH&S Purchasing Hazardous Materials Procedure. The University's Janitorial Services contract requires the supplier the adhere to OSHA guidelines (29 CFR 1910 & 29 CFR 1926) for all material/suppliers containing hazardous substances. CMU has a Green Practice committee which advises on the university green initiative and best practices to achieve the stated goals. https://www.cmu.edu/ehs/hazmat-pcard/index.html https://www.cmu.edu/ehs/hazmat-pcard/documents/Purchasing%20Guideline%20v.4.pdf

Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating consumable office products?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for consumable office products:
Although there is no stated policy, the recycled content of paper is a key factor in the sourcing of paper supplies and is consistently being challenged in areas where the quality standards do not preclude the use of recycled content. University Receiving & Stores maintains supply for their respective needs.

Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating furniture and furnishings?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for furniture and furnishings:
CMU's competitive bidding process evaluates all bids and products therein through various lenses in order to determine the best value for each project. Our procurement process, specific to furniture and furnishings, is outlined in Section 8.7 of the Campus Design and Facility Development (CDFD) PM Manual, which is enacted and updated by CDFD. Specifications are evaluated at various intervals for their alignment with the University’s Green Practices, which advocate for responsible material selection. Furthermore, furniture bids are evaluated for appropriateness, completeness, alignment with current supplier agreements, environmental impacts, among many other factors. https://www.cmu.edu/cdfd/planning-and-design/design-construction

Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating Information technology (IT) and equipment?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for Information Technology (IT) and equipment:
Although there is no stated policy in this area, the university purchases Energy Star equipment for our computers, printers and desk phones and the energy usage and or the usage of hazardous materials is routinely evaluated when evaluating options.

Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating food service providers?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for food service providers:
Sustainability is an important aspect of the contract the University maintains with food services suppliers. In 2018, CMU re-bid its primary campus food vendor contract and sustainability was a key criteria in the RFP and important aspect of vendor selection leading to multi-year agreement awards. Our Mission Carnegie Mellon University Dining Services provides a unique and diverse food service program that meets the nutritional, educational, multi-cultural and social needs of students and the university community and contributes to the meta-curricular experience. Our Values Our core values are reflected in our daily interactions, decision-making opportunities and support the greater mission of the division and university. More about our sustainability criteria can be found here. https://www.cmu.edu/dining/about-us/ https://www.cmu.edu/dining/sustainability/

Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating garments and linens?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for garments and linens:
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Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating professional service providers?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for professional service providers:
Per the Carnegie Mellon Design and Construction Standards, all new construction and major renovations must achieve a minimum LEED silver rating within the most current version of LEED BD+C. In addition, less extensive renovations must apply LEED for Commercial Interiors as applicable to the scope of work. This attracts and emphasizes LEED knowledge and experience in campus projects. https://www.cmu.edu/cdfd/design-construction

Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating transportation and fuels?:
No

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for transportation and fuels:
While there is no formal guidance that addresses these areas, the University has installed infrastructure and negotiated public transit agreements to support non-fossil fuel based transportation, and public and shared transportation. Through a Port Authority Transit agreement, students, faculty and staff can ride public transit free with a CMU ID. The campus supports the use of electric vehicles by providing charge stations in preferred parking locations on campus. CMU completed a competitive bid and executed a multi year agreement with a new travel management preferred supplier who will be able to complete a more comprehensive summary of our travel footprint and associated carbon footprint. CMU continues to leverage the campus district steam facility, consuming natural gas rather than coal to lower emissions and offsets emissions from its electricity purchases.

Website URL where information about the institution’s sustainable procurement program or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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Data source(s) and notes about the submission:
Under "Optional Fields", the link provided captures CMU Sustainability Initiative and the 2020 Voluntary University Review of the Sustainable Development Goals. Included within are the seventeen Global Goals

Under "Optional Fields", the link provided captures CMU Sustainability Initiative and the 2020 Voluntary University Review of the Sustainable Development Goals. Included within are the seventeen Global Goals

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